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Attorney General William Barr said that his handling of the Mueller report and its aftermath is rooted in a desire to defend the power of the executive branch rather than personal support for President Trump.

“I felt the rules were being changed to hurt Trump, and I thought it was damaging for the presidency over the long haul,” Barr told The Wall Street Journal in El Salvador in an interview published Monday, where he traveled last week to boost support for Trump’s policies toward the violent street gang MS-13.

“At every grave juncture the presidency has done what it is supposed to do, which is to provide leadership and direction,” Barr added. “If you destroy the presidency and make it an errand boy for Congress, we’re going to be a much weaker and more divided nation.”

Democrats have accused Barr and Trump of trying to stonewall and obstruct Congress’ oversight duties a charge that was repeated Monday after Trump directed former White House Counsel Don McGahn to defy a congressional subpoena to testify before the House Judiciary Committee. That committee voted earlier this month to hold Barr in contempt after he defied a subpoena for an unredacted version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report into Russian activities during the 2016 presidential campaign.

BARR TEASES PELOSI, ASKS IF SHE BROUGHT HER HANDCUFFS AT DC EVENT

In an interview with Fox News’ Bill Hemmer last week, Barr described that vote as “part of the usual … political circus that’s being played out. It doesn’t surprise me.”

Barr has taken the opprobrium in stride, going so far as to approach House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., at a Capitol Hill event last week and ask her if she had brought her handcuffs.

Barr told Fox News last week that he had ordered an investigation into the origins of the Russia probe because many of the answers he had gotten were “inadequate.”

BARR VOWS TO UNCOVER ‘EXACTLY WHAT HAPPENED’ WITH RUSSIA PROBE

“People have to find out what the government was doing during that period,” he told “America’s Newsroom” host Bill Hemmer. “If we’re worried about foreign influence, for the very same reason we should be worried about whether government officials abused their power and put their thumb on the scale. I’m not saying that happened but its something we have to look at.”

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Barr specifically expressed a desire to focus on developments between Election Day in 2016 and Trump’s inauguration in 2017, saying “some very strange developments” took place in that time.

“I think there’s a misconception out there that we know a lot about what happened,” he said. “The fact of the matter is Bob Mueller did not look at the government’s activities. He was looking at whether or not the Trump campaign had conspired with the Russians. But he was not going back and looking at the counterintelligence program. And we have a number of investigations underway that touch upon it.”

Fox News’ Bill Hemmer and Liam Quinn contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

The launch of a formal inquiry into the origins of the Russia investigation — being led by one of the Justice Department’s toughest prosecutors — has touched off a new round of behind-the-scenes finger-pointing among Obama administration officials who could have some explaining to do about efforts to surveil the Trump campaign.

A key dispute that flared this week concerns whether then-FBI Director James Comey or then-CIA Director John Brennan  — or both of them — pushed the unverified Steele dossier containing claims about President Trump and his relationship to Russia. The dossier’s more sensational claims were never substantiated by Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s team.

DISPUTE ERUPTS OVER WHETHER BRENNAN, COMEY PUSHED STEELE DOSSIER

“Amazing—James Comey says that in 2016, John Brennan insisted on including the dossier in their IC assessment. But Brennan says: no no, COMEY wanted to use the dossier,” North Carolina Rep. Mark Meadows, a Republican who has long demanded answers about the origins of the probe, tweeted Thursday in reference to a prior Fox News report.

Meadows added: “They know the truth is coming. And now they’re all throwing each other under the bus.”

Sources familiar with the records told Fox News that a late-2016 email chain indicated Comey told bureau subordinates that Brennan insisted the dossier be included in the intelligence community assessment on Russian interference, known as the ICA. That email chain has not been made public.

But in a statement to Fox News, a former CIA official put the blame squarely on Comey.

“Former Director Brennan, along with former [Director of National Intelligence] James Clapper, are the ones who opposed James Comey’s recommendation that the Steele Dossier be included in the intelligence report,” the official said.

Clapper previously testified that the dossier was not ultimately used in the ICA. News that Comey had briefed Trump personally on the dossier before the inauguration — purportedly to warn him of potential blackmail threats — leaked within days and opened the door for media outlets to publicize the dossier’s lurid claims.

Fox News has reached out to Comey’s legal team twice, and provided the statement from the former CIA official, but did not receive a reply on the record. Comey, who often posts on Twitter, has not commented publicly on the story.

Meanwhile, another top FBI official, in a podcast interview, acknowledged that he and others were worried that it could look like Comey was trying to blackmail Trump when he first told him about the allegations in the dossier.

EX-FBI LAWYER: OFFICIALS WERE ‘QUITE WORRIED’ COMEY APPEARED TO BE BLACKMAILING TRUMP WITH DOSSIER

On the latest episode of the Yahoo News podcast “Skullduggery” broadcast on Tuesday, Baker said he and others were so concerned about Comey briefing Trump on Jan. 6, 2017 that “analogies” were made to J. Edgar Hoover, the former FBI director who famously abused his power to blackmail individuals.

“We were quite worried about the Hoover analogies, and we were determined not to have such a disaster happen on our watch,” Baker said, hoping to convey to the incoming president that they did not want to continue the “legacy” of Hoover’s blackmailing.

The finger-pointing comes as Attorney General Bill Barr has assigned John Durham, the U.S. attorney in Connecticut, to conduct an inquiry into alleged misconduct and alleged improper government surveillance.

The Justice Department’s watchdog, Michael Horowitz, also is expected to conclude his internal review of how the dossier compiled by former British spy Christopher Steele was used to secure the original surveillance warrant for former Trump aide Carter Page in October 2016, as well as for three renewals. Horowitz’s team has questioned why the FBI considered Steele a credible source, and why the bureau seemed to use news reports to bolster Steele’s credibility.

U.S. Attorney John Huber earlier was appointed by former Attorney General Jeff Sessions to review not only alleged surveillance abuses by the Justice Department and the FBI, but also their handling of the investigation into the Clinton Foundation and other matters. The status of Huber’s work is not known.

Fox News’ Catherine Herridge, Gregg Re and Joseph A. Wulfsohn contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Radio host Howie Carr said U.S. Attorney John Durham will be very hard to “smear as a partisan” as he conducts a review of the Russia probe’s origins.

Fox News reported on Monday that Attorney General Bill Barr had assigned Durham, 68, the U.S. attorney in Connecticut, to conduct the inquiry into allegations of misconduct and possibly improper government surveillance on the Trump campaign in 2016.

US ATTORNEY JOHN DURHAM HAS BEEN REVIEWING ORIGINS OF RUSSIA PROBE ‘FOR WEEKS’: SOURCE

On “Fox & Friends” Thursday, Carr noted that Durham has worked on multiple high-profile probes, including the FBI’s handling of Boston mob boss Whitey Bulger and the CIA’s handling of terrorism suspects in custody.

He added that Durham has conducted special investigations under both Democrat-appointed and Republican-appointed attorney generals.

“He’s going to be very hard to smear as a partisan,” Carr said, pointing out that although Durham is a Republican, he was endorsed by Connecticut’s two Democratic senators when he was appointed by President Trump.

Carr said Durham’s investigation into the origins of the Russia probe has already had a “chilling effect” on some of the Justice Department and FBI officials whose conduct may be probed.

He pointed to former FBI Director James Comey, who Carr said is “lashing out” at departing Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and others, and former top FBI lawyer James Baker, who qualified his claim that everything in the Russia probe was lawful by adding, “at least based on every piece of information that I have.”

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“This is what happens in the early stages of a criminal investigation,” Carr said.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman and Jake Gibson contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Radio host Howie Carr said U.S. Attorney John Durham will be very hard to “smear as a partisan” as he conducts a review of the Russia probe’s origins.

Fox News reported on Monday that Attorney General Bill Barr had assigned Durham, 68, the U.S. attorney in Connecticut, to conduct the inquiry into allegations of misconduct and possibly improper government surveillance on the Trump campaign in 2016.

US ATTORNEY JOHN DURHAM HAS BEEN REVIEWING ORIGINS OF RUSSIA PROBE ‘FOR WEEKS’: SOURCE

On “Fox & Friends” Thursday, Carr noted that Durham has worked on multiple high-profile probes, including the FBI’s handling of Boston mob boss Whitey Bulger and the CIA’s handling of terrorism suspects in custody.

He added that Durham has conducted special investigations under both Democrat-appointed and Republican-appointed attorney generals.

“He’s going to be very hard to smear as a partisan,” Carr said, pointing out that although Durham is a Republican, he was endorsed by Connecticut’s two Democratic senators when he was appointed by President Trump.

Carr said Durham’s investigation into the origins of the Russia probe has already had a “chilling effect” on some of the Justice Department and FBI officials whose conduct may be probed.

He pointed to former FBI Director James Comey, who Carr said is “lashing out” at departing Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and others, and former top FBI lawyer James Baker, who qualified his claim that everything in the Russia probe was lawful by adding, “at least based on every piece of information that I have.”

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“This is what happens in the early stages of a criminal investigation,” Carr said.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman and Jake Gibson contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

The latest news, reduced to its starkest terms: You had your investigation, now we’re having ours.

The first investigation, relentlessly promoted by Democrats and the media, was, of course, the Mueller probe. While the report contained some damaging information about the actions of the Trump team, the bottom line was beyond dispute: no criminal charges recommended.

The new probe, long pushed by Donald Trump, Republicans and the conservative media, aims at investigating the investigators.

As first reported by The New York Times, William Barr has tapped the U.S. attorney in Connecticut, John Durham, to examine the origins of the special counsel’s probe — especially the opening of the FBI counterintelligence inquiry into the Trump campaign and Russia in 2016.

This comes on the heels of the DOJ’s inspector general investigating the wiretap applications from 2016 and political bias among FBI officials.

Obviously, the president could have declared victory after the Mueller findings and moved on. But he’s been agitating for a second investigation into what he views as — perhaps you’ve heard this before? — a partisan witch hunt.

The Times described the latest investigation as “a move that President Trump has long called for but that could anger law enforcement officials who insist that scrutiny of the Trump campaign was lawful.” I get that there are legitimate questions about how the Obama-era FBI handled the probe, about using an informant against George Papadopoulos, about the anti-Trump texts of Peter Strzok and Lisa Page. But the IG could have handled this, and what makes me uneasy is that this carries the whiff of payback.

SUBSCRIBE TO HOWIE’S MEDIA BUZZMETER PODCAST, A RIFF OF THE DAY’S HOTTEST STORIES

Trump’s appointee to run the FBI, Christopher Wray, said last week that he didn’t know of any illegal surveillance and would not call the work of his agents “spying.” For that, he’s starting to get the Sessions treatment.

SPLIT WITH BARR? FBI DIRECTOR WRAY SAYS SURVEILLANCE NOT THE SAME AS ‘SPYING’

The president tweeted that “the FBI has no leadership. The Director is protecting the same gang … that tried to overthrow the President through an illegal coup. (Recommended by previous DOJ)”.

The coup language is unfortunate. But if you view it that way, it’s not hard to conjure an image of a general surviving a military coup and then ordering the plotters jailed.

How does Wray feel that the man who tapped him to replace Jim Comey now says the bureau has no leadership? And critics who say Barr was spinning the Mueller report will now view the attorney general as doing Trump’s bidding in ordering the new probe.

Trump told reporters yesterday that the Mueller probe was “the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the people of this country” and “I am so proud of our attorney general that he is looking into it,” while adding that he didn’t know about the decision in advance.

Asked whether he has full confidence in Chris Wray, the president said, “Well, I didn’t understand his answer” on illegal surveillance. “I thought it was a ridiculous answer.”

TRUMP TAKES SWIPE AT FBI DIRECTOR WRAY FOR ‘PROTECTING’ RUSSIA PROBE ‘GANG’

The Washington Post notes that “Trump’s campaign is publicly calling for criminal investigations into former FBI officials and is making ‘spygate’ fundraising pitches, seeking to turn the tables and transform the Russia investigation into a political asset instead of a liability.”

On the other hand, even though Durham is a Trump appointee, Barr seems to have made a good choice.

Durham has been a Justice Department lawyer for nearly four decades and has conducted a number of sensitive investigations under Republican and Democratic administrations. These include the FBI probe of mobster Whitey Bulger and the CIA’s destruction of torture videotapes.

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The U.S. attorney is not being given special powers, so he’ll report to Barr rather than function as a special prosecutor.

Maybe this latest investigation will clear up these questions about the launch of the Russia investigation once and for all. But an equally likely outcome is that it’s embraced by Trump supporters and dismissed by Trump detractors, just another round in the hyperpartisanship that has tainted our law enforcement agencies.

Source: Fox News Politics

Fox News political contributor Karl Rove said Tuesday that U.S. Attorney John Durham could extend the investigation into the Russia probe’s origins well beyond the scope of Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz’s powers.

“Durham allows you to get to people who have left the government like a [former FBI Director James] Comey, like a [former FBI Deputy Director Andrew] McCabe, like a [former FBI official] Peter Strzok and others,  and he’s going to be able to get them involved in this and he has greater authority to compel testimony and documents than does the inspector general,” Rove told Fox News’ “America’s Newsroom.”

TREY GOWDY: INVESTIGATORS ASSIGNED TO EXAMINE RUSSIA PROBE ORIGINS HAVE ‘EASY ROAD MAP’

The former senior adviser to President George W. Bush pointed out that Horowitz is “constrained in who he can talk to” and can only interview people “still on the payroll of the government.”

Attorney General William Barr appointed Durham, a corruption specialist, to determine whether the DOJ engaged in “lawful and appropriate” intelligence collection efforts targeting the then-candidate Donald Trump’s campaign.

Rove told Fox News host Bill Hemmer that Durham was someone who had a reputation for taking on tough cases.

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“John Durham is a very tough, experienced career prosecutor. He literally joined the U.S. Attorney’s office in Connecticut in the late 1970s right out of law school. He has got a reputation for taking on tough challenges,” Rove said.

“This is a guy who is a straight arrow,” Rove also said. “He’s going to get to the bottom of this one way or the other.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Sean Hannity said in his “Hannity” Opening Monologue on Monday that former FBI Director James Comey “abused his power” and that there has been “mounting” evidence to that effect.

Hannity said Comey signed off on one of four Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrant applications that sought authorization to conduct surveillance on President Trump’s then-campaign adviser Carter Page.

The decision was detailed in a memo released by the House Intelligence Committee in February 2018, an act that Comey subsequently criticized as “dishonest and misleading.”

The memo stated that on October 21, 2016, the Justice Department and the FBI “sought and received” a FISA probable cause order authorizing “electronic surveillance” on Carter Page from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

Hannity said that the circumstances surrounding the FISA warrant applications were suspicious.

“Comey abused his power. The evidence against him is mounting,” Hannity said.

He said anti-Trump dossier source Christopher Steele, a former MI6 agent, reportedly “hated then-candidate Trump and was willing to do anything to take him down.”

Hannity criticized Comey for using Steele’s dossier as part of the “predicate” for the FISA warrant.

Hannity added that, in a speech in Baltimore, former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein responded to Comey’s critiques of his own personal character.

ROD ROSENSTEIN QUOTES ROBERT MUELLER IN COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS

Rosenstein told the audience that he didn’t blame Comey for being “angry,” but that the ex-lawman “seems to be acting as a partisan pundit – selling books, earning speaking fees while speculating about the strength of my character and the fate of my immortal soul.”

“Rod Rosenstein is absolutely right to slam the former disgraced FBI director,” Hannity said.

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“It’s not looking good for Mr. Super-Patriot Jim Comey,” he added. “He was a terrible FBI director.”

Hannity said that a “damning shadow” was being cast over him.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Attorney General William Barr has appointed a U.S. attorney to examine the origins of the Russia investigation and determine if intelligence collection involving the Trump campaign was “lawful and appropriate,” a person familiar with the situation told Fox News on Monday evening.

Barr has appointed John Durham, the U.S. attorney in Connecticut, to conduct the inquiry, the source said.

Durham previously has investigated law enforcement corruption, the destruction of CIA videotapes and the Boston FBI office’s relationship with mobsters. He is to continue to serve as the chief federal prosecutor in Connecticut.

In January, House Republican Reps. Jim Jordan and Mark Meadows wrote to Durham seeking a briefing, saying they had “discovered” that Durham’s office was “investigating [former FBI General Counsel James Baker” for unauthorized disclosures to the media.”

ROSENSTEIN BLASTS ‘ANGRY’ COMEY, SAYS HE’S BECOME A DISAPPOINTING PARTISAN HACK

Durham’s review would exist alongside the ongoing probe by DOJ Inspector General (IG) Michael Horowitz, who is continuing to review potential surveillance abuses by the FBI — an investigation that began last March and that Fox News is told is nearing completion.

U.S. Attorney John Durham has been assigned to probe the origins of the surveillance of the Trump campaign, a source told Fox News.

U.S. Attorney John Durham has been assigned to probe the origins of the surveillance of the Trump campaign, a source told Fox News. (Justice Department)

Republicans also have been looking for answers from U.S. Attorney for Utah John Huber, who was appointed a year ago by then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions to review not only surveillance abuses by the FBI and DOJ, but also authorities’ handling of the probe into the Clinton Foundation.

Huber, Republicans have cautioned, apparently has made little progress and has spoken to few key witnesses and whistleblowers. But, in January, then-Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker reportedly indicated at a private meeting that Huber’s work was continuing apace.

Durham’s appointment comes about a month after Barr told members of Congress he believed “spying did occur” on the Trump campaign in 2016. He later said he didn’t mean anything pejorative and was gathering a team to look into the origins of the special counsel’s investigation.

FOX NEWS EXCLUSIVE: INTERNAL FBI TEXTS SHOW DOJ PUSHED BACK ON ‘BIAS’ IN KEY FBI FISA SOURCE

In obtaining a secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrant to surveil former Trump aide Carter Page, the FBI copy-pasted directly from a disputed Washington Post opinion article to suggest the Trump campaign may have been compromised. The bureau also repeatedly assured the court that it “did not believe” British ex-spy Christopher Steele was the direct source for a Yahoo News article implicating Page in Russian collusion.

But, London court records showed that contrary to the FBI’s assessments, Steele briefed Yahoo News and other reporters in the fall of 2016 at the direction of Fusion GPS — the opposition research firm behind the dossier. Fusion GPS was retained by the Hillary Clinton campaign and Democratic National Committee (DNC), a piece of information not stated in the FISA application.

The FISA application also copied and pasted directly from a Washington Post opinion piece that claimed the Trump campaign had “worked behind the scenes” to “gut” the GOP platform on Russia and Ukraine.

Internal FBI text messages exclusively obtained by Fox News earlier this year showed that a senior DOJ official raised concerns about the bias in a key FISA warrant, but that FBI officials pressed on.

“There’s a document that’s classified that I’m gonna try to get unclassified that takes the dossier — all the pages of it — and it has verification to one side,” Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Graham Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures” this weekend. “There really is no verification, other than media reports that were generated by reporters that received the dossier.”

Graham specifically cited the report from The Hill’s John Solomon that the FBI was expressly told that Steele, the bureau’s confidenial informant, had admitted to a contact at the State Department that he was “keen” to leak his discredited dossier for purposes of influencing the 2016 election.

Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Kathleen Kavalec’s written account of her Oct. 11, 2016, meeting with Steele was apparently sent to the FBI, according to records unearthed in a transparency lawsuit by Citizens United.

Fox News’ Catherine Herridge and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Just two days after formally stepping aside as Deputy Attorney General, Rod Rosenstein delivered a commencement address Monday at the University of Baltimore School of Law quoting Robert Mueller and urging graduates to stick to “principles” even when they find themselves “standing alone.”

Rosenstein, who oversaw Mueller’s Russia investigation and drew bipartisan fire — at one point, House Republicans introduced articles of impeachment against him — specifically pointed graduates to Mueller’s comments at the College of William & Mary in 2013.

“You will face pressure to compromise on things that matter most, perhaps even to trade virtue for the appearance of virtue,” Rosenstein said. “But, you should exercise caution when uncomfortable circumstances tempt you to disregard principles.”

He continued: “As Robert Mueller once said, ‘There may come a time when you will be tested. You may find yourself standing alone, against those you thought were trusted colleagues. You may stand to lose all that you have worked for, and it may not be an easy call.'”

Mueller was hardly the only notable figure Rosenstein opted to cite. His speech also included quotes from and references to Abraham Lincoln (“Let reverence for the laws”), William Shakespeare (“Strive mightily, but eat and drink as friends”), and author Robert Fulghum (“The lesson is that with proper care, the roots will grow broad and deep, and the plant will grow tall and strong.”)

ROSENSTEIN SLAMS OBAMA ADMIN IN REMARKS JUST DAYS AHEAD OF DEPARTURE FROM DOJ

Rosenstein, 54, also offered a rare window into his personal life — and the stresses his job placed on his family.

“Before I went to Washington in 2017, my daughter asked whether I would get my picture in the newspaper,” Rosenstein said. “I said no. I told her that ‘deputy attorney general’ is a low-profile job. Nobody knows the deputy attorney general.”

Rosenstein added: “I realize that the modern media often seems to foster incivility, but lawyers have a special responsibility to practice and promote civility. The fundamental purpose of law is to provide a peaceful means to resolve disagreements, so if civility seems to be lacking in public life, that is all the more reason for lawyers to step into the breach.”

Attorney General William Barr, left, pausing as he brings Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, to the podium to ask who has the more stoic face during a farewell ceremony for Rosenstein in the Great Hall at the Department of Justice in Washington last week. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Attorney General William Barr, left, pausing as he brings Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, to the podium to ask who has the more stoic face during a farewell ceremony for Rosenstein in the Great Hall at the Department of Justice in Washington last week. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

In previous remarks late last month, while he was still deputy attorney general, Rosenstein lamented what he called the difficulty of his position, and suggested he had done the best he could under the circumstances.

“The previous administration chose not to publicize the full story about Russian computer hackers and social media trolls, and how they relate to a broader strategy to undermine America,” Rosenstein said at the Armenian Bar Association’s Public Servants Dinner. “The FBI disclosed classified evidence about the investigation to ranking legislators and their staffers. Someone selectively leaked details to the news media. The FBI director announced at a congressional hearing that there was a counterintelligence investigation that might result in criminal charges. Then, the former FBI director alleged that the president pressured him to close the investigation, and the president denied that the conversation occurred. So, that happened.”

Rosenstein compared his tenure to “the story about firefighters who found a man on a burning bed. When they asked how the fire started, he replied, ‘I don’t know. It was on fire when I lay down on it.'”

Attorney General Bill Barr last Friday said he named Ed O’Callaghan to temporarily serve as acting deputy attorney general in the wake of Rosenstein’s departure from the Justice Department.

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Congressional Republicans have accused Rosenstein of intentionally withholding documents and information from Congress, failure to comply with congressional subpoenas and abuse of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA).

A DOJ watchdog review of the department’s FISA practices, among other issues, is expected to be completed within weeks.

Source: Fox News Politics

Attorney General Bill Barr on Friday said he named Ed O’Callaghan to temporarily serve as acting deputy attorney general in the wake of Rod Rosenstein’s departure from the Justice Department.

O’Callaghan, who served as Rosenstein’s principal deputy, will be the second in command at the Justice Department until the Senate confirms a new deputy. Jeffrey Rosen has been nominated, but not yet confirmed, for deputy attorney general.

DEPUTY AG ROD ROSENSTEIN SUBMITS RESIGNATION

“Ed is a top-notch attorney whose intellect, competence, judgment, and experience are evident in every task he takes on,” Barr said in a statement. “That is why I have asked him to serve as the Acting Deputy Attorney General until the Senate confirms Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein’s successor, Jeffrey Rosen. I am confident that Ed will be an excellent Acting Deputy Attorney General during this interim period.”

Rosenstein, who frequently found himself in the political crosshairs due to his role in the special counsel’s Russia probe and whose departure has long been expected, submitted his resignation last month to President Trump, effective May 11.

Rosenstein, 54, previously served as deputy assistant attorney general and U.S. attorney. He stayed at the Justice Department until the completion of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe.

Fox News’ Jake Gibson contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics


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