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Gov. Jay Inslee, the Democrat from Washington, signed a bill into law on Tuesday that allows the composting of human bodies as an alternative to burials and cremations.

The Evergreen state is the first state to approve the measure after an earlier trial study that involved six backers who agreed to the organic reduction. The results were positive and the “soil smelled like soil and nothing else.”

Troy Hottle, a fellow at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, told The Seattle Times earlier this year that the method is as “close to the natural process of decomposition [as] you’d assume a body would undergo before we had an industrialized society.”

Licensed facilities in the state will offer a “natural organic reduction.” The body is mixed with substances like wood chips into about two wheelbarrows’ worth of soil in a span of several weeks. Loved ones are allowed to keep the soil to spread, just as they might spread the ashes of someone who has been cremated — or even use it to plant vegetables or a tree.

“It gives meaning and use to what happens to our bodies after death,” said Nora Menkin, executive director of the Seattle-based People’s Memorial Association, which helps people plan for funerals.

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The bill, SB 5001, takes effect on May 1, 2020.  The bill reportedly passed easily in Aprile and had bipartisan support in the state Senate and House of Representatives.

An NBC News report last year said the procedure could cost $5,500.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

Source: Fox News Politics

Gov. Jay Inslee, the Democrat from Washington, signed a bill into law on Tuesday that allows the composting of human bodies as an alternative to burials and cremations.

The Evergreen state is the first state to approve the measure after an earlier trial study that involved six backers who agreed to the organic reduction. The results were positive and the “soil smelled like soil and nothing else.”

Troy Hottle, a fellow at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, told The Seattle Times earlier this year that the method is as “close to the natural process of decomposition [as] you’d assume a body would undergo before we had an industrialized society.”

Licensed facilities in the state will offer a “natural organic reduction.” The body is mixed with substances like wood chips into about two wheelbarrows’ worth of soil in a span of several weeks. Loved ones are allowed to keep the soil to spread, just as they might spread the ashes of someone who has been cremated — or even use it to plant vegetables or a tree.

“It gives meaning and use to what happens to our bodies after death,” said Nora Menkin, executive director of the Seattle-based People’s Memorial Association, which helps people plan for funerals.

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The bill, SB 5001, takes effect on May 1, 2020.  The bill reportedly passed easily in Aprile and had bipartisan support in the state Senate and House of Representatives.

An NBC News report last year said the procedure could cost $5,500.

The Associated Press contributed to this report

Source: Fox News Politics

Democratic lawmakers in Massachusetts want to take “God” out of the oath of office for every elected official in the Bay State.

The bill, proposed by State Representative Mindy Domb, D-Amherst, would amend the state Constitution — the oldest in the country — from “so help me, God,” to a longer, secular version: “This I do under the pains and penalties of perjury.”

PENNSYLVANIA STATE DEMS SLAM REPUBLICAN’S PRAYER AS ‘OFFENSIVE,’ BIGOTED

The measure was approved by the Joint Legislative Committee and is supported by atheists who believe invoking God violates the establishment clause and goes against America’s pluralistic history.

“We support any move that helps to increase the government’s commitment to secularism,” Zachary Bos, the state director for American Atheists, told The Meadville Tribune.

ONLY SIGNED COPY OF US RECOGNITION OF ‘STATE OF ISRAEL’ CAN BE YOURS FOR $300G

The bill would also amend the historic document, written by John Adams, to make it more gender neutral, changing the pronoun from “he” to “they.”

But conservatives say removing “God” is just the latest example of secular efforts to diminish the influence of religion in society.

400-YEAR-OLD PILGRIMS BIBLE STOLEN FROM US AS PART OF $8M HEIST RETURNS HOME: FBI

“It’s yet another cynical attempt to erase the rich legacy of faith that has been part of our Commonwealth form the Pilgrims to today,” Andrew Beckwith, president of the Massachusetts Family Institute, told News and Tribune.

Since being ratified in 1780, the state constitution has been amended 121 times, a process that could take up to several years and requires approval from two consecutive legislatures before being cleared for a statewide ballot, to let voters decide. The most recent change was in 2006 when voters approved the state’s health care law, which served as a model for ObamaCare.

RABBI BLASTS ILHAN OMAR, NYT FOR PUSHING CLAIM JESUS WAS ‘PALESTINIAN,’ NOT JEWISH

Both Presidents Barack Obama and Trump used the phrase “so help me, God,” a tradition historians trace back to President Abraham Lincoln in 1861.

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Earlier this year, House Democrats failed to strike “so help you God” from the House committee oath after a Republican outcry.

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Washington state lawmakers on Friday passed a bill that would allow residents take part in “natural organic reduction” of human remains, citing in part research that said careful composted human remains could be safe for use in a household garden, reports said.

The Seattle Times reported that Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee’s office on Friday said he did not review the final legislation. Inslee– who is running for president— has been active on Twitter since the state Senate and House of Representative passed bill 5001, but did not mention the bill in any posts. The bill reportedly passed easily and had bipartisan support.

The report pointed out that the measure has been several years in the making. There was a trial that involved six backers who agreed to organic reduction. The results were positive and “the soil smelled like soil and nothing else,” the report said.

Troy Hottle, a fellow at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, told the paper that the method is as “close to the natural process of decomposition [as] you’d assume a body would undergo before we had an industrialized society.”

An NBC News report last year said the procedure could cost $5,500.

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“People from all over the state who wrote to me are very excited about the prospect of becoming a tree or having a different alternative for themselves,” Democratic state Sen. Jamie Pedersen told NBC.

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A group of family members of murder victims in California, along with a number of district attorneys from across the state, gathered in Sacramento on Thursday to denounce Gov. Gavin Newsom’s recent moratorium on the death penalty.

At a press conference led by Orange County District Attorney Todd Spitzer, the family members and district attorneys slammed Newsom’s move to put a moratorium on the executions of the 737 inmates currently incarcerated in the Western Hemisphere’s largest death row and called on the California governor to rescind his executive order.

“Governor Newsom took a knife and stabbed all the victims and all the victims’ families in the heart,” Spitzer said.

Spitzer also criticized Newsom for travelling to El Salvador this week instead of meeting with murder victims’ families. Newsom is in the Central American nation in an attempt to counter the Trump administration’s harsh immigration stance and recent moves to cut millions of dollars in U.S. aid to the country.

CALIFORNIA DEMS FLEX NEW SUPERMAJORITY, WITH PLANS TO PURSUE GUN TAX AND MORE

“The governor decided to spend the week out of state, out of country, to meet with people he thinks are victims, when he could have met with victims in his own state,” he said.

Newsom’s office did not immediately return Fox News’ request for comment.

The press conference comes a day after prosecutors in the state announced they will seek the death penalty if they convict the man suspected of being the notorious “Golden State Killer,” who eluded capture for decades.

Prosecutors from four counties, including Orange County, announced their decision on Wednesday during a short court hearing for Joseph DeAngelo. He was arrested a year ago based on DNA evidence linking him to at least 13 murders and more than 50 rapes across California in the 1970s and ’80s.

Ron Harrington, whose brother Keith Harrington’s murder is one of those linked to the alleged Golden State Killer, castigated Newsom’s decision. Keith Harrington, along with his wife, Patti, were found bludgeoned to death in August of 1980 inside their home in a gated community just outside Dana Point, Calif.

NEW JERSEY MANSION MURDERS SPUR CALLS FOR STATE TO REINSTATE DEATH PENALTY

“The Golden State Killer is the worst of the worst of the worst ever,” Ron Harrington said Thursday during the press conference. “He is the poster child for the death penalty.”

Harrington added: “Gov. Newsom, please explain to the Golden State Killer’s victims how they should be lenient and compassionate.”

Steve Herr – whose son, Sam Herr, was murdered and then dismembered by Daniel Wozniak in May 2010 inside an apartment in Costa Mesa, Calif. – also criticized Newsom.

Wozniak, who was sentenced to capital punishment in 2016, killed Herr and his college friend and tutor, Julie Kibuishi, as part of a plan to steal money Herr had saved from his military service in Afghanistan so that he could pay for his upcoming wedding and honeymoon.

Wozniak then staged the crime scene to make it appear as though Kibuishi had been sexually assaulted by Herr and that Herr had gone on the run.

The convicted murderer also dismembered both victims by cutting off the hands of both and removing Herr’s head.

“Gov. Newsom wasn’t there when I walked into my son’s apartment and found the body of Julie Kibuishi absolutely defiled,” Herr’s father said. “He wasn’t there when I walked into the mortuary and saw my son all sewed up.”

CALIFORNIA GOES TAX WILD, EYES LEVIES ON EVERYTHING FROM WATER TO TIRES 

Newsom’s moratorium, which he signed last month, is seen as largely a symbolic move as California has not executed an inmate since 2006 amid legal challenges, but it still marked a major victory for opponents of capital punishment given the state’s size and its national political influence.

“I’ve gotten a sense over many, many years of the disparity in our criminal justice system,” Newsom said during a press conference on Wednesday. “We can make a more enlightened choice.”

Newsom also ordered in March that the equipment used in executions at San Quentin State Prison – the facility where capital punishment was carried out for men in California – be shut down and removed.

“We cannot advance the death penalty in an effort to soften the blow of what happens to these victims,” Newsom said. “If someone kills, we do not kill. We’re better than that.”

Despite recent polling indicating that support for the death penalty is at its lowest level since the early 1970s, Newsom’s order still bucks the will of most California residents. California voters previously rejected an initiative to abolish capital punishment in the state and instead, in 2016, voted in favor of Proposition 66 to help speed up executions.

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Newsom’s move to halt executions was panned last month by President Trump, who has been a harsh critic of Newsom’s ever since the governor took office earlier this year.

“Defying voters, the Governor of California will halt all death penalty executions of 737 stone cold killers. Friends and families of the always forgotten VICTIMS are not thrilled, and neither am I!” Trump tweeted.

California has executed 13 inmates since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976 and the state has the most people on death row in the country. Since the 1970s, 79 death row inmates have died of natural causes in the state and 26 by suicide. The last execution held in California occurred in 2006 when 76-year-old Clarence Ray Allen, who was convicted of killing three people, was executed.

Since then a series of stays of execution issued by the Federal District Court in San Francisco have held up any executions in the state, but there are now 25 inmates on death row who have exhausted all their appeals. Newsom said that none of the inmates currently on death row will have their sentences commuted, but will possibly be transferred back into the state’s general prison population.

“I believe I’m doing the right thing,” he said. “I cannot sign off on executing hundreds and hundreds of human beings knowing that among them there will be innocent people.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh, who last week took an indefinite leave of absence from office amid an ongoing book controversy, has been called to step down immediately by the city council.

The 14 members of the Baltimore City Council sent a two-sentence letter to Pugh on Monday to urging her to resign, effective immediately. All members of the city council except acting mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young signed the letter.

“The entire membership of the Baltimore City Council believes that it is not in the best interest of the City of Baltimore for you to continue to serve as Mayor,” the council members wrote to Pugh. “We urge you to tender your resignation, effective immediately.”

BALTIMORE MAYOR’S $500G DEAL FOR ‘HEALTHY HOLLY’ CHILDREN’S BOOKS DRAWS SCRUTINY

Copies of the letter were also sent to City Solicitor Andre Davis, Pugh’s chief of staff Bruce Williams, the city’s senators and delegates in the Maryland General Assembly and Young.

Pugh is under fire after she reportedly received $500,000 from the University of Maryland Medical System for her self-authored “Healthy Holly,” a children’s book series.

The university paid Pugh for 100,000 copies of her books between 2011 and 2018 while she was on its board. The books were intended to go to schools and day care centers, however, some 50,000 copies remain unaccounted for and may never have been printed, the Baltimore Sun reported.

BALTIMORE MAYOR CATHERINE PUGH TAKES INDEFINITE LEAVE OF ABSENCE AMID BOOK CONTROVERSY

The state prosecutor opened an investigation earlier this month into the books’ sales, the Baltimore Sun reported.

Pugh announced last Monday she was taking an indefinite leave of absence to recover from a bout of pneumonia for which she was hospitalized for five days. Her spokesman told the Baltimore Sun on Saturday that Pugh intends to return to her post once her health has sufficiently improved.

This statement appeared to prompt the City Council to urge her to step down.

“Baltimore will continue to have a cloud over its head while the investigations into Mayor Pugh’s business dealings go on,” Councilman Brandon Scott said in a statement. “My colleagues and I understand the severity of the action we have taken, but know that it’s what’s the best for Baltimore.”

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Councilman Zeke Cohen said while the move was “unprecedented,” it is the best course for Baltimore.

Pugh, at a news conference last week, described the book deal with the university-based health care system as a “regrettable mistake,” and apologized for “any lack of confidence or disappointment” citizens and colleagues may have felt.

Pugh has not commented on the city council’s letter.

Fox News’ Nicole Darrah contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

At 18, you have the right to vote, serve on a jury and serve your country.

But buy cigarettes? In a bid to snuff out smoking among teens, an increasing number of states are trying to delay that ‘right’ until age 21.

TEEN VAPING BOOM

New York and Maryland became the latest states to act this week. The New York state Senate voted Monday to raise the tobacco and e-cigarette purchasing age from 18 to 21, sending the bill to Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s desk. The Democratic governor is expected to sign it – coming after New York City already raised its smoking age to 21 under the Bloomberg administration.

Maryland GOP Gov. Larry Hogan is considering similar legislation that just passed the General Assembly but reportedly has not said whether he would sign it.

Katherine Ungar, executive director of Tobacco 21, the anti-smoking advocacy group backing the push, told Fox News that support for raising the smoking age “reaches across all demographics.”

“Increasing the sale age of all tobacco products will help counter tobacco company efforts to target young adults at a critical time when many move from experimenting with tobacco to regular smoking,” Ungar said.

As part of their push, Tobacco 21 is targeting products ranging from cigarettes to smokeless tobacco to e-cigarettes. Hawaii, Utah, Oregon, California, Maine, Virginia, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Arkansas and Washington D.C. have already raised their tobacco purchase age to 21, all in the last five years.

YOUTH SMOKING DECLINE STALLS

New York will soon join the list presuming Cuomo signs the state bill – and the governors of Illinois, Washington state and now Maryland are considering signing similar legislation. Several other states are pressing forward with their own bills including Florida, Ohio, Louisiana and Arizona.

Florida state Sen. David Simmons of Florida, a Republican who introduced the “Tobacco 21” legislation, told Fox News that he is “getting tremendous support.”

“It’s a common-sense issue,” he said.

A new law in Arkansas, meanwhile, would gradually raise the tobacco age from 18 to 21 over the next three years. State Rep. Lee Johnson, a Republican who introduced the legislation in his state, told Fox News: “While it won’t prevent all high school consumption of nicotine, I do believe it will be effective at reducing rates of use.” He notes that active military are exempt from the new rules.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that “Nearly 9 out of 10 cigarette smokers first try cigarette smoking by age 18” and that “Nearly 1 of every 5 high school students (20.8%) reported in 2018 that they used electronic cigarettes in the past 30 days—an increase from 1.5% in 2011.” The CDC, in the report, recommended raising the tobacco age to 21 to curb youth tobacco product use.

Most pieces of Tobacco 21-backed legislation include prohibiting the use of e-cigarettes for those under 21 years old. That industry is not publicly opposing the legislation, however. A Juul spokesman reportedly said in reference to Ohio legislation that “Tobacco 21 laws have been shown to dramatically reduce youth smoking rates,” voicing support for raising the minimum purchase age for all tobacco products.

Altria, which owns Marlboro and a 35 percent stake in Juul, also told Fox News in a statement: “We agree that the current trends in underage e-vapor use must be addressed. Tobacco harm reduction for adults cannot succeed without effective measures to reduce underage use of all tobacco products. The best approach to achieving this goal is to increase the minimum age for purchasing tobacco products to 21. Taking this important step will address the main way underage youth gain access to tobacco products today – from friends who are of legal age.”

San Francisco, meanwhile, has proposed banning all e-cigarettes until the FDA has time to evaluate the risks associated with “vaping.”

Opponents of the legislation, however, have voiced concern that it could drive up illegal sales among young smokers.

Todd Maisch, CEO of The Illinois Chamber, a nonprofit group which lobbies for a variety of businesses, told Fox News “we remain opposed to the Tobacco 21 push” and that the legislation “creates a gray market in the industry, the more you restrict the use of a legal product the more you drive people to purchase on the gray or black market.”

Addressing one area of potential concern, many of the states have exceptions for active-military members between ages 18 and 21.

In Florida, Simmons said, “We believe that if you are serving in the military and you want to go ahead and smoke or take whatever other tobacco products that are permitted then you go ahead” and that “the overall danger is to young people.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Wisconsin’s Supreme Court race to replace a retiring liberal judge appeared to be heading for a recount Tuesday, with the outcome largely seen as a measure of the battleground state’s mood ahead of the 2020 presidential election.

With the unofficial vote tally at 99 percent, only 1,600 votes out of nearly 1.2 million votes cast separated conservative candidate Brian Hagedorn, the leader, from liberal-backed challenger Lisa Neubauer.

SUPREME COURT WARILY WEIGHS PARTISAN GERRYMANDERING 

The Associated Press did not declare a winner, noting that the race was within the 1 percentage point margin for a recount. If the margin remains within the 1 percentage point difference, the trailing candidate would be allowed to request a recount paid for by taxpayers.

“This race is too close to call,” Neubauer campaign manager Tyler Hendricks said in a statement obtained by FOX6 Milwaukee. “We are almost assuredly headed to a recount. We are going to make sure every vote is counted. Wisconsinites deserve to know we have had a fair election and that every vote is counted.”

TEXAS JUDGE ACCIDENTALLY RESIGNS AFTER POSTING FUTURE POLITICAL PLANS ONLINE

The court is currently controlled 4-3 by conservatives, who have held the majority since 2008. If Hagedorn wins, the scales would tip in favor of conservatives 5-2, ensuring majority control for years to come. Liberals were hoping for a Neubauer win to give them a shot at taking majority control in 2020.

The outcome will also test the climate of the imminent 2020 election cycle, with Wisconsin seen as a critical battleground for presidential hopefuls. In 2016, Donald Trump won Wisconsin with 47.8 percent of the vote to Hillary Clinton’s 47 percent.

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Both Neubauer, 61, and Hagedorn, 41, are appeals court judges.

The winner will serve a 10-year term and replace retiring liberal Justice Shirley Abrahamson, who is 85.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Arizona Rep. David Stringer resigned Wednesday amid an ethics investigation of 1983 sex charges and his comments on race and immigration.

The Prescott Republican lawmaker stepped down as he faced a 5 p.m. deadline to hand over documents demanded by the House Ethics Committee. Earlier in the day he made an emergency request for a judge to block the Legislature from expelling him, then withdrew it as a hearing was scheduled to begin.

"I’m grateful that the House will not be forced to take action against one of our members, and we can begin to put this matter behind us," House Speaker Rusty Bowers said in a statement announcing Stringer’s resignation.

Stringer is the subject of two ethics complaints following newspaper reports that he was charged with sex crimes more than three decades ago. The charges were later expunged. He’s also being investigated over two viral videos of his comments that were widely denounced as racist.

His resignation ends the Republican majority in the House until Stringer is replaced and will likely hamstring some of the GOP’s top priorities just as the legislative session heats up. By law, the Yavapai County Board of Supervisors must choose a Republican to replace him.

Earlier this year, the Phoenix New Times published a copy of a case history the newspaper obtained from the Circuit Court for Baltimore City. A Maryland judicial official told the newspaper the case was expunged, and the records should not have been released.

Details of the charges against Stringer are unclear. The case summary published by New Times lists unspecified charges but does not detail the allegations. One entry says "charge is child pornography."

Stringer came under fire twice last year for comments that were widely denounced as racist, prompting Republican Gov. Doug Ducey to call for his resignation. The lawmaker has been removed from committee assignments while he awaits the outcome of the ethics probe. He has lost his role overseeing criminal justice reform efforts in the Legislature.

Last summer, video circulated on social media of him saying "there aren’t enough white kids to go around" when discussing integration in schools. Despite a backlash, he was re-elected in November.

A few weeks after the election, the New Times reported that Stringer told Arizona State University students that African Americans "don’t blend in." He also said Somali immigrants don’t look like "every other kid" as previous European immigrants do.

He apologized for his language in a speech on the House floor in January.

Source: Fox News Politics

A federal judge in Washington blocked specific Medicaid work requirements in Arkansas and Kentucky on Wednesday, though he stopped short of deciding whether any work requirements are incompatible with the program’s mission to provide health care to underprivileged people.

U.S. District Judge James E. Boasberg ruled that the Department of Health and Human Services’ approval of the Arkansas work requirement was "arbitrary and capricious because it did not address … whether and how the project would implicate the ‘core’ objective of Medicaid: the provision of medical coverage to the needy." The Obama-appointed judge invoked similar language in his ruling on the Kentucky requirement.

Work requirements are already in effect in Arkansas, but Kentucky’s program has been on hold because of lawsuits. Both states want "able-bodied" adults who get health insurance through ObamaCare’s Medicaid expansion to work, study, volunteer or participate in "community engagement" activities.

Kentucky Republican Gov. Matt Bevin said his state would appeal. Bevin has threatened to end Kentucky’s Medicaid expansion covering more than 400,000 people if work requirements are ultimately struck down.

CONGRESSIONAL REPUBLICANS RATTLED BY TRUMP’S PIVOT TO OBAMACARE FIGHT

"We have one guy in Washington who thinks he owns Kentucky," said Bevin, apparently referring to the judge. "We’re right, and we’ll be right in the end. And one guy can gum up the works if he wants, for a while, but this, too, shall pass."

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson, also a Republican, said he was disappointed by the decision and would publicly address it on Thursday.

The GOP leader of the Arkansas Senate said he doesn’t believe the ruling jeopardizes the future of Medicaid expansion, which covers more than 200,000 residents. About 18,000 have lost coverage as a result of the work requirements.

"I don’t think there’s any reason for the state to panic," said Senate President Jim Hendren, who’s also the governor’s nephew. "This is another obstacle in our path to try to do the best we can in Arkansas with the chips the federal government and the judiciary gives us."

States are traditionally allowed broad leeway to set Medicaid benefits and eligibility. Overall, Medicaid is the government’s largest health insurance program, covering about one in five Americans, ranging from many pregnant women and infants to severely disabled people and elderly nursing home residents.

Advocates for the poor say that Medicaid is a health care program and that work requirements have no place in it.

"It is nonsensical and illegal to add obstacles to Medicaid for large groups of individuals who are already working, or full-time health care providers for family members, or suffering chronic health matters," said Jane Perkins, legal director of the National Health Law Program, a nonprofit that sued the government.

"Work should not be a key to health care access."

The Trump administration isn’t giving up, said the head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

"We will continue to defend our efforts to give states greater flexibility to help low-income Americans rise out of poverty," Seema Verma said in a statement. "We believe, as have numerous past administrations, that states are the laboratories of democracy and we will vigorously support their innovative, state-driven efforts to develop and test reforms that will advance the objectives of the Medicaid program."

President Trump supports work requirements for public programs across the government. Last year, he signed an executive order directing Cabinet agencies to add or strengthen work requirements for programs including subsidized housing, food stamps and cash welfare.

HHS had already acted. Early in the administration, top officials invited states to apply for waivers that would allow Medicaid work requirements. Verma says she believes work is important to improving the health and well-being of Medicaid recipients.

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Eight states have had their requests approved, though not all have put their programs in place, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. Requests from seven others are pending. In one of those states, Virginia, a work requirement was key to getting the legislature to approve Medicaid expansion.

Nationally, some 12 million people are covered by the Medicaid expansion, a key component of former President Barack Obama’s health care law, adopted by 37 states. Officials in GOP-led states have argued that work requirements and other measures such as modest premiums are needed to ensure political acceptance for the expansion.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics


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