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Former U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke on Tuesday said impeachment proceedings should begin against President Trump because of the administration’s refusal to comply with “any subpoena.”

Speaking at a CNN town hall, the 2020 contender from El Paso, Texas, said while it’s “not something that I take lightly,” he believes there are no other options than to start the impeachment process.

“It’s an incredibly serious, sober decision that we should make as a country. Really the last resort when every other option has failed us,” O’Rourke, a Democrat, said. He added that it’s because Trump won’t respond to subpoenas and overall because he won’t allow witnesses to testify to Congress “so we can find out what happened to this great democracy in 2016.”

REP. COHEN: ’80-90 PERCENT’ OF DEMS ON HOUSE JUDICIARY COMMITTEE READY TO PUSH FOR TRUMP IMPEACHMENT

“A president invited the involvement of a foreign power in this democracy in 2016, and then did everything in his power to obstruct the investigation into what has happened,” the former congressman said.

O’Rourke said that fear of what impeachment could mean for the country following the 2020 election shouldn’t matter. Because if that happens, “then we will have set a precedent for this country that, in fact, some people, because of the position of power and public trust that they hold, are above the law.”

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has pushed back on impeaching Trump. O’Rourke said he understands her viewpoint and “the political implications” of such proceedings, and said the U.S. needs to think about the future of the country.

“The only way that we’re gonna get the documents and the facts and the truth” is through impeachment proceedings,” he said. “It’s the only way we’re gonna get to the facts necessary to have accountability and justice.”

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Former U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, a candidate for the Democratic Party’s 2020 presidential nomination, used a televised town hall event Tuesday night to spread the debunked claim that President Trump called asylum-seekers “animals.”

The remarks from the former congressman from El Paso, Texas, came in response to the first question during the CNN event, which took place in Des Moines, Iowa, capital of the state where the first caucuses of next year’s election season will be held.

Sarah Duncan, a research associate from the political organization Vote Smart, asked O’Rourke how he planned to “restore global trust in American leadership.”

BETO WHO? OPPO RESEARCHERS SAY INTEREST IN THE TEXAN HAS FIZZLED OUT

Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke of Texas speaks in Las Vegas on April 27. (Associated Press)

Democratic presidential candidate and former U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas speaks in Las Vegas on April 27. (Associated Press)

The candidate began by calling Trump’s domestic and foreign policy a “disaster.”

“Describing those immigrants who come into this country as rapists and criminals — though they commit crimes at a far lower rate than those who were born in this country — describing asylum-seekers as animals or an infestation. An infestation is how you might describe a termite or a cockroach — something you want to stamp out, something less than human,” O’Rourke said.

“You don’t get kids in cages at the border unless you dehumanize them in the eyes of your fellow Americans,” he added. “The day that the president signed his executive order attempting to ban Muslim travel to the United States is the day that the mosque in Victoria, Texas, was literally torched to the ground.”

“The day that the president signed his executive order attempting to ban Muslim travel to the United States is the day that the mosque in Victoria, Texas, was literally torched to the ground.”

— Beto O’Rourke, Democrat running for president

But O’Rourke’s false claim went unchallenged by CNN Town Hall moderator Dana Bash.

Trump’s “animals” remark came in May 2018, on Long Island, N.Y., at a roundtable discussion of illegal immigration and sanctuary city policies. During a discussion with law enforcement officials, a sheriff referred to members of the violent gang MS-13.

President Trump responded by slamming MS-13 gang members, not migrants in general, as “animals.”

“We have people coming into our country — trying to come into our country, we’re stopping a lot of them — but we’re taking people out of the country. You wouldn’t believe how bad these people are. These aren’t people. These are animals,” Trump said.

At the time, his comments were taken out of context as if called all migrants “animals,” a falsehood that was spread by high-profile Democrats as well as many members of the media. The video went viral again in April after a Twitter user uploaded the same clip — and falsely claimed President Trump referred to asylum seekers as “animals.”

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O’Rourke went on to slam Trump for embracing Russian President Vladimir Putin and call Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation a “hoax” during a conversation after the report’s release.

When asked about how he would address immigration if elected, O’Rourke vowed to grant citizenship to DREAMers and offer a pathway to citizenship for all other illegal immigrants in the country.

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The frenzy surrounding Beto O’Rourke seems to have fizzled out.

America Rising, a top Republican opposition research firm, had been fielding a mountain of requests from political reporters on the Texan but says in the 10 weeks since he announced his bid to become the 2020 Democratic presidential nominee, inquires about him have dwindled considerably.

BIDEN CAMPAIGN TOUTS DIGITAL FUNDRAISING AFTER KICKOFF RALLY: $1,000 PER MINUTE  

“The requests for oppo on him have completed dried off,” a staffer at America Rising told The Daily Beast.

A lack of interest could spell more trouble for O’Rourke in a heavily crowded Democratic field.

O’Rourke, himself, seemed to acknowledge the dip in interest during an interview with MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow.

“I recognize I can do a better job also of talking to a national audience,” O’Rourke said. “I hope that I’m continuing to do better over time, but we’ve been extraordinarily fortunate with the campaign that we’ve run so far.”

Once at the top of Democratic watch-lists, O’Rourke is now registering in the single digits in several national polls. In the latest Fox News Poll, O’Rourke is trailing former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Bernie Sanders, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Sen. Kamala Harris. He is barely edging out New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker and Julian Castro.

KARL ROVE: TRUMP CAMPAIGN ‘FEELS VERY CAUTIOUS’ ABOUT CHANCES IN RUST BELT STATES 

An April Quinnipiac poll shows him tumbling from 12 percent to 5 percent.

It’s a stunning drop for the presidential contender who garnered immense media attention.

Despite his 2018 Senate loss to Ted Cruz, R-Texas, O’Rourke still managed to galvanize Texans, resulting in a massive turnout among first-time voters in some key counties. Supporters were still on board when he took the nation on a somewhat-aimless tour of America to find himself. In a series of posts on Medium, O’Rourke blogged about the sights, his thoughts and conversations he’s had with diners.

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Though his campaign is starting to roll out a new hiring initiative in key states and O’Rourke is hitting the media circuit more, some wonder if he’s fallen too far behind in the highly competitive race.

Source: Fox News Politics

Beto O’Rourke announced Friday that if he won the presidency in 2020, he would work to decriminalize truancy, illegitimate absences from school, and address fines on parents.

“We will also decriminalize truancy,” O’Rourke tweeted as part of a thread describing how he would address racial injustice. He argued that truancy and other aspects of the education system disproportionately affected people of color.

“States like Texas have taken the first step by repealing laws that prosecute children for truancy, but the fines their parents face still loom large in a system that disproportionately targets black and brown students. I will take this on.”

BETO LIVESTREAMS OWN HAIRCUT, MASSAGE DAY AFTER LAMENTING IMAGE OF ‘PRIVILEGE’

Truancy didn’t seem to receive a lot of attention in the 2020 cycle, although Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif, also a 2020 hopeful, came under fire for supporting an anti-truancy law in her home state. In an interview published in April, she said she regretted the “unintended consequences” of that policy.

“My regret is that I have now heard stories where in some jurisdictions, [District Attorneys] have criminalized the parents. And I regret that that has happened,” she said.

O’Rourke’s pledge came as he faced comparatively low poll numbers and fended off perceptions of “privilege.” In a series of tweets on Friday, O’Rourke proposed many ideas after lamenting racial disparities in education.

PRESIDENT TRUMP IS WRONG TO COUNT OUT BETO O’ROURKE: FORMER OBAMA ECONOMIC ADVISER

He also seemed to take aim at Judge Wendy Vitter, one of Trump’s judicial nominees who was confirmed on Thursday, by suggesting that she wouldn’t uphold the landmark ruling established in Brown v. Board of Education.

“And as president, I will only nominate judges who respect, affirm, and defend Brown v. Board. Andrew Oldham doesn’t get nominated,” he said, referring to another Trump nominee. “Neither does Wendy Vitter. If you don’t believe in civil rights, in equity, in opportunity, you don’t belong in a position of public trust.”

O’Rourke only received 4 percent of Democratic primary voters’ support in a Fox News poll from May 11-14. He attempted to reboot his campaign on Tuesday when he appeared on “The View” and lamented his “Vanity Fair” cover from earlier in 2019.

During that appearance, he decried injustices visited upon minorities and described how he became more aware of his privilege after traveling the country.

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“You’re right, there are things that I have been privileged to do in my life that others cannot. And I think the more that I travel and listen to people and listen from them, the clearer that becomes to me,” he said.

“When women in this country are paid 80 cents on the dollar that a man makes, African-American women 61 cents, Latinas 53 cents, when you have ten times the wealth in white America than you do in black America, when you have the largest population in prison population on the face of the planet and it is disproportionate to people of color, the systematic foundational discrimination we have in this country in every aspect of life, it’s something that I have not experienced in my lifetime.”

Source: Fox News Politics

It’s a time-honored tradition, and the growing crop of 2020 is proving itself no exception to the rule.

A number of Democratic contenders to enter the race had previously ruled out running for the Oval Office, with some even doing so while trying to win election to lower offices.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio became the latest Democrat to do so when he officially launched his candidacy on Thursday, making him the sixth 2020 hopeful this election cycle to be running for president after denying he had any intention.

During a Democratic mayoral primary debate in 2017, de Blasio was asked to make a pledge that he would serve all four years of his next term as the NYC mayor and was not going to run in 2020.

“I’m looking at that camera right there,” de Blasio pointed to the camera, “to my fellow New Yorkers, I’m running for one thing and one thing only- for re-election as mayor of New York City. It is my honor to be mayor of this great city. I want to serve for four more years.”

“Will you pledge to serve for four more years?” NY1 Spectrum News political reporter Grace Rauh asked.

“I will serve for four full years,” de Blasio assured NYC residents.

De Blasio, of course, is in good company.

Three senators, Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass, Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn, and Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY, were all re-elected in the 2018 midterm elections. All three of them, however, previously expressed they were simply running to maintain their level of office.

In March 2018, Warren was asked on “Meet The Press” if she would pledge to serve a full six-year term.

“So look, I am not running for president of the United States,” Warren stated. “I am running for the United States Senate 2018, Massachusetts, woohoo!”

“I don’t mean to pick on you about this, but do you know how many people have said that over the years?” NBC News’ Chuck Todd later responded after pointing out she didn’t actually pledge to serve her full term. “Two years before and then, of course, ended up running for president? Do you see why a lot of people aren’t going to believe that answer?”

Warren doubled down, saying she wasn’t “running” for president, which Todd pointed out was “present tense.” She did pledge to do so a month later when asked by reporters.

“Yes, that’s my plan,” she said at the time.

During an August 2018 debate, Klobuchar attempted to dispell the rumors that she was going to run against President Trump in 2020 by pledging she would finish her term.

“Of course I will,” Klobuchar said. “I think my track record shows that. I love working in the Senate. I love representing Minnesota.”

Gillibrand was also pressed about a presidential run during a debate in October 2018.

“I will serve my six-year term,” Gillibrand declared.

“Honestly, I don’t believe that,” her GOP opponent Chele Farley shot back.

Former congressman Beto O’Rourke insisted in September 2018 that he would remain in the Senate if he beat the incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Tex, and dismissed the notion that he would be former Vice President Joe Biden’s future running mate.

“I asked you to put me into this position of public trust and I could not ask you in good conscience if I didn’t intend to serve every single day of the next six years trying to make this state in this country better,” O’Rourke said. “You have my commitment tonight. I will not run for any other office in those six years. It’s 100 percent for Texas as your U.S. senator.”

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Seeking his re-election in the House of Representatives, Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass, appeared to have closed the door on a 2020 bid last October.

“I’m not running for president, period,” Moulton told McClatchy. “I just want to serve the country the best way I can. Right now, that’s as the representative of the Sixth District of Massachusetts.”

Moulton did leave open the possibility of a change of plans ahead of 2020.

“I don’t think it’s the best way I can serve the country right now… If that were to change, I would consider it, but I don’t think that’s the best way I can serve the country,” Moulton said.

Source: Fox News Politics

It’s a time-honored tradition, and the growing crop of 2020 is proving itself no exception to the rule.

A number of Democratic contenders to enter the race had previously ruled out running for the Oval Office, with some even doing so while trying to win election to lower offices.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio became the latest Democrat to do so when he officially launched his candidacy on Thursday, making him the sixth 2020 hopeful this election cycle to be running for president after denying he had any intention.

During a Democratic mayoral primary debate in 2017, de Blasio was asked to make a pledge that he would serve all four years of his next term as the NYC mayor and was not going to run in 2020.

“I’m looking at that camera right there,” de Blasio pointed to the camera, “to my fellow New Yorkers, I’m running for one thing and one thing only- for re-election as mayor of New York City. It is my honor to be mayor of this great city. I want to serve for four more years.”

“Will you pledge to serve for four more years?” NY1 Spectrum News political reporter Grace Rauh asked.

“I will serve for four full years,” de Blasio assured NYC residents.

De Blasio, of course, is in good company.

Three senators, Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass, Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn, and Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY, were all re-elected in the 2018 midterm elections. All three of them, however, previously expressed they were simply running to maintain their level of office.

In March 2018, Warren was asked on “Meet The Press” if she would pledge to serve a full six-year term.

“So look, I am not running for president of the United States,” Warren stated. “I am running for the United States Senate 2018, Massachusetts, woohoo!”

“I don’t mean to pick on you about this, but do you know how many people have said that over the years?” NBC News’ Chuck Todd later responded after pointing out she didn’t actually pledge to serve her full term. “Two years before and then, of course, ended up running for president? Do you see why a lot of people aren’t going to believe that answer?”

Warren doubled down, saying she wasn’t “running” for president, which Todd pointed out was “present tense.” She did pledge to do so a month later when asked by reporters.

“Yes, that’s my plan,” she said at the time.

During an August 2018 debate, Klobuchar attempted to dispell the rumors that she was going to run against President Trump in 2020 by pledging she would finish her term.

“Of course I will,” Klobuchar said. “I think my track record shows that. I love working in the Senate. I love representing Minnesota.”

Gillibrand was also pressed about a presidential run during a debate in October 2018.

“I will serve my six-year term,” Gillibrand declared.

“Honestly, I don’t believe that,” her GOP opponent Chele Farley shot back.

Former congressman Beto O’Rourke insisted in September 2018 that he would remain in the Senate if he beat the incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Tex, and dismissed the notion that he would be former Vice President Joe Biden’s future running mate.

“I asked you to put me into this position of public trust and I could not ask you in good conscience if I didn’t intend to serve every single day of the next six years trying to make this state in this country better,” O’Rourke said. “You have my commitment tonight. I will not run for any other office in those six years. It’s 100 percent for Texas as your U.S. senator.”

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Seeking his re-election in the House of Representatives, Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass, appeared to have closed the door on a 2020 bid last October.

“I’m not running for president, period,” Moulton told McClatchy. “I just want to serve the country the best way I can. Right now, that’s as the representative of the Sixth District of Massachusetts.”

Moulton did leave open the possibility of a change of plans ahead of 2020.

“I don’t think it’s the best way I can serve the country right now… If that were to change, I would consider it, but I don’t think that’s the best way I can serve the country,” Moulton said.

Source: Fox News Politics

Former Vice President Joe Biden leads the race for the 2020 Democratic nomination for president, according to the latest Fox News Poll.

Among Democratic primary voters, Biden’s 35 percent (up from 31 percent in March) leaves Bernie Sanders in a distant second place with 17 percent (down from 23 percent).

Elizabeth Warren is next at 9 percent, Pete Buttigieg receives 6 percent, followed by Kamala Harris at 5 percent, Beto O’Rourke at 4 percent, Cory Booker at 3 percent, and Julian Castro and Amy Klobuchar at 2 percent apiece.  John Delaney, Tulsi Gabbard, Jay Inslee, Tim Ryan, Marianne Williamson, and Andrew Yang each garner one percent.

Since March, Warren and Buttigieg gained five percentage points and Biden is up four, while Sanders dropped six points, O’Rourke four and Harris three.

About half of Democratic primary voters (49 percent) are paying “a lot” of attention to the candidates, and Biden performs even better in the ballot test among this tuned-in group:  41 percent back him, 17 percent Sanders, 10 percent Warren, and 7 percent Buttigieg.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE POLL RESULTS

The highest priority of Democratic primary voters is defeating Donald Trump, as 73 percent feel that is “extremely” important.  Next, 71 percent say it’s extremely important their nominee has high ethical standards.  Roughly half want a candidate who shares their views on major issues (51 percent), has new ideas (47 percent), and has a record of accomplishments as a political leader (47 percent).  Fewer prioritize someone who is likeable (39 percent), will shake up Washington (38 percent), and represents a new generation (37 percent).

For each trait, Biden leads among those primary voters who say it is extremely important.

Biden also performs best in hypothetical 2020 matchups.  Among all registered voters, he leads Trump by 11 points (49-38 percent), up from a 7-point advantage in March.  Biden’s is the only lead outside the margin of sampling error in the matchups tested — and he is the only Democrat to push Trump’s support below 41 percent.

Sanders tops Trump by 5 points (46-41 percent) and Warren is up by two (43-41 percent), while Harris ties Trump (41-41 percent) and Buttigieg trails him by one (40-41 percent).

The president’s reelect number holds steady at 38 percent, while 54 percent would back someone else if the 2020 presidential election were today.  In December, it was 38-55 percent.

Trump’s 16-point reelect deficit is far larger than the 5-point gap former President Barack Obama had around this same point in the election cycle.  For Obama, it was 44 percent reelect vs. 49 percent someone else in June 2011.

Overall, 28 percent of voters would “definitely” reelect Trump, while 46 percent would “definitely” vote for someone else.

The first primary elections are about nine months away and the 2020 general election is 18 months off, yet interest in next year’s election is already remarkably high.  Nearly 6-in-10 voters, 57 percent, are extremely interested.

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That’s even higher than the 54 percent who felt that way the week before the 2016 presidential election.  In July 2015, a similar point in the electoral cycle, 31 percent were “extremely” interested.

Sixty-four percent of Clinton voters and 59 percent of Trump voters are “extremely” interested.

Conducted May 11-14, 2019 under the joint direction of Beacon Research (D) and Shaw & Company (R), this Fox News Poll includes interviews with 1,008 randomly chosen registered voters nationwide who spoke with live interviewers on both landlines and cellphones.  The poll has a margin of sampling error of plus or minus three percentage points for all registered voters, and 4.5 points for Democratic primary voters (469).

Source: Fox News Politics

The “Fox & Friends” hosts weighed in Thursday morning on the latest in the 2020 race, including New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announcing his run and Beto O’Rourke livestreaming a haircut appointment.

De Blasio, who is set to announce his campaign Thursday morning, would be the 23rd candidate to join the race for the Democratic nomination.

Brian Kilmeade, Steve Doocy and Ainsley Earhardt pointed out a New York Post op-ed that called his candidacy a “complete farce.” Meantime, a Quinnipiac poll found that 76 percent of New York City voters do not want de Blasio to run for president.

“We don’t want to lose him,” Kilmeade quipped, arguing that de Blasio and Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) “despise each other” and the state is “paying the price” for it.

TUCKER CARLSON: BETO O’ROURKE HAS ‘CHANGED’ — AND HE’S GROVELING, JUST LIKE ALL THE OTHER 2020 DEMS

Ainsley Earhardt said all 23 hopefuls are trying to do something to stand out from the crowd and appeal to voters, including O’Rourke’s latest livestream.

The video, in which he talked to voters while getting a haircut, received instant criticism on Twitter.

“They’re trying to get attention,” said Ainsley Earhardt, recalling the former Texas congressman’s previous livestream of his dentist appointment.

Steve Doocy said O’Rourke referred to it as an “impromptu town hall,” talking about education and other issues.

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Source: Fox News Politics

A new survey shows former Vice President Joe Biden opening up a large lead over President Donald Trump in a hypothetical 2020 general election matchup in the crucial battleground state of Pennsylvania.

The Quinnipiac University poll, released on Wednesday, is the latest national or state survey to give Biden a clear lead over the rest of the historically large Democratic field in the race for the party’s presidential nomination.

BIDEN DEFENDS CLIMATE RECORD AFTER JABS BY OCASIO-CORTEZ

According to the Keystone State poll, Biden tops Trump 53 percent to 42 percent in a head-to-head matchup. While the president holds a four-percentage-point advantage among men, Biden enjoys a 24-point lead among women. The Democrat also edges out Trump 49 percent to 45 percent among all white voters, while crushing the president 70 percent to 27 percent among non-white voters in the state.

Biden was born and spent his first ten years in Scranton, Pa., before moving with his family to Delaware. Biden went on to represent Delaware for nearly four decades in the U.S. Senate before becoming Barack Obama’s vice president. But he kept his deep ties to his native state and was often referred to by Keystone State Democrats as “Pennsylvania’s third senator” during his years in the upper chamber of Congress.

HARRIS SAYS BIDEN WOULD MAKE A GREAT RUNNING MATE

The Quinnipiac survey indicates Trump’s approval rating in the state is underwater, with just 42 percent of voters approving of the job the president’s doing in the White House, while 54 percent give Trump a thumbs down.

Pennsylvania is one of three Rust Belt states – along with Michigan and Wisconsin – making up the traditional Democratic ‘blue wall’ in presidential elections that Trump narrowly captured in 2016. The president edged out Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in Pennsylvania by less than one percentage point, becoming the first GOP candidate to carrying the state since George H.W. Bush in 1988.

The Pennsylvania poll also shows independent Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont leading Trump 50 percent to 43 percent in a hypothetical general election matchup. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts edges out the president 47 percent to 44 percent, while Trump is in a virtual tie with Sen. Kamala Harris of California, South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas in other potential Pennsylvania showdowns.

“More than half of Pennsylvania voters say they are better off financially than they were in 2016. But the economy isn’t giving President Donald Trump an edge in an early read of the very key Keystone State,” Quinnipiac University Poll analyst Mary Snow said.

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In the state’s Democratic primary race, the survey puts Biden at 39 percent support, with Sanders a distant second at 13 percent. Warren and Harris each are at eight percent, Buttigieg garners six percent, and Sen. Cory Booker of neighboring New Jersey has five percent support. Every other candidate registered at two percent or less.

“Bolstering Vice President Biden’s numbers is something on which Democrats of all stripes in Pennsylvania agree: Whether they back Biden or not, more than 60 percent believe he has the best chance of defeating Trump in 2020,” Snow spotlighted.

The Quinnipiac University survey was conducted May 9-14, with  978 Pennsylvania voters questioned by live telephone operators. The survey has an overall sampling error of plus or minus 4.2 percentage points.

Source: Fox News Politics

It might be time for Beto to cut back on how much he shares with fans.

O’Rourke, fresh off an apology-filled reboot of his 2020 campaign on “The View” in which he lamented his initial display of “privilege,” posted a bizarre video on his Facebook page.

In the video, Beto is seen getting a haircut and an apparent massage from a barber named “Manuel.”

The video showed him speaking in Spanish with Manuel along with another man who entered the shop, which was named “Chemas.” His livestream came just a day after he expressed regret over a Vanity Fair cover which, he said, made him seem elitist and reinforced a “perception of privilege.”

Awkwardly, at one point in the livestream another customer strolled into the barbershop and said he recognized O’Rourke, but did not know who he was. The Texas Democrat explained to the man he is running for president.

The former Congressman also took questions from viewers during the stream, before eventually discussing his education reform platform.

TUCKER CARLSON: BETO O’ROURKE HAS ‘CHANGED’ — AND HE’S GROVELING, JUST LIKE ALL THE OTHER 2020 DEMS

This wasn’t the first time O’Rourke gave voters a glimpse into his day-to-day life, with the 2020 hopeful posting a livestream of a trip to the dentist back in January.

On Twitter, the 2020 hopeful received some intense criticism for his latest livestream. Writer Gabriel Malor suggested that O’Rourke’s video helped further the perception that he ran a “vanity campaign.”

Another Twitter user claimed the hair cut livestream was worse than his Vanity Fair cover.

Many on Facebook praised the 2020 frontrunner and cheered the livestream. “WE NEED YOU BETO,” one commenter said. “LETS GO BETO,’ another said in the comments section of the livestream.

PRESIDENT TRUMP IS WRONG TO COUNT OUT BETO O’ROURKE: FORMER OBAMA ECONOMIC ADVISER

O’Rourke’s video and reboot came as he trailed behind a slew of other Democrats seeking the party’s nomination in 2020.

On Tuesday, President Donald Trump attacked some of those 2020 contenders and seemed to poke fun at O’Rourke’s attempt to restart his campaign.

“Beto’s falling fast, what the hell happened?” he asked. “He’s trying to restart his campaign. Doesn’t work out too well, history has said that’s trouble, but he’s going to restart his campaign.”

O’Rourke received a surge of support when he challenged Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, in 2018. Other than the Vanity Fair cover, O’Rourke’s former girlfriend appeared to give him a publicity boost when she recalled his positive qualities in a Washington Post op-ed.

BETO O’ROURKE SUGGESTS STACEY ABRAMS MAY HAVE LOST IN A RIGGED ELECTION

During Wednesday’s livestream, he took questions from Facebook commenters and discussed his children. He also described how Manuel left Juarez, Mexico amid violence and opened his business in O’Rourke’s home town of El Paso, Texas.

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“Love that he chose to come to El Paso, contribute here, start a business, helping to make people look good during the day by cutting their hair,” O’Rourke said.

He also remarked on how he needed to get his ear hair cut in order to prevent it from getting “nasty.”

Source: Fox News Politics


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