fox-news/us/crime/police-and-law-enforcement

A Hawaii woman has been found alive in a forest on Maui island Friday after going missing more than two weeks ago.

Amanda Eller, 35, was found injured in the Makawao Forest Reserve, the Maui News reported Friday. News of her discovery was announced on the Findamanda Facebook page, Hawaii News Now reported.

A post on their Findamanda Facebook group accompanying this picture said: Amanda was found by our own search team captains Chris and Javier!! They were in a helicopter searching out of the general area where we have been in. She spotted them and they spotted her at the same time. She waved them down. She was deep in a creek bed between two waterfalls. She is just as strong as we always said she would be. We knew she could make it this long. Amanda is doing great she is just talked to her father from air evacuation helicopter. More soon!!

A post on their Findamanda Facebook group accompanying this picture said: Amanda was found by our own search team captains Chris and Javier!! They were in a helicopter searching out of the general area where we have been in. She spotted them and they spotted her at the same time. She waved them down. She was deep in a creek bed between two waterfalls. She is just as strong as we always said she would be. We knew she could make it this long. Amanda is doing great she is just talked to her father from air evacuation helicopter. More soon!! (Javier Cantellops)

“Amanda has been found,” the statement read. “She got lost and was stuck and slightly injured in the forest – way way out.”

FIRE OFFICIALS REPORTEDLY STOP SEARCHING FOR WOMAN, 35, WHO DISAPPEARED NEAR HAWAII FOREST

Javier Cantellops said he was searching for Eller from a helicopter along with Chris Berquist and Troy Helmers when they spotted her, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported.

Cantellops said she was in the bed of a creek with waterfalls on either side.

The physical therapist and yoga instructor from the Maui town of Haiku went missing on May 8. Her white Toyota RAV4 was discovered in the forest parking lot with her phone and wallet inside. Her boyfriend reported her missing on May 9, Hawaii News Now reported.

MISSING ALABAMA WOMAN FOUND ALIVE IN WRECKED CAR 5 DAYS AFTER DISAPPEARANCE, POLICE SAY

Since she went missing, hundreds of volunteers have searched for her.

It was not immediately clear how or to what extent Eller was injured, but Berquist said Eller was “very alert” and “very surprised to see us.”

“I’ve never felt something quite that overpowering,” he told ABC News Radio.

Eller’s mother, Julia, said she “elated” by the good news.

“I can’t even put it into words,” she said. “I’m so incredibly grateful.”

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Earlier Friday, the reward for finding the physical therapist was raised to $50,000.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

A former Chicago police officer — who risked her own safety to help nab a corrupt officer extorting money from the city’s poorest and planting drugs on those who refused to pay — will have her story featured Friday on the CBS series “Whistleblowers.”

Shannon Spalding says she’s had her tires slashed and was repeatedly threatened while she helped build the case against a corrupt team of officers run by former Sgt. Ronald Watts.

THREE ARRESTED IN MURDER OF CHICAGO WOMAN, 19, WHO WAS 9 MONTHS PREGNANT, COPS SAY

“Someone was trying to kill me,” Spalding said. “When I signed up for this job, I knew I might have to lay my life down, but I never thought I’d have to worry about it being a fellow officer doing that to me.”

Spalding, who joined the Chicago Police Department in 1996, said she spent time in some of the city’s most violent neighborhoods. To survive, she recalled leaning on veteran cops like Watts.

“I thought he was battling crime and he was doing it with finesse and grace,” she said.

But about a decade later, while on an undercover assignment in the narcotics division, she began to see Watts in a different light.

CHICAGO CITY LEADER ARRESTED FOR ALLEGEDLY FILING FALSE POLICE REPORT

Spalding said she began troubling rumors as she and her partner would make an arrest, with a suspect saying something along the lines of: “I can’t believe you’re going to arrest me when one of your own is actually running the narcotics side,” Spalding said.

After some digging, Spalding learned the charge was true: Watts and his group would threaten and plant drugs on residents of the Ida B. Wells projects who didn’t go along with their rules — and that type of intimidation had gone on for years.

Spalding was faced with a decision.

“If we don’t report this criminal conduct we’re absolutely no better than Watts or any of these other corrupt officers. And if we do, we may just be ending our careers and putting ourselves in real danger,” she said.

In the end, she and her partner went to the FBI.

“My greatest fear was that because this was such a long-running…criminal enterprise…I felt that we would be set up for dead,” she said.

Eventually, though, Watts and one of his officers, Kallat Mohammed, were arrested after they were caught stealing $5,200 from a drug courier — who also happened to be Spalding’s informant and was wearing a wire at the time.

Watts was sentenced to 22 months behind bars while Mohammed received an 18-month sentence.

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Since their arrest, 60 Chicagoans who were wrongfully arrested by Watts and his team have been exonerated.

Source: Fox News National

A former Chicago police officer — who risked her own safety to help nab a corrupt officer extorting money from the city’s poorest and planting drugs on those who refused to pay — will have her story featured Friday on the CBS series “Whistleblowers.”

Shannon Spalding says she’s had her tires slashed and was repeatedly threatened while she helped build the case against a corrupt team of officers run by former Sgt. Ronald Watts.

THREE ARRESTED IN MURDER OF CHICAGO WOMAN, 19, WHO WAS 9 MONTHS PREGNANT, COPS SAY

“Someone was trying to kill me,” Spalding said. “When I signed up for this job, I knew I might have to lay my life down, but I never thought I’d have to worry about it being a fellow officer doing that to me.”

Spalding, who joined the Chicago Police Department in 1996, said she spent time in some of the city’s most violent neighborhoods. To survive, she recalled leaning on veteran cops like Watts.

“I thought he was battling crime and he was doing it with finesse and grace,” she said.

But about a decade later, while on an undercover assignment in the narcotics division, she began to see Watts in a different light.

CHICAGO CITY LEADER ARRESTED FOR ALLEGEDLY FILING FALSE POLICE REPORT

Spalding said she began troubling rumors as she and her partner would make an arrest, with a suspect saying something along the lines of: “I can’t believe you’re going to arrest me when one of your own is actually running the narcotics side,” Spalding said.

After some digging, Spalding learned the charge was true: Watts and his group would threaten and plant drugs on residents of the Ida B. Wells projects who didn’t go along with their rules — and that type of intimidation had gone on for years.

Spalding was faced with a decision.

“If we don’t report this criminal conduct we’re absolutely no better than Watts or any of these other corrupt officers. And if we do, we may just be ending our careers and putting ourselves in real danger,” she said.

In the end, she and her partner went to the FBI.

“My greatest fear was that because this was such a long-running…criminal enterprise…I felt that we would be set up for dead,” she said.

Eventually, though, Watts and one of his officers, Kallat Mohammed, were arrested after they were caught stealing $5,200 from a drug courier — who also happened to be Spalding’s informant and was wearing a wire at the time.

Watts was sentenced to 22 months behind bars while Mohammed received an 18-month sentence.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Since their arrest, 60 Chicagoans who were wrongfully arrested by Watts and his team have been exonerated.

Source: Fox News National

A former Chicago police officer — who risked her own safety to help nab a corrupt officer extorting money from the city’s poorest and planting drugs on those who refused to pay — will have her story featured Friday on the CBS series “Whistleblowers.”

Shannon Spalding says she’s had her tires slashed and was repeatedly threatened while she helped build the case against a corrupt team of officers run by former Sgt. Ronald Watts.

THREE ARRESTED IN MURDER OF CHICAGO WOMAN, 19, WHO WAS 9 MONTHS PREGNANT, COPS SAY

“Someone was trying to kill me,” Spalding said. “When I signed up for this job, I knew I might have to lay my life down, but I never thought I’d have to worry about it being a fellow officer doing that to me.”

Spalding, who joined the Chicago Police Department in 1996, said she spent time in some of the city’s most violent neighborhoods. To survive, she recalled leaning on veteran cops like Watts.

“I thought he was battling crime and he was doing it with finesse and grace,” she said.

But about a decade later, while on an undercover assignment in the narcotics division, she began to see Watts in a different light.

CHICAGO CITY LEADER ARRESTED FOR ALLEGEDLY FILING FALSE POLICE REPORT

Spalding said she began troubling rumors as she and her partner would make an arrest, with a suspect saying something along the lines of: “I can’t believe you’re going to arrest me when one of your own is actually running the narcotics side,” Spalding said.

After some digging, Spalding learned the charge was true: Watts and his group would threaten and plant drugs on residents of the Ida B. Wells projects who didn’t go along with their rules — and that type of intimidation had gone on for years.

Spalding was faced with a decision.

“If we don’t report this criminal conduct we’re absolutely no better than Watts or any of these other corrupt officers. And if we do, we may just be ending our careers and putting ourselves in real danger,” she said.

In the end, she and her partner went to the FBI.

“My greatest fear was that because this was such a long-running…criminal enterprise…I felt that we would be set up for dead,” she said.

Eventually, though, Watts and one of his officers, Kallat Mohammed, were arrested after they were caught stealing $5,200 from a drug courier — who also happened to be Spalding’s informant and was wearing a wire at the time.

Watts was sentenced to 22 months behind bars while Mohammed received an 18-month sentence.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

Since their arrest, 60 Chicagoans who were wrongfully arrested by Watts and his team have been exonerated.

Source: Fox News National

A Philadelphia Police Department detective is on desk duty after he allegedly shot and wounded an unarmed man he thought was an armed robber Monday.

The victim, whom relatives identified as 28-year-old Joel Johnson, was a well-known panhandler, according to Philly.com. The news outlet reported that residents who live in the Kensington neighborhood, where the incident took place, said Johnson spent almost every day asking people for change.

PENNSYLVANIA MAN TOOK GIRL, 4, BOUND AND STUFFED HER IN TRUNK AT GRANDPARENT’S HOME, POLICE SAY

According to Philadelphia police, the 29-year-old plainclothes detective had wrapped up processing a crime scene and was driving back to the police station in an unmarked vehicle at around 8:45 p.m.

The detective was stopped in traffic when he spotted Johnson in the street “with his arms extended forward and his hands together,” according to the Philadelphia Police Department. The detective allegedly thought Johnson was pointing a gun at him while yelling. He thought Johnson was going to rob him so the detective fired four shots from inside his unmarked vehicle, striking Johnson once in the stomach, according to the department.

Police said Johnson then fell to the ground and was transported to Temple University Hospital by police in a marked patrol vehicle.

He underwent surgery, according to police, and was listed in critical, but stable condition. An updated condition was not immediately available but Philadelphia police told Fox News Johnson is expected to survive.

Police said they did not find a firearm at the scene or on Johnson.

No one else was injured during the incident.

SUSPECT IN PHILADELPHIA SOUGHT FOR OPENING FIRE ON CAR WAITING FOR AAA, POLICE SAY

Residents who live near the scene where Johnson was shot told Philly.com he would often extend his arms and rub his fingers together when asking for change.

Surveillance video published by Philly.com article appears to show the moment the detective fired shots after Johnson approached the front of the detective’s car. The video shows what looks like a plume of smoke coming from the driver’s side window, followed by Johnson falling to the ground.

Philly.com reported that a witness at the scene said he saw the detective get out of the car after the shots were fired and heard the detective yell, “‘Don’t move! Where is the gun?’”

That witness said he knows Johnson from the neighborhood and described him as “harmless.”

Jose Tirado, who identified himself as Johnson’s brother, asked for prayers in a Facebook post, adding that Johnson has “special needs.”

“Many people know him and know that he ask[s] people for change and he has special needs but to shoot him threw [through] a close[d] car window without asking a question is crazy,” Tirado wrote in the post. “I’m not condemning any officer for this but being a former officer for many years, I know what it is to have gun control. To shoot a[n] unarmed person who has no history of any violence and nothing in his hands at the time is hard for me to understand why deadly force was used.”

Tirado added that he was thanking God that only one bullet hit Johnson.

The detective has been with the Philadelphia Police Department since October 2011. His name has not been made public

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Philadelphia Police told Fox News the detective involved has been placed on desk duty as the investigation continues, which is standard procedure.

The shooting marked the fifth time this year that a Philadelphia officer fired shots while on duty, according to police data. Last year, the Philadelphia Police Department reported 12 incidents where police officers opened fire while on the job, the lowest number of officer-involved shootings in at least the last decade.

Source: Fox News National

A New York state man was recently caught taking the creative route when it came to getting his car inspected.

Instead of taking it to the Department of Motor Vehicles, the 35-year-old allegedly drew an imitation sticker by hand — and it didn’t convince authorities.

This fake inspection sticker didn't sit well with authorities in New York's Montgomery County.

This fake inspection sticker didn’t sit well with authorities in New York’s Montgomery County. (Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office)

The “inspection sticker” appears to be a red piece of construction paper with almost illegible handwriting implying the vehicle passed inspection until January 2020.

“So, we appreciate people who take some initiative, however this will not work as your vehicle inspection sticker, NICE TRY!!” the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office posted on Facebook Tuesday.

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The driver was identified as Manuel Muniz, of Amsterdam, a city roughly 35 miles northwest of Albany, according to WRGB. He faces a violation for driving an unregistered vehicle.

Source: Fox News National

President Trump awarded the Medal of Valor to 14 public safety officers on Wednesday; the medal is the nation’s highest honor for bravery by a public safety officer.

“Every officer, firefighter and first responder who receives this award embodies the highest ideals of service and sacrifice, character and courage,” Trump said during the White House ceremony.

Trump presented the award to a group of officers who responded to a shooting at a southern California polling place.

WOMAN WHO SMACKED RESTAURANT EMPLOYEE WITH TAKEOUT BAG WAS ‘UPSET’ WITH SANDWICH

Eight men from the Azusa, Calif., police department were honored for placing themselves in danger and saving the lives of civilians and fellow officers during the shooting on Election Day 2016.

When they arrived at the polling place, a person was shooting from a house across the street from a park. An elderly woman had been killed and a man lay wounded on a sidewalk. Two vehicles had collided and a woman in one of the cars was critically injured. The shooter was eventually killed and the officers were credited for preventing other deaths and injuries.

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The recipients from the Azusa, California police department were: Retired Lt. Xavier Torres; Sgt. Seth Chapman; retired Sgt. Terry Smith Jr.; Sgt. Thomas Avila III; Sgt. Rocky Wenrick; Cpl. Andrew Rodriguez Sr.; senior officer Carlos Plascencia; and detective Manuel Campos.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Frank Miles is a reporter and editor covering geopolitics, military, crime, technology and sports for FoxNews.com. His email is Frank.Miles@foxnews.com.

Source: Fox News Politics

A New Jersey police officer could spend the rest of his life behind bars after being charged with shooting and killing a driver and wounding a passenger during a wild chase that was all caught on video.

Jovanny Crespo of the Newark Police Department was indicted by a grand jury Tuesday on six counts related to the late January death of Gregory Griffin, the Essex County Prosecutor’s Office said. The announcement coincided with the release of a dramatic bodycam video of the fatal police pursuit, showing the 26-year-old officer firing off numerous rounds into the car Griffin was driving.

“It is the state’s position that this officer’s conduct that night was criminal,” acting Essex County Prosecutor Theodore Stephens said. “He showed a reckless disregard for human life by shooting into a moving vehicle, a vehicle which had heavily tinted windows. This is the first fatal police-involved shooting to result in an indictment in Essex County in recent memory.”

VIDEO SHOWS DEADLY CONNECTICUT POLICE SHOOTING AFTER OFFICER YELLS ‘SHOW ME YOUR HANDS’

Investigators say the Jan. 28 incident began after a female Newark police officer pulled over Griffin’s car in a traffic stop. They say he sped off and the officer “radioed… that she saw a gun,” which “led to a pursuit involving a number of police cars.”

Crespo’s bodycam footage starts with him riding in the passenger seat of a police cruiser, repeatedly demanding the driver to “cut in front” of Griffin’s black car.

Crespo then hops out as Griffin pulls into an intersection, firing off several rounds at the vehicle while saying “get out of the car”. But Griffin takes off again and Crespo re-enters the police cruiser, and is heard breathing heavily as his driver revs the engine in pursuit.

“I shot at him, bro,” Crespo says to the driver. He then resumes giving instructions to the driver, who tells him to “relax”. At one point, the now-agitated driver yells at Crespo to stay inside the car as he tries to open his passenger door and engage Griffin a second time.

Newark Police Officer Jovanny Crespo could be sentenced to life in prison for his alleged role in a police-involved shooting in January, prosecutors say.

Newark Police Officer Jovanny Crespo could be sentenced to life in prison for his alleged role in a police-involved shooting in January, prosecutors say. (Essex County Prosecutor’s Office)

Yet at another intersection, Crespo appears to ignore the driver’s command. The footage shows him jumping out of the car and firing off more rounds at Griffin’s vehicle, which once again speeds off.

“Bro, he pointed the gun right at me,” Crespo tells the driver after getting back inside his police car.

TEXAS POLICE OFFICER SEEN SHOOTING MAN WHO WAS STABBING WOMAN TO DEATH

The chase ends with Crespo leaving his police cruiser a third time to approach Griffin, now stopped in the middle of a street.

“Stop the car!” Crespo is heard saying as Griffin’s vehicle – with its passenger door slightly open – begins moving again. Crespo fires off multiple rounds at the car and other officers swarm it, pulling out 35-year-old passenger Andrew Dixon, who sustained serious injuries. Griffin, behind the wheel, remained motionless.

The Essex County Prosecutor’s Office says both men were shot in the head during the pursuit and Griffin, 46, died at a hospital the following day. No officers were injured during the incident and Crespo was the only one to discharge his weapon, they added.

In the bodycam footage, Crespo is heard telling his colleagues “I shot him in the head” and “I shot both of them.”

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The New Jersey Attorney General’s use of force policy states that officers are only allowed to use deadly force to prevent the escape of a fleeing suspect if it is determined that the suspect “will pose an imminent danger of death of serious bodily harm should the escape succeed.” The policy also says officers can only use deadly force in those conditions if it “presents no substantial risk of injury to innocent persons.”

Crespo was taken into custody Tuesday being charged with aggravated manslaughter, aggravated assault, two counts of Possession of Weapon for an Unlawful Purpose and two counts of Official Misconduct – and faces life in prison if convicted on all counts. He has been suspended without pay and is expected to make his first court appearance Wednesday or Thursday.

Source: Fox News National

A Texas deputy who was trying to be a Good Samaritan wound up a victim after a train hit his car, according to officials.

WISCONSIN FIREFIGHTER DIES AFTER BEING SHOT RESPONDING TO MEDICAL CALL, OFFICIALS SAY

The Midland County deputy had tried to cross the railroad tracks responding to a call of a baby in distress, but was hit by a train on a track, Fox 7 Austin reported.

Video showed how the vehicle was flipped from the force of impact.

The deputy was rushed to a local hospital with minor injuries, including bruising throughout his body, officials said.

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The baby was found and taken to the hospital, as well.

Midland County is about 130 miles south of Lubbock.

Click for more from Fox 7 Austin.

Frank Miles is a reporter and editor covering geopolitics, military, crime, technology and sports for FoxNews.com. His email is Frank.Miles@foxnews.com.

Source: Fox News National

A Texas deputy who was trying to be a Good Samaritan wound up a victim after a train hit his car, according to officials.

WISCONSIN FIREFIGHTER DIES AFTER BEING SHOT RESPONDING TO MEDICAL CALL, OFFICIALS SAY

The Midland County deputy had tried to cross the railroad tracks responding to a call of a baby in distress, but was hit by a train on a track, Fox 7 Austin reported.

Video showed how the vehicle was flipped from the force of impact.

The deputy was rushed to a local hospital with minor injuries, including bruising throughout his body, officials said.

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The baby was found and taken to the hospital, as well.

Midland County is about 130 miles south of Lubbock.

Click for more from Fox 7 Austin.

Frank Miles is a reporter and editor covering geopolitics, military, crime, technology and sports for FoxNews.com. His email is Frank.Miles@foxnews.com.

Source: Fox News National


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