fox-news/us/crime/cold-case

A Tennessee man was arrested Wednesday in connection with the brutal 1986 murder of 38-year-old Eveline Aguilar, officials said.

Danny Lynn Emitt, 50, is accused of murdering Aguilar on July 14, 1986. Her body was found in a Winter Park, Florida, apartment with multiple stab wounds on her upper body and hands, police said. Officials also concluded she may have been sexually assaulted.

SERIAL KILLER PUT TO DEATH FOR 1984 FLORIDA MURDER SPREE THAT CLAIMED 10 WOMEN’S LIVES

A warrant was issued for Emitt’s arrest after samples from the 33-year-old murder case were entered into a national database and Emitt was revealed to be a match, according to Knox News. Emitt was in the database because he had submitted DNA for an unrelated case in 2005, the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release.

Danny Emitt was arrested in the cold-case murder of Eveline Aguilar.

Danny Emitt was arrested in the cold-case murder of Eveline Aguilar. (Knox County Sheriff’s Office)

“There is no perfect ending, but this is as good as we can get – holding the person that’s responsible accountable for their actions,” Seminole County Sheriff Dennis Lemma said at a news conference Thursday, according to the Orlando Sentinel.

Lemma said at least 50 people had been interviewed in the case before Emitt’s arrest.

Eveline Aguilar was found dead in her Florida apartment.

Eveline Aguilar was found dead in her Florida apartment. (Seminole County Sheriff’s Office)

Emitt had been arrested more than 30 times in connection with burglaries, possession of firearms and possession of knives, according to Lemma. Knox News reported he’d also been convicted of driving under the influence and driving without a license.

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In the Aguilar case, Emitt was charged with first-degree premeditated murder and burglary. Knox News reported Emitt was booked into the Roger D. Wilson Detention Facility in Tennessee, where he awaits extradition to Florida.

Source: Fox News National

A Florida man was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison for his wife’s cold-case murder — a crime their son witnessed when he was only 3 years old and helped crack as an adult.

“Daddy shot Mommy,” the boy told a child welfare worker in 1993 after the death of his 23-year-old mother Bonnie Haim in Jacksonville, according to an arrest affidavit.

Just over two decades later, in 2014, a 24-year-old Aaron Fraser dug up his mom’s remains in the backyard of his childhood home.

MAN GUILTY OF KILLING WIFE AFTER SON FINDS BODY YEARS LATER

The gruesome discovery led to the arrest of 52-year-old Michael Haim, who was found guilty of the murder in April.

Michael Haim was sentenced to life behind bars for the cold-case murder of his wife Bonnie Haim in 1993

Michael Haim was sentenced to life behind bars for the cold-case murder of his wife Bonnie Haim in 1993 (Fox 30 Jacksonville)

His sentence was meted out in Duval County Court.

“For 26 years, we wanted justice. And now we have it,” Bonnie Haim’s sister, Liz Peak said after the sentencing, according to WJXT-TV. “We got justice. But we don’t have Bonnie.”

MAN GUILTY OF KILLING WIFE AFTER SON FINDS BODY YEARS LATER

Fraser, who was adopted after the murder, stood behind his aunt as she delivered her remarks.

“I always knew my mom was buried, I just didn’t know where,” Fraser said last week at a pre-sentencing hearing, according to FOX30 Jacksonville

He was awarded his childhood home in a wrongful death lawsuit against his father.

A water leak led him to dig up the backyard searing for the source, and, under a concrete slab, he found the badly decomposed remains. DNA tests confirmed the remains were those of Bonnie Haim and a medical examiner concluded she died from a homicide “by unspecified means,” according to the arrest affidavit.

Family portrait of the Haim family before Bonnie Haim's murder.

Family portrait of the Haim family before Bonnie Haim’s murder. (Fox 30 Jacksonville)

A spent shell casing found where Bonnie Haim was buried was the same type of caliber as a rifle that Haim owned, the affidavit said.

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At his trial, Haim testified in his own defense, telling the jury that he loved his wife and that he would never hurt her.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

A Florida man was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison for his wife’s cold-case murder — a crime their son witnessed when he was only 3 years old and helped crack as an adult.

“Daddy shot Mommy,” the boy told a child welfare worker in 1993 after the death of his 23-year-old mother Bonnie Haim in Jacksonville, according to an arrest affidavit.

Just over two decades later, in 2014, a 24-year-old Aaron Fraser dug up his mom’s remains in the backyard of his childhood home.

MAN GUILTY OF KILLING WIFE AFTER SON FINDS BODY YEARS LATER

The gruesome discovery led to the arrest of 52-year-old Michael Haim, who was found guilty of the murder in April.

Michael Haim was sentenced to life behind bars for the cold-case murder of his wife Bonnie Haim in 1993

Michael Haim was sentenced to life behind bars for the cold-case murder of his wife Bonnie Haim in 1993 (Fox 30 Jacksonville)

His sentence was meted out in Duval County Court.

“For 26 years, we wanted justice. And now we have it,” Bonnie Haim’s sister, Liz Peak said after the sentencing, according to WJXT-TV. “We got justice. But we don’t have Bonnie.”

MAN GUILTY OF KILLING WIFE AFTER SON FINDS BODY YEARS LATER

Fraser, who was adopted after the murder, stood behind his aunt as she delivered her remarks.

“I always knew my mom was buried, I just didn’t know where,” Fraser said last week at a pre-sentencing hearing, according to FOX30 Jacksonville

He was awarded his childhood home in a wrongful death lawsuit against his father.

A water leak led him to dig up the backyard searing for the source, and, under a concrete slab, he found the badly decomposed remains. DNA tests confirmed the remains were those of Bonnie Haim and a medical examiner concluded she died from a homicide “by unspecified means,” according to the arrest affidavit.

Family portrait of the Haim family before Bonnie Haim's murder.

Family portrait of the Haim family before Bonnie Haim’s murder. (Fox 30 Jacksonville)

A spent shell casing found where Bonnie Haim was buried was the same type of caliber as a rifle that Haim owned, the affidavit said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

At his trial, Haim testified in his own defense, telling the jury that he loved his wife and that he would never hurt her.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

A second Stanford University decades-old cold case has been linked to a man who was arrested six months ago through DNA.

Leslie Perlov, a Stanford grad, and Janet Taylor, the daughter of a Stanford football coach, were killed 13 months apart in 1973 and 1974. They were each strangled and last seen leaving the Stanford campus. Both were 21.

On Thursday, John Getreu, 74, was charged with Taylor’s murder — six months after he was charged with Perlov’s.

His rap sheet also includes convictions for the rape and murder of a 16-year-old girl in Germany 55 years ago and for the rape of a woman in California in 1975, officials said.

CONVICTED SERIAL KILLER SAMUEL LITTLE MAY BE CONNECTED TO COLD CASE MURDERS IN LOUISIANA, OFFICIAL SAYS

The latest charges were brought by the San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office, which said in a news release that its homicide investigators always believed the Taylor and Perlov killings were connected.

The Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office investigated the Perlov case.

John Getreu, was charged Thursday with killing Janet Taylor, right, in 1974, six months after he allegedly killed Leslie Perlov. Both women were last seen leaving the campus of Stanford University. 

John Getreu, was charged Thursday with killing Janet Taylor, right, in 1974, six months after he allegedly killed Leslie Perlov. Both women were last seen leaving the campus of Stanford University.  (San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office )

“For many years, both killings remained unsolved despite the sincere efforts of seasoned investigators,” the news release said.

The break came when Santa Clara investigators submitted DNA from the Perlov crime scene to the genealogy website GEDMatch.

MAN CHARGED WITH 1998 COLD-CASE MURDER OF SON FOUND UNDER BILLBOARD

Through further investigation, they determined the DNA belonged to Getreu of Hayward, Calif., the news release said.

After his arrest in November, San Mateo investigators found DNA matching Getreu’s on clothing worn by Taylor, according to the news release.

“The break that Santa Clara County came up with from their crime lab was critical to us being able to solve this case,” Assistant San Mateo County Sheriff Gregory Rothaus said, according to the San Jose Mercury-News.

Rothaus was also quoted as saying, “Law enforcement is not giving up on victims and we have new DNA technology that is a great tool for us.”

Source: Fox News National

A second Stanford University decades-old cold case has been linked to a man who was arrested six months ago through DNA.

Leslie Perlov, a Stanford grad, and Janet Taylor, the daughter of a Stanford football coach, were killed 13 months apart in 1973 and 1974. They were each strangled and last seen leaving the Stanford campus. Both were 21.

On Thursday, John Getreu, 74, was charged with Taylor’s murder — six months after he was charged with Perlov’s.

His rap sheet also includes convictions for the rape and murder of a 16-year-old girl in Germany 55 years ago and for the rape of a woman in California in 1975, officials said.

CONVICTED SERIAL KILLER SAMUEL LITTLE MAY BE CONNECTED TO COLD CASE MURDERS IN LOUISIANA, OFFICIAL SAYS

The latest charges were brought by the San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office, which said in a news release that its homicide investigators always believed the Taylor and Perlov killings were connected.

The Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office investigated the Perlov case.

John Getreu, was charged Thursday with killing Janet Taylor, right, in 1974, six months after he allegedly killed Leslie Perlov. Both women were last seen leaving the campus of Stanford University. 

John Getreu, was charged Thursday with killing Janet Taylor, right, in 1974, six months after he allegedly killed Leslie Perlov. Both women were last seen leaving the campus of Stanford University.  (San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office )

“For many years, both killings remained unsolved despite the sincere efforts of seasoned investigators,” the news release said.

The break came when Santa Clara investigators submitted DNA from the Perlov crime scene to the genealogy website GEDMatch.

MAN CHARGED WITH 1998 COLD-CASE MURDER OF SON FOUND UNDER BILLBOARD

Through further investigation, they determined the DNA belonged to Getreu of Hayward, Calif., the news release said.

After his arrest in November, San Mateo investigators found DNA matching Getreu’s on clothing worn by Taylor, according to the news release.

“The break that Santa Clara County came up with from their crime lab was critical to us being able to solve this case,” Assistant San Mateo County Sheriff Gregory Rothaus said, according to the San Jose Mercury-News.

Rothaus was also quoted as saying, “Law enforcement is not giving up on victims and we have new DNA technology that is a great tool for us.”

Source: Fox News National

A convicted serial killer who has confessed to 90 murders and was known for sketching portraits of his victims may be linked to even more unsolved killings in Louisiana, according to the police chief of a town where two of the slayings took place.

Samuel Little, who is already serving a life sentence for murdering three women in California, made the confessions last year while being held in Texas for the 1994 murder of Denise Christie Brothers. The FBI has said 78-year-old Little is in poor health and will likely stay in a Texas prison until he dies.

While in prison, last year he began confessing and drawing the portraits of his victims over three decades from memory with the encouragement of investigators. After Little admitted to killing two women in Louisiana, investigators said they are re-examining their cold cases to see if there are any more victims.

“You definitely can’t rule him out,” Houma Police Chief Dana Coleman told FOX8 Tuesday. “He’s volunteering this information, and I know based on our two, he was extremely detailed in the information he released.”

This undated file photo provided by the Ector County Texas Sheriff's Office shows Samuel Little.

This undated file photo provided by the Ector County Texas Sheriff’s Office shows Samuel Little. (Ector County Texas Sheriff’s Office via AP)

Louisiana police have previously said Little provided details about the strangulation deaths of Dorothy Richard, 59, and Daisy McGuire, 40, in Houma that “only the murderer would have known.” Richard was found dead in 1982 and the body of McGuire was discovered in 1996.

FBI WANTS HELP IN IDENTIFYING VICTIMS FROM PORTRAITS DRAWN BY SERIAL KILLER

One of those details Coleman pointed out was “something only the killer would know” — that McGuire’s family said she would carry a Bible with her.

“That’s one thing in Samuel’s confession to the Texas Ranger that I knew he was talking about Daisy,” Coleman told FOX8. “He didn’t specifically say her name, but he said she was short, light-skinned, nice looking lady, but she always carried a Bible and I was like, ‘That’s Daisy.’”

Samuel Little, 78, has confessed to 90 killings. Authorities in Louisiana are looking into cold cases to see if he is connected to those killings.

Samuel Little, 78, has confessed to 90 killings. Authorities in Louisiana are looking into cold cases to see if he is connected to those killings. (AP)

Officials believe that Little also committed petty crimes in the area at the time to support himself and was in the area before McGuire’s killing. Investigators also learned that Little traveled along the Interstate 10 corridor frequently in his travels across the country and spent time in the Houma area before McGuire’s killing.

Along with crimes in Louisiana, Texas and California, Little may also have killed people between 1970 and 2005 in Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Illinois, Ohio, California, Indiana, Arizona, New Mexico and South Carolina, authorities said.

All of Little’s victims were strangled and their bodies dumped in mostly wooded areas. Because there were no gunshot or knife wounds on the victims, investigators blamed accidents, natural causes or drug overdoses for the deaths.

This combination of undated sketches provided by the FBI shows drawings made by admitted serial killer Samuel Little, based on his memories of some of his victims.

This combination of undated sketches provided by the FBI shows drawings made by admitted serial killer Samuel Little, based on his memories of some of his victims. (Courtesy of FBI via AP)

“He went on to kill an abundance of victims, that is scary,” Coleman told FOX8. “We have looked into some other cases around that time in 1996, also the latter part of the 70′s. There was another case that we brought when my detectives tried to interview him in October.”

MURDERED MEMPHIS MOTHER MAY BE SUBJECT IN SERIAL KILLER’S SKETCHES, FAMILY CLAIMS

The chief said that Little didn’t admit to another case in the parish, but it was very similar to the two other Louisiana killings.

“He didn’t admit to it, but he made a chilling statement, and the statement he made was ‘I don’t know how I missed her’” he said.

In February, the FBI began releasing portraits of unidentified women made by the prolific serial killer in the hopes of closing out some of the cold cases.

The drawings were based on the memories he has of some of his victims, whom the FBI said were “marginalized and vulnerable women who were often involved in prostitution and addicted to drugs.”

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Federal officials have said that investigators are working with state and local officials to match the confessions and evidence of women found across the country during Little’s killing spree, but Coleman admitted to FOX8 it will be “hard” to know how vast his rampage was.

“We may not ever know the extent,” he said. “I know, at some point, I understood it was 90 something victims, I believe it’s more. I do believe it’s more.”

Fox News’ Katherine Lam and Louis Casiano contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

A convicted serial killer who has confessed to 90 murders and was known for sketching portraits of his victims may be linked to even more unsolved killings in Louisiana, according to the police chief of a town where two of the slayings took place.

Samuel Little, who is already serving a life sentence for murdering three women in California, made the confessions last year while being held in Texas for the 1994 murder of Denise Christie Brothers. The FBI has said 78-year-old Little is in poor health and will likely stay in a Texas prison until he dies.

While in prison, last year he began confessing and drawing the portraits of his victims over three decades from memory with the encouragement of investigators. After Little admitted to killing two women in Louisiana, investigators said they are re-examining their cold cases to see if there are any more victims.

“You definitely can’t rule him out,” Houma Police Chief Dana Coleman told FOX8 Tuesday. “He’s volunteering this information, and I know based on our two, he was extremely detailed in the information he released.”

This undated file photo provided by the Ector County Texas Sheriff's Office shows Samuel Little.

This undated file photo provided by the Ector County Texas Sheriff’s Office shows Samuel Little. (Ector County Texas Sheriff’s Office via AP)

Louisiana police have previously said Little provided details about the strangulation deaths of Dorothy Richard, 59, and Daisy McGuire, 40, in Houma that “only the murderer would have known.” Richard was found dead in 1982 and the body of McGuire was discovered in 1996.

FBI WANTS HELP IN IDENTIFYING VICTIMS FROM PORTRAITS DRAWN BY SERIAL KILLER

One of those details Coleman pointed out was “something only the killer would know” — that McGuire’s family said she would carry a Bible with her.

“That’s one thing in Samuel’s confession to the Texas Ranger that I knew he was talking about Daisy,” Coleman told FOX8. “He didn’t specifically say her name, but he said she was short, light-skinned, nice looking lady, but she always carried a Bible and I was like, ‘That’s Daisy.’”

Samuel Little, 78, has confessed to 90 killings. Authorities in Louisiana are looking into cold cases to see if he is connected to those killings.

Samuel Little, 78, has confessed to 90 killings. Authorities in Louisiana are looking into cold cases to see if he is connected to those killings. (AP)

Officials believe that Little also committed petty crimes in the area at the time to support himself and was in the area before McGuire’s killing. Investigators also learned that Little traveled along the Interstate 10 corridor frequently in his travels across the country and spent time in the Houma area before McGuire’s killing.

Along with crimes in Louisiana, Texas and California, Little may also have killed people between 1970 and 2005 in Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Illinois, Ohio, California, Indiana, Arizona, New Mexico and South Carolina, authorities said.

All of Little’s victims were strangled and their bodies dumped in mostly wooded areas. Because there were no gunshot or knife wounds on the victims, investigators blamed accidents, natural causes or drug overdoses for the deaths.

This combination of undated sketches provided by the FBI shows drawings made by admitted serial killer Samuel Little, based on his memories of some of his victims.

This combination of undated sketches provided by the FBI shows drawings made by admitted serial killer Samuel Little, based on his memories of some of his victims. (Courtesy of FBI via AP)

“He went on to kill an abundance of victims, that is scary,” Coleman told FOX8. “We have looked into some other cases around that time in 1996, also the latter part of the 70′s. There was another case that we brought when my detectives tried to interview him in October.”

MURDERED MEMPHIS MOTHER MAY BE SUBJECT IN SERIAL KILLER’S SKETCHES, FAMILY CLAIMS

The chief said that Little didn’t admit to another case in the parish, but it was very similar to the two other Louisiana killings.

“He didn’t admit to it, but he made a chilling statement, and the statement he made was ‘I don’t know how I missed her’” he said.

In February, the FBI began releasing portraits of unidentified women made by the prolific serial killer in the hopes of closing out some of the cold cases.

The drawings were based on the memories he has of some of his victims, whom the FBI said were “marginalized and vulnerable women who were often involved in prostitution and addicted to drugs.”

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Federal officials have said that investigators are working with state and local officials to match the confessions and evidence of women found across the country during Little’s killing spree, but Coleman admitted to FOX8 it will be “hard” to know how vast his rampage was.

“We may not ever know the extent,” he said. “I know, at some point, I understood it was 90 something victims, I believe it’s more. I do believe it’s more.”

Fox News’ Katherine Lam and Louis Casiano contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

The identification in February of a 10-year-old boy whose body was found under a North Carolina interstate billboard 20 years ago has led to an indictment charging the child’s father with the cold-case murder.

The indictment returned in Orange County, N.C., also accuses John Whitt, 57, of concealing a death.

The boy, Bobby Whitt, was identified using DNA and genetic genealogy. His body was found off I-85 in Orange County in May 1998.

Police believe the boy and his mother, Myoung Hw Cho, were killed within months of each other in 1998.

MOTHER, SON FOUND DEAD ALONG INTERSTATE HIGHWAYS IN SOUTHEAST IDENTIFIED AFTER 20 YEARS

Myoung Hwa Cho and Robert Adam Whitt were killed months apart in 1998. Their bodies were found in two separate locations about 215 miles apart along Interstate 85.

Myoung Hwa Cho and Robert Adam Whitt were killed months apart in 1998. Their bodies were found in two separate locations about 215 miles apart along Interstate 85. (Spartanburg County Sheriff’s Office/Orange County Sheriff’s Office)

Her body was found off I-85 in South Carolina four months after Bobby’s body was found. She was identified after her son was identified.

“We believe both murders occurred in Concord (N.C.),” prosecutor Jim Woodall told WRAL-TV.

DNA, GENETIC GENEALOGY HELP SOLVE INDIANA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT’S COLD CASE MURDER

He told the station that because the Orange County Sheriff’s Office had investigated the case, “we thought this was the appropriate venue to bring the case against him for the death of his son.”

Woodall said he wasn’t sure when Whitt would be bought to North Carolina.

Whitt is serving time in a federal prison for armed robbery.

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Police said Whitt confessed to killing the boy and his wife.

Source: Fox News National

A man was arrested Thursday in the 33-year-old Hollywood cold case murder of director Barry Crane, according to police.

Crane, who worked on shows like “The Incredible Hulk,” “Hawaii Five-0,” “Dallas” and “The Six Million Dollar Man,” was found dead in the garage of his Studio City, Calif., home in July 1985. He had been bludgeoned with a ceramic statue and strangled with a phone cord. He was naked and wrapped in bedsheets. His car was also stolen.

COLD CASE KILLING OF WOMAN, 80, CRACKED AFTER 30 YEARS BY DNA TEST, ‘PERSEVERANCE’ BY DETECTIVES

Authorities said they were finally able to match a fingerprint found on Crane’s car to a man named Edwin Hiatt last year. FBI investigators then used cigarette butts and a coffee cup from the parking lot of an auto repair shop where Hiatt worked in North Carolina to match the DNA to cigarette butts found in Crane’s stolen car, which was recovered shortly after Crane’s murder.

Detectives then flew to North Carolina to speak to Hiatt. “During the interview, Hiatt admitted to killing Barry Crane,” a Los Angeles Police Department statement said.

Barry Crane worked on many shows like “The Incredible Hulk,” “Hawaii 5-0” and “Dallas.”

Barry Crane worked on many shows like “The Incredible Hulk,” “Hawaii 5-0” and “Dallas.” ((Getty Images))

In an interview, Hiatt told local station Charlotte’s WSOC-TV that he had no memory of Crane or the alleged incident, but that “anything” could have happened because he was “big into drugs.”

Co-workers at Hiatt’s auto shop said he isn’t a violent man.

“He wouldn’t hurt a flea,” co-worker Dee Hall told the News Herald of Morganton. “This is something that supposedly happened 30 years ago. The man’s changed. Christ has come in and he’s become a new creature. If God’s forgiven you, you’re forgiven. That’s it.”

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Investigators did not say anything about an alleged motive.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Source: Fox News National

More than three decades after 80-year-old Alice Haynesworth Ryan was found stabbed to death on her kitchen floor, authorities in South Carolina announced Monday a cutting-edge DNA test and dogged work by investigators led to an arrest in her cold case killing.

The Greenville Police Department said Brian Keith Munns, 51, has been charged with murder, burglary, armed robbery and possession of a weapon during a violent crime in connection with the nearly 31-year-old case.

“We know the time in between has been painful for the family, and we are elated to bring some closure for them and justice for Ms. Ryan,” Greenville Police Chief Ken Miller said at a news conference.

MARYLAND COPS ARREST MAN IN WIFE’S COLD CASE MURDER AFTER PROVING CRIME SCENE WAS STAGED: REPORT

Ryan had just come home from chemotherapy treatment as part of her battle with lung cancer on Oct. 8, 1988 when her daughter left to run an errand. When she returned less than two hours later, she discovered her mother’s car was missing, the front door was open and her mother’s dead body was on the kitchen floor.

Brian Keith Munns (left), has been arrested in the 1988 killing of 80-year-old Alice Haynesworth Ryan. Ryan was found stabbed to death at her home in South Carolina.

Brian Keith Munns (left), has been arrested in the 1988 killing of 80-year-old Alice Haynesworth Ryan. Ryan was found stabbed to death at her home in South Carolina. (Greenville Police Department)

Officials said Ryan’s stolen 1967 Ford Galaxie was found between her home and Munns, who lived 2 miles away, in addition to the items used to attack Ryan and stolen from her home.

The DNA that led authorities to Munn was discovered in the car and was finally able to be tested 30 years after her death — though police did not reveal additional details about the evidence.

“Fortunately these detectives have done an amazing job maintaining and preserving evidence,” prosecutor Walt Wilkins said.

Greenville police Chief Ken Miller, left, talks near Thirteenth Circuit Solicitor Walt Wilkins, right, about an arrest in the 1988 cold case homicide of Alice Haynesworth Ryan.

Greenville police Chief Ken Miller, left, talks near Thirteenth Circuit Solicitor Walt Wilkins, right, about an arrest in the 1988 cold case homicide of Alice Haynesworth Ryan. (Ken Ruinard/The Independent-Mail via AP)

In April 2017, Greenville police gave the murder case file to its expanded cold case unit. The DNA test came back with a match to Munns in November 2017 and detectives started a number of interviews including with Munns, according to Miller.

DNA, GENETIC GENEALOGY HELP SOLVE INDIANA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT’S COLD CASE MURDER

Munns, who is a registered sex offender in South Carolina after a 2001 rape conviction, was arrested in February on lesser charges in Georgia. Miller said he intentionally kept the arrest secret so detectives could do more interviews and get the best case they could. Investigators then conducted dozens of additional interviews, which led to the murder charge.

A Greenville police photo of arrested suspect Brian Keith Munns is displayed as police chief Ken Miller talks about an arrest in the 1988 cold case homicide of Alice Haynesworth Ryan.

A Greenville police photo of arrested suspect Brian Keith Munns is displayed as police chief Ken Miller talks about an arrest in the 1988 cold case homicide of Alice Haynesworth Ryan. (Ken Ruinard/The Independent-Mail via AP)

“An acquaintance of the suspect revealed detailed information the suspect described about the murder of Alice Ryan to include method of entry, injuries inflicted, area of the encounter, location of evidence and the timeline of events,” Miller said.

Wilkins said the state will be prosecuting based on the language of the law in 1988 but will not be seeking the death penalty, FOX Carolina reported.

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The chief did not say what may have led Munns to Ryan’s home that day or if he knew her or her family.

Family members who attended the news conference on Monday praised the work of police for finally solving the case, according to the Greenville News.

Joe Ryan, left, of Greenville stands with his wife near a photo of his late mother Alice Haynesworth Ryan, during a city police announcement of an arrest in the 1988 cold case homicide.

Joe Ryan, left, of Greenville stands with his wife near a photo of his late mother Alice Haynesworth Ryan, during a city police announcement of an arrest in the 1988 cold case homicide. (Ken Ruinard/The Independent-Mail via AP)

“This is all about perseverance and steadfastness,” Joe Ryan, the son of Alice Ryan, told reporters. “The people who have been working this thing have been unbelievable. They have gone all out and all out for a long period of time, and they don’t give up.”

The cold case squad in Greenville has made arrests in three old cases in the past year. The first two were cracked with DNA results from family genealogy sites.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National


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