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Two ranking executives inside the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office have submitted their resignations — including State’s Attorney Kim Foxx’s chief ethics officer, April Perry, whom Foxx cited as the person who advised her to “recuse” herself from the Jussie Smollett case that has rocked the Chicago office, Fox News learned Thursday.

Mark Rotert, the director of the office’s Conviction Integrity Unit, has also submitted his resignation, according to a Foxx spokesperson. Perry and Rotert are scheduled to work their last days on the job in May.

“While I feel lucky to have been able to spend the last 15 years of my career in public service, I am looking forward to my next endeavor in the private sector where I have the opportunity to continue to work toward increasing the safety of our community,” Perry wrote in an April 15 letter obtained by Fox News.

Chicago’s top prosecutor has been criticized for how she handled Smollett’s criminal case — including her questionable recusal and how her office suddenly dropped the charges against the 36-year-old “Empire” actor on March 26.

A grand jury indicted the actor on 16 counts in early March. Foxx’s office dropped the charges about three weeks later, explaining that Smollett was offered “deferred prosecution” because he forfeited his $10,000 bond and performed some community service. Much of the legal community has rebuked Foxx’s explanation including the National District Attorneys Association and the Illinois Prosecutors Bar Association which concluded that Foxx “fundamentally misled the public” and should have recused her entire office from the case.

STATE’S ATTORNEY KIM FOXX REPORTEDLY CALLS JUSSIE SMOLLETT ‘WASHED UP CELEB WHO LIED TO COPS’ IN TEXT MESSAGE

Last February, during the height of the investigation into Smollett’s claim that he was a victim of a hate crime, the state’s attorney’s office released a statement saying Foxx recused herself from investigating Smollett “out of an abundance of caution” because Foxx had discussed the case with a Smollett family member. “Shortly after the incident occurred in late January, State’s Attorney Foxx had conversations with a family member of Jussie Smollett about the incident and their concerns, and facilitated a connection to the Chicago Police Department who were investigating the incident,” a statement from the office read.

In media interviews, Foxx revealed it was Perry who advised her to recuse herself and touted Perry as the office’s first ethics officer. However, her office later had to clarify that Foxx recused herself only in the “colloquial” sense — not what was accepted as the standard legal recusal which would involve her entire office, and the appointment of a special prosecutor.

On March 8, it became public that Smollett was indicted on 16 felony counts for allegedly lying to police over a staged assault against himself earlier this year — after discussing the move with Perry.

Foxx has stood by her office’s decisions. She invited the Cook County inspector general’s office to investigate the case, and the IG confirmed to Fox News that it was.

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President Trump said last month he’s asked for a federal review of Foxx’s decisions.

Rotert, meanwhile, told the Chicago Sun-Times that the Smollett controversy “had absolutely zero percent to do with my decision.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

The so-called “Second City” may eventually become the next state, after frustration regarding Chicago‘s influence over politics in Illinois.

A group of state Republican lawmakers recently signed on to legislation proposing the nation’s third-largest city become the 51st state.

“It’s more of a frustration of the policies than the true belief that Chicago and Illinois would be better off as separate states,” Rep. C.D. Davidsmeyer told the State Journal-Register. “I don’t believe that Chicago and the state of Illinois should be separated. Our relationship is mutually beneficial.”

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Davidsmeyer said he co-sponsored the legislation to spark a discussion about how the city’s politics impact rural residents in downstate Illinois.

“The reality is the city of Chicago is competing with New York City and L.A. and San Francisco, and (downstate is) competing against rural Indiana and rural Missouri,” he told the State Journal-Register. “The policies that come down from Chicago are actually pushing our economic opportunity away.”

A central Illinois lawmaker is sponsoring legislation proposing the separation of Chicago from Illinois to spark discussion about the overarching influence of the city in state politics.

A central Illinois lawmaker is sponsoring legislation proposing the separation of Chicago from Illinois to spark discussion about the overarching influence of the city in state politics. (AP)

Forming a new state from a portion of a current state requires endorsement from Congress and the state legislature, according to the U.S. Constitution.

The bill, HR0101, was introduced in February by state Rep. Brad Halbrook, who said he supports removing the city of 2.7 million people from Illinois because of differing views on issues such as abortion and gun rights.

“Our traditional family values seem to be under attack at every angle,” Halbrook told the Journal-Register. “We are trying to drive the discussion to get people at the table to say these are not our values down here.”

Part of the bill states that: “Numerous counties in the southern and central parts of Illinois are approving resolutions to become sanctuary counties for gun owners, while the City of Chicago has some of the strictest gun laws in the country.”

Halbrook co-sponsored a similar resolution filed last year that failed. This year’s attempt has even less of a chance of succeeding and getting out of the Rules Committee in the Democratic-controlled legislature as Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker and the leaders of the state House and Senate are all Democrats from Chicago.

“When you have a large population center that seems to control the agenda for the rest of the state, it just kind of creates some issues,” he told the paper.

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A report in February from the University of Illinois at Chicago found that Chicago was still the top in the ranking of the most corrupt big cities in the nation and Illinois the third most corrupt state in the nation.

An Illinois lawmaker says that Chicago needs to recognize how its policies impact rural residents of the state.

An Illinois lawmaker says that Chicago needs to recognize how its policies impact rural residents of the state. (iStock)

The tension between urban and rural areas isn’t exclusive to Illinois. The same has occurred in New York and California, according to a paper published last year by the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute at Southern Illinois University.

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John Jackson, a visiting professor at the institute and co-author of the paper, told the Journal-Register it was odd that the resentment has persisted in Illinois, but many politicians from southern and central parts of the state often “run against Chicago.”

“We ought to have leaders who get together and coalesce for the good of the state,” he told the paper.

Davidsmeyer said since the resolution has been introduced, it’s spurred a greater discussion about how big an influence Chicago politics has over Illinois.

“People say Chicago’s a huge economy, there’s no way you can survive without them, (but) I have people on the other side saying Chicago’s killing us with their policies, we need to separate,” he said. “I’m one of the people in the middle saying let’s see both sides of it.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

President Trump and a California mayor traded barbs over Twitter on Saturday, prompted by the president’s repeated threats to release detained immigrants into “sanctuary cities.”

The exchange between Trump and Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf also appeared triggered, at least in part, by recent New York Times articles about the president’s immigration policies.

“So interesting to see the Mayor of Oakland and other Sanctuary Cities NOT WANT our currently ‘detained immigrants’ after release due to the ridiculous court ordered 20 day rule,” Trump tweeted.

ANTI-TRUMP OAKLAND MAYOR INSISTS SHE ‘DID THE RIGHT THING’ IN TIPPING OFF ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS ABOUT ICE RAID

Schaaf fired back, saying: “It’s time to stop fanning hate and division @realDonaldTrump – I’ve been consistent and clear: #Oakland welcomes all, no matter where you came from or how you got here.”

Trump fired off another tweet soon after: “Just out: The USA has the absolute legal right to have apprehended illegal immigrants transferred to Sanctuary Cities. We hereby demand that they be taken care of at the highest level, especially by the State of California, which is well known or [sic] its poor management & high taxes!”

In 2017, California passed a “sanctuary state” law limiting cooperation between local authorities and federal immigration officials. Administration officials said Trump’s proposal to dump undocumented immigrants in “sanctuary cities” was floated and rejected. Trump insists he is still giving the idea strong consideration, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Schaaf told NPR on Saturday that her city would accept a busload of 5,000 migrants if it had to.

“My job as a mayor is to welcome people,” she said. “I don’t build walls. It’s our job to welcome everyone into our city, ensure their safety, ensure that their families can thrive. And that is my job no matter where those people came from or how they got there.”

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“This is about an outrageous abuse of power,” she continued. “The idea that you could use human beings, families as instruments of political payback to use public resources to exact retribution on your political enemies.”

Mayors in other cities have said they are willing to take in migrants.

“We have people who are routinely coming to this city. We have a whole infrastructure that’s built up to make sure that their rights are protected while the city of Chicago has, under the current administration, provided funding for various groups to help support asylum seekers and other people that are going through the immigration court system. I expect it will continue, if not expand upon, those kinds of resources,” said Chicago Mayor-elect Lori Lightfoot.

Source: Fox News Politics

Ohio Gov. Bill DeWine signed into law on Thursday one of the nation’s toughest restrictions on abortion.

The Republican governor signed the so-called “heartbeat” bill after the state legislature approved the legislation on Wednesday.

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John Kasich, DeWine’s Republican predecessor, vetoed the measure twice while in office. He said such a law would create a costly court battle and likely be found unconstitutional.

Before DeWine signed the legislation Thursday, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) said they were preparing a constitutional challenge to the law on behalf of Pre-Term Cleveland and three other Ohio abortion clinics.

“Similar versions of this unconstitutional abortion ban stand 0-4 in federal court. Soon to be 0-5,” the Ohio chapter tweeted, while the ACLU said: “We’ll see you in court.”

The bill — which makes no exceptions for rape or incest — is among the most restrictive abortion measures in the country.

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Other states like Florida, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississipi, Missouri, South Carolina and West Virginia are among the states that have either passed “heartbeat” legislation or are hoping to do so.

This comes as states like New York, New Mexico, Maryland, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Virginia, among other Democratic-leaning states, are supporting bills that allow abortion up to the moment of birth.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

With the tax-filing deadline just days away, California residents are worried that a slew of proposed levies on everything from soft drinks to water to tires and car batteries could soon see even more money going out of their pockets in the state that already has the nation’s highest income tax.

As Californians grapple with that 13.3 percent income tax – and some leaner-than-usual refunds this year due to the recent federal tax overhaul – lawmakers in Sacramento are looking at a range of other revenue sources. Members of the legislature’s Democratic supermajority argue that these new taxes are vital to shore up the state coffers and to provide crucial services such as repairing crumbling infrastructure, cleaning up toxic wells and fighting obesity.

ELECTRIC SCOOTERS BEING DUMPED IN CALIFORNIA LAKE, AS POPULARITY EXPLODES 

Overall, the California Tax Foundation has added up more than $6.2 billion worth of tax increase proposals pending in the state legislature, with that number expected to rise as bills are amended.

But the state’s minority Republican leaders bemoan these new proposals, arguing that Californians are already burdened by some of the highest taxes in the country and the new charges would only worsen the state’s mounting affordability and housing challenges.

“We have the highest gas tax in the nation and the majority party has gone as far as taxing our air,” California State Senate Republican Leader Shannon Grove said in a statement to Fox News. “Now, they are proposing to tax our water, soda, tires, and more. Higher taxes won’t solve California’s affordability and housing problems, and they will only make things worse.”

A spokesperson for the California Democratic Party declined to comment to Fox News, instead directing questions to lawmakers who proposed the pieces of legislation.

One of the most controversial proposals to come out of Sacramento this year is a proposal from Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom to tax drinking water in order to clean up contaminated water in the state’s low-income and rural areas.

He told reporters earlier this year that the lack of access to safe drinking water in the state is a “disgrace.”

The proposal, which if enacted would levy a fee of between 95 cents and $10 a month on residents’ water bills depending on meter readings, has divided members of Newsom’s own party. Tax and fee increases require support from two-thirds of lawmakers and, despite Democrats holding roughly 75 percent of the legislative seats in the state, some representatives from moderate and agricultural strongholds balk at the water tax idea.

State Sen. Anna Caballero has proposed using the state’s $22 billion surplus to create a trust fund to pay for water improvements. The move by Caballero has been championed by taxpayer associations in the state.

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“A state-imposed tax would not only be an outlier from a national perspective, it would be for California as well,” John Coupal, the president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association (HJTA), said in a statement. “Moreover, there are other ways to fund the one-time $150 million cost of necessary water system improvements.

Coupal added: “Not only is there federal funding specifically available for this purpose, California has passed several statewide bonds that have allocated hundreds of millions of dollars for clean water infrastructure improvements.”

Along with water, another liquid has come under the scrutiny of lawmakers in California: soda.

Following a national trend – and concerns over the risks of obesity and diabetes – Democratic lawmakers in the state have proposed a tax on the sugary beverages, which include soft drinks, sweetened iced teas, coffees and sports drinks. While details have remained vague on how much these taxes would be, Democratic Assemblyman Richard Bloom has supported a 20-cent-per-ounce tax in previous proposals.

“We have ignored this crisis for too long,” Bloom said in January. “We are standing on the edge of a cliff and addressing this health crisis requires a multi-pronged approach like the one you see today.”

A recent Los Angeles Times report highlighting some of these tax proposals noted that polls show residents already think they’re overtaxed. Republicans and representatives of the beverage industry argue that the tax would unfairly hurt businesses and consumers, particularly those in lower-income communities.

The “burden of paying the tax would disproportionately fall on some groups relative to others,” said Steven Maviglio, a spokesman for the American Beverage Association.

Besides beverages, Democrats are looking to pass Assembly Bill 18, which among other things looks to tax the sale of handguns and semiautomatic weapons in order to generate funding for gun control programs.

The bill, which was sponsored by Democratic Assemblyman Marc Levine, would implement “an excise tax on the sales of handguns and semiautomatic rifles” and then hand over the resulting revenue to the California Violence Intervention and Prevention Grant Program (CalVIP).

“California needs to bolster violence prevention initiatives so that they are commensurate with our state’s tough gun laws and as effective as violence prevention programs of other states,” Levine said in a statement earlier this month.

California already has some of the toughest gun control laws in the country and, beginning in 2019, state ammunition dealers will be required to maintain logs of all sales – including those of bullets. The state has already restricted online sales of bullets so they can only be delivered to licensed dealers and not someone’s home.

The gun-tax legislation has drawn heavy criticism from gun-rights and hunting groups.

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In an effort to curb opioid addiction and fund drug treatment programs, lawmakers in California have introduced a bill that would impose a one-cent-per-milligram surcharge on prescription opioids sold in the state.

“California’s opioid epidemic has cost state taxpayers millions and the lives of too many of our sons and daughters,” Democratic Assemblyman Kevin McCarty said in a statement. “We must do more to help these individuals find hope and sobriety. This plan will provide counties with critical resources needed to curb the deadly cycle of opioid and heroin addiction in California.”

In the state with the most drivers in the U.S., lawmakers are also looking to tax parts of automobiles to fund other government programs and initiatives.

In February, Democratic Assemblyman Chris Holden proposed a $1.75 fee on every new tire put on a car, while in December another bill was proposed to levy a $1 fee on every lead-acid battery made by a manufacturer and sold in the state until 2022. The tire tax is estimated to generate $57 million to pay for stormwater cleanup.

There is also a proposal to tax oil and gas extraction in the state, which would not only put California in line with every other major oil-producing state in the U.S., but would bring in an estimated $1.5 billion a year.

While lawmakers supporting these moves say they will improve the lives of all Californians and help the state maintain its large surplus, critics say all they do is allow the state to spend more money at the expense of working residents.

“As they spend more and more money, we raise the cost of living on everyone in the state,” Will Swaim, the president of the California Policy Center, told Fox News.

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President Trump on Wednesday signed two executive orders that will make it harder for states to block the construction of oil and gas pipelines and other energy projects due to environmental concerns.

Coming on the heels of officials in Washington state and New York using permitting processes to stop new energy projects in recent years – and at the urging of some industry leaders – Trump’s executive order will speed up the construction of oil and gas pipelines across the country.

“My action today will cut through the destructive permitting and denials,” Trump said during the signing of the executive orders at the International Union of Operating Engineers International Training and Education Center, a union-run facility in Crosby, Texas. “Under this administration, we’ve ended the war on American energy.”

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“It will take no more than 60 days,” Trump said of the approval process for new pipelines, “and the president, not the bureaucracy, will make the final decision.”

While the move was greeted warmly by members of the country’s oil and gas industries, it is likely to rankle some more traditional conservative lawmakers – including several Republican governors – worried about the federal government impinging on individual state rights and governance. The White House has sought to stave off any discord by arguing that the order is not meant to take power away from the states, but to ensure that state actions follow the intent of the Clean Water Act.

Trade groups representing the oil and gas industry applauded the orders and said greater access to natural gas benefits families and the environment.

“When states say ‘no’ to the development of natural gas pipelines, they force utilities to curb safe and affordable service and refuse access to new customers, including new businesses,” said Karen Harbert, president and CEO at the American Gas Association.

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Trump’s move comes less than a week after nearly a dozen business groups told EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler that the environmental review and permitting process for energy infrastructure projects “has become a target for environmental activists and states that oppose the production and use of fossil fuels.”

The groups said in an April 5 letter that individual states shouldn’t be able to use provisions of the Clear Air Act “to dictate national policy, thereby harming other states and the national interest and damaging cooperative federalism.”

Washington state blocked the building of a coal terminal in 2017, saying there were too many major harmful impacts including air pollution, rail safety and vehicle traffic.

New York regulators stopped a natural gas pipeline, saying it failed to meet standards to protect streams, wetlands and other water resources. Under Section 401 of the Clean Water Act, companies must get certification from the state before moving ahead with an energy project.

One of Trump’s planned executive orders calls for the Environmental Protection Agency to consult with states, tribes and others before issuing new guidance and rules for states on how to comply with the law.

Environmental groups described Trump’s order as an effort to short-circuit a state’s ability to review complicated projects, putting at risk a state’s ability to protect drinking water supplies and wildlife.

“The Trump Administration’s proposal would trample on state authority to protect waters within their own borders,” said Jim Murphy, senior counsel for the National Wildlife Federation.

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The private Center for Biological Diversity said Wednesday’s actions would mark the fourth time Trump has used executive orders to streamline permits for fossil-fuel infrastructure.

“Trump’s developing an addiction to executive orders that rubberstamp these climate-killing projects,” said Brett Hartl, government affairs director at the center.

The second executive order Trump signed on Wednesday streamlines the process for energy infrastructure that crosses international borders.

Currently, the secretary of state has the authority to issue permits for cross-border infrastructure such as pipelines. The executive order clarifies that the president will make the decision on whether to issue such permits.

The move follows Trump’s decision last month to issue a new presidential permit for the long-stalled Keystone XL oil pipeline — two years after he first approved it and more than a decade after it was first proposed.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Ohio’s so-called “heartbeat” abortion bill was approved by the state legislature on Wednesday and is now headed to Republican Gov. Mike DeWine’s desk.

The House approved the measure 56-39, and later, the Senate agreed to House changes, 18-13. DeWine, who took office in January, has said he plans to sign the bill.

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DeWine’s predecessor, Republican John Kasich, vetoed the bill twice. He said such a law would create a costly court battle and likely be found unconstitutional.

The bill — which makes no exceptions for rape or incest — is among the most restrictive abortion measures in the country.

In addition to Ohio, Florida, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississipi, Missouri, South Carolina and West Virginia are among the states that have either passed “heartbeat” legislation or are hoping to do so.

This comes as states like New York, New Mexico, Maryland, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Virginia, among other Democratic-leaning states, are supporting bills that allow abortion up to the moment of birth.

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The earliest bans on heartbeat abortion, in Iowa and North Carolina, have been blocked by the courts. Three more states — Mississippi, Kentucky and Georgia — have more recently passed bills amid growing national momentum.

Fox News’ Talia Kaplan and Caleb Parke and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

A Florida housing agency paid $3,650 to a consultant to teach their boss to be nice and stop being abusive to his staff.

St. Petersburg Housing Authority CEO Tony Love came under fire amid revelations of complaints made by senior staffers who claim that he acted inappropriately by shouting and demeaning them.

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To fix the problem of a raucous boss, the agency decided to fork over $3,650 in 2017 to pay for a five-hour meeting with a consultant, the Tampa Bay Times reported.

Love reportedly admitted during the meeting that he yelled at his staffers and even once forced them to do work that wasn’t related to the agency.

The consultant then advised Love to cease criticizing employees while surrounded by others and stop trying to become friends with owners of outside firms paid to work for the agency, the newspaper reported.

But it appears that the money spent on the consultant was wasted as Love was accused of abusive behavior just four days after the meeting. Robin Adams, the authority’s asset management officer, alleged that Love bullied and harassed her.

“Mr. Love has consistently verbally abused, harassed and degraded me and other senior staff members, especially female staff members, through one-way interrogations, baseless chastising, insults and bullying.”

— Robin Adams, the authority’s asset management officer

“Mr. Love has consistently verbally abused, harassed and degraded me and other senior staff members, especially female staff members, through one-way interrogations, baseless chastising, insults and bullying,” Adams’ complaint reportedly read, adding that she had to receive counseling to deal with the stress stemming from Love’s behavior.

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The Housing Authority CEO has been under fire ever since the first complaints alleging abuse started to roll in.

Love was also criticized after the revelations that he lived rent-free for nine months in an apartment for low-income families, prompting the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to send a notice of violation to the agency, according to the Times. He also approved agency funds to revamp the apartment and even pay his electric bills.

Authority spokeswoman Michelle Ligon told the newspaper that the consultant worked as a “coaching exercise” to inspire staffers to embrace new ideas.

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“The effectiveness of team building, through consensus, is challenging but not impossible,” she said, “as shown by virtue of the compelling fact that in a very short period of time, the agency has transitioned in management, operations, and industry matters.”

Source: Fox News Politics

The Texas Senate gave a green light on Monday to a bill promoting a “culture of life” in the state that mandates doctors performing abortions to treat babies who are born alive during the procedure.

While it remains especially rare for infants to survive the abortion procedure, Republicans legislators say that in the event of such occasion, doctors must do everything to save the life of the infant.

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“If it’s one life, one life out of a million, it’s worth saving,” said state Sen. Lois Kolkhorst, R-Brenham, the Austin American-Statesman quoted as saying.

“If it’s one life, one life out of a million, it’s worth saving.”

— State Sen. Lois Kolkhorst

The bill states that doctors must “render aid, to do all they can to save that child” following the abortion, she added.

The bill also imposes penalties for those doctors who oppose treating the infant abortion survivors, including a third-degree felony and a prison sentence of two to 10 years.

The Texas attorney general could also sue such doctors and collect a civil penalty of “not less than $100,000,” the newspaper reported.

Some Democrats came out against the measure, saying the law isn’t needed because Texas already has strict abortion laws and doesn’t allow abortion past 20 weeks. A fetus up to 20 weeks old won’t be able to survive outside the womb, state Sen. Nathan Johnson said.

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“Is this about protecting life, or is this about persecuting the physician, or harassing the physician, or intimidating the physician?” Johnson was quoted as saying.

“Is this about protecting life, or is this about persecuting the physician, or harassing the physician, or intimidating the physician?”

— Democratic state Sen. Nathan Johnson

“I don’t see this bill as truly being aimed at a real problem, at a real threat,” he added. “What I see it aimed at is physicians who want to practice their own profession consistent with their own beliefs and the constitutional rights of their patients.”

The state Senate gave initial approval of the bill based on party lines, except for one Democrat who voted in favor of the measure.

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The bill is still facing a vote in the Senate this week and, if approved, will be then sent to the state House for further approval.

Source: Fox News Politics

California Democrats approved a bill last week that will force health clinics on college campuses to provide abortion pills.

Senate Bill 24, or the “College Student Right to Access Act,” was approved in a 7-3 vote last Wednesday by the California State Senate Health Committee.

Former Gov. Jerry Brown vetoed the same bill in October. He argued that abortion services were already “widely available off-campus,” making the bill unnecessary.

But state Sen. Connie Leyva, the bill’s chief sponsor, argued that “students should not have to travel off campus or miss class or work responsibilities in order to receive care that can easily be provided at a student health center.”

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At the time, Gavin Newsom, the former lieutenant governor who succeeded Brown as governor in January, told the San Francisco Chronicle that he “would have supported that [bill]” and subscribes to “Planned Parenthood and NARAL’s position on that.”

Newsom’s outspoken position has assured the bill’s proponents of its guaranteed passage.

According to the legislation, the bill would kick in beginning 2023 and would require $10.2 million in private funds to cover equipment and training, the Washington Times reported.

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Per California law, abortion is covered by health insurance policies. Health clinics on college campuses offer birth control services but not the abortion pill itself.

Opponents argue that the bill will turn colleges into “abortion vendors,” and that students will inevitably go up to cover the costs. Others are concerned about the health risks involved.

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To become law, the bill must pass through the state Senate’s education and appropriations committees before a full Senate vote. But with Democrats controlling both chambers, the bill’s passage is all but guaranteed.

Source: Fox News Politics


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