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A fraternity at Hofstra University in New York has been suspended after a video — which appears to show students forcing a dog to drink from a beer keg — circulated online.

The roughly 5-second video purportedly shows a member of the Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity picking up a small brown dog, while another member pours beer into its mouth, which is commonly referred to as a “keg stand.”

The dog appears to flail slightly before seemingly panicking, shooting its tail up and its legs back. It was not immediately clear when the video was taken, but the Twitter user who first posted the video put it online Saturday.

Hofstra University told Fox News on Tuesday the fraternity was placed on interim suspension while the school investigates the incident, which reportedly took place off-campus from the Long Island school.

“The behavior seen on the video is unacceptable and in violation of the University’s Code of Community Standards,” the statement read. “In accordance with University policy, the chapter has been placed on interim suspension pending an investigation.”

PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE TO NO LONGER ALLOW FRATS, SORORITIES

The school added that any students identified in the video “will also be subject to the University’s Code of Community Standards.”

The Nassau County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals confirmed it’s investigating the alleged encounter, which they were notified about on Sunday.

Gary Rogers, president of the SPCA board, said that, on Monday, investigators visited the fraternity house and determined the dog was in good health, as the dog’s safety is their “main concern.” The dog’s owner surrendered the dog to the organization, according to Rogers.

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Alpha Epsilon Pi International tweeted the Hofstra chapter has been placed on “‘cease and desist’ due to suspected violations of our health and safety policies. We hope this can be a teaching moment to help build better young men who are committed to our mission and values.”

“It’s wrong what they did, on every level,” Rogers told Fox News. “Society is judged on how it treats its animals. This fraternity really didn’t do the right thing.”

Source: Fox News National

Harvard Law professor emeritus Alan Dershowitz called the school’s decision to drop Ronald Sullivan Jr. from his role as dean of a residential house after he joined Harvey Weinstein’s legal defense team “the new McCarthyism.”

Dershowitz reacted in a series of tweets Sunday, “The new McCarthyism comes to Harvard. The firing of Dean Sullivan reminds me of the bad old days when lawyers were fired for representing communists, gay people, civil rights demonstrators and women seeking abortions.”

Sullivan, a Harvard Law professor, signed on to become one of Weinstein’s lawyers in January, which sparked outrage from many students at Winthrop House – the Harvard residential college where Sullivan has worked since 2009. He has lived and supervised students at the house.

HARVARD WON’T RENEW WEINSTEIN LAWYER AS STUDENT HOUSE DEAN

In a written statement Saturday, Harvard College Dean Rakesh Khurana said he would not renew the appointments of Ronald Sullivan and his wife, Stephanie Robinson, a law school lecturer, when their term ends on June 30, citing “numerous” concerns about the climate at Winthrop House, which he described as “serious.”

The couple became the first black faculty deans in Harvard history when they took their positions at Winthrop ten years ago.

Some students and faculty members have criticized Sullivan’s decision to represent Weinstein and his response to students’ concerns.

In February, more than 50 students protested, demanding that Sullivan resign or be removed as dean of Winthrop House, according to the university’s newspaper.

The next month, graffiti calling for Sullivan’s resignation appeared on a Harvard building.

HARVEY WEINSTEIN SEXUAL ASSAULT CASE WILL MOVE FORWARD, JUDGE SAYS

Khurana called the situation regrettable and said efforts to improve the climate were ineffective.

A few minutes after his initial tweet, Dershowitz wrote, “This may be the worst violation of academic freedom during my 55 year association with Harvard. Any student who feels ‘unsafe’ in the presence of Dean Sullivan and his wife does not belong at a university.”

He added, “’Feeling unsafe’ is the new mantra of the new McCarthyism. It’s an excuse for firing anyone, from a Republican to a Muslim,” invoking Sen. Joseph McCarthy, the Wisconsin Republican linked to the post-World War II “Red Scare.” McCarthy served in the Senate from 1947 until his death in 1957.

Alan Dershowitz, seen here, slammed Harvard's decision to drop a dean representing Harvey Weinstein.

Alan Dershowitz, seen here, slammed Harvard’s decision to drop a dean representing Harvey Weinstein. (Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images, File)

Later, he tweeted, “If the students who demanded the firing of Sullivan had been around in 1776, John Adams would have been fired as an author of the Declaration because he made them feel unsafe for representing the Brits accused of the Boston Massacre. Shame on these student McCarthyites.”

Harvard did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment on Dershowitz’s reaction.

Sullivan and Robinson said in an email that they were “surprised” and “dismayed” by the Ivy League school’s decision not to renew their appointments as residential deans. They said Harvard unilaterally ended discussions that they believed had been progressing.

Robinson and Sullivan were "dismayed" by Harvard's move.

Robinson and Sullivan were “dismayed” by Harvard’s move. (Youtube/BlackPrelaw, The Associated Press, File)

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Weinstein is charged with raping an unidentified female acquaintance in his hotel room in 2013 and performing a forcible sex act on a different woman in 2006.

Weinstein has denied all allegations of nonconsensual sex. He pleaded not guilty and was freed on $1 million bail. His trial is scheduled to begin June 3.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Source: Fox News National

An Ohio high school announced Thursday that they will be eliminating valedictorian and salutatorian honors starting next year in an effort to improve students’ mental wellness.

Officials with Mason High School, located in a Cincinnati suburb, said they were removing the honors and will instead recognize “students who have achieved outstanding academic success through a multitude of pathways,” Principal Bobby Dodd said in a statement, according to FOX 19 NOW.

OHIO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ ‘PROMPOSAL’ SIGN DEEMED RACIST BY OFFICIALS, IGNITES BACKLASH

Dodd said the move would help curb the competitive culture at the school and permit students to focus on other things. The school would continue to recognize those with a high average. Students who have achieved a 4.0 GPA or higher will earn summa cum laude. Students with a 3.75 to 3.99 GPA will receive magna cum laude honors. Those with a 3.51 to 3.74 will earn designated cum laude. The school originally recognized one valedictorian and salutatorian based on a students’ GPA ranking.

OHIO BURGLARY SUSPECT PET THE DOG, WASHED THE DISHES, DEPUTIES SAY

“The paradoxical nature of class rank within the culture of MHS does nothing to decrease the competition among students,” Dodd said.

The school said it would also start a half hour later starting next year and are working on giving students less work during the summer. The district stated the changes came following a year-long study and group meetings where staff, families and students attended.

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Former student Samantha Segerman told WCPO she remembered having a “few mental breakdowns” in fear of dropping rankings.

“I know there were kids well over a 4.0 who were barely in the top 10 percent,” Segerman told WCPO.

Source: Fox News National

An Ohio high school announced Thursday that they will be eliminating valedictorian and salutatorian honors starting next year in an effort to improve students’ mental wellness.

Officials with Mason High School, located in a Cincinnati suburb, said they were removing the honors and will instead recognize “students who have achieved outstanding academic success through a multitude of pathways,” Principal Bobby Dodd said in a statement, according to FOX 19 NOW.

OHIO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ ‘PROMPOSAL’ SIGN DEEMED RACIST BY OFFICIALS, IGNITES BACKLASH

Dodd said the move would help curb the competitive culture at the school and permit students to focus on other things. The school would continue to recognize those with a high average. Students who have achieved a 4.0 GPA or higher will earn summa cum laude. Students with a 3.75 to 3.99 GPA will receive magna cum laude honors. Those with a 3.51 to 3.74 will earn designated cum laude. The school originally recognized one valedictorian and salutatorian based on a students’ GPA ranking.

OHIO BURGLARY SUSPECT PET THE DOG, WASHED THE DISHES, DEPUTIES SAY

“The paradoxical nature of class rank within the culture of MHS does nothing to decrease the competition among students,” Dodd said.

The school said it would also start a half hour later starting next year and are working on giving students less work during the summer. The district stated the changes came following a year-long study and group meetings where staff, families and students attended.

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Former student Samantha Segerman told WCPO she remembered having a “few mental breakdowns” in fear of dropping rankings.

“I know there were kids well over a 4.0 who were barely in the top 10 percent,” Segerman told WCPO.

Source: Fox News National

A San Francisco elementary school teacher has received an outpouring of support and donations from parents after it was revealed she’d been forced to pay a substitute’s salary as she battled cancer — all due to a decades-old law.

The educator, who has asked not to be named, teaches at Glen Park Elementary School. In the San Francisco Unified District, educators receive 10 sick days a year and 100 days of extended sick leave.

However, if a teacher uses up their sick days and is on extended time, then the district charges them for the substitute. NBC Bay Area reported, citing a San Francisco Unified School District spokesperson, that $195 is taken out of an educator’s salary daily to compensate the substitute. The law that required a sick educator to pay a substitute passed in the 1970s in California. Eric Heins of the California Teachers Association told The Washington Post that educators in the state “do not pay into the state’s disability program.” Each school district has different rules for extended medical leave.

CALIFORNIA OKS NEW SEX-ED GUIDELINES FOR TEACHERS DESPITE OBJECTIONS FROM PARENTS, PROTESTERS

Following news of the teacher paying the substitute, parents of students who attend the school raised more than $13,000 to help cover the sick teacher’s costs, NBC Bay Area reported.

“Our school is pulling together to help her and to make her feel that she’s not alone,” Narciso Flores-Diaz, a parent, told NBC Bay Area.

State Sen. Connie Leyva said she would review the law.

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“Candidly, I think that times have changed and it’s our job to change with the times,” she said.

The teacher said she was “truly grateful for this gift.”

“My heart is lifted and it gives me so much strength to know that so many people care about me and my family,” she said, according to The Washington Post.

Source: Fox News National

A California educator is battling a state teachers’ union over his problems leaving the organization, in what his attorneys say could be a precedent-setting legal case that ultimately forces labor unions across the country to reimburse billions in back dues to their members.

Tommy Few, a special education teacher at Sepulveda Middle School in Los Angeles’ San Fernando Valley, filed suit late last year against the United Teachers of Los Angeles – along with the Los Angeles Unified School District and California Attorney General Xavier Becerra – claiming his First Amendment rights to freedom of speech and association were violated when he tried to leave the UTLA following last summer’s Supreme Court ruling in Janus v. AFSCME.

CALIFORNIA WORKERS SUE UNION FOR HOLDING THEM ‘AGAINST THEIR WILL’ 

That ruling invalidated mandatory fees for non-members. But as a result, some unions members like Few also found themselves having second thoughts about staying on board once they learned they could save some money — only to run into problems renouncing their membership.

“When I found out that I didn’t have to be in the union and have those dues deducted from my paycheck every month, I wanted out,” Few told Fox News. “But they tried to tell me that I could only leave during their opt-out window and that I still had to pay the dues.”

Few said that despite the Supreme Court’s ruling in the Janus case – a 5-4 decision last June that said public employees can’t be forced to contribute to labor unions that represent them in collective bargaining – he faced an uphill battle trying to resign his membership from UTLA and get the school district to stop withholding dues from his paycheck.

At first, they didn’t respond to his requests. Then, when he pursued litigation, the union agreed to tell the school district to stop collecting dues from him and reimbursed him for all the dues paid post-Janus.

But Few is now seeking reimbursement for dues paid since he became a teacher.

At the heart of UTLA’s argument for continuing to deduct part of Few’s wages is a clause in the California Teachers Association’s membership enrollment form, which Few signed when he took the job and joined the union, that “the agreement to pay dues continues from year to year, regardless of my membership status” — unless the member sends a written notice opting out “not less than thirty (30) days and not more than sixty (60) days before the annual anniversary date of this agreement.”

UTLA, an affiliate of the CTA, did not respond to multiple calls from Fox News for comment, but in a letter sent to Few just weeks after the teacher’s lawyers at the Liberty Justice Center and the California Policy Center filed suit, union Executive Director Jeff Good referenced the enrollment form Few signed and noted that the affirmative consent form “is separately enforceable and effective apart from your membership.”

Good added that “rather than expend dues money on litigation” and because prior conversations had “inadvertently generated confusion,” UTLA requested the school district stop taking dues out of Few’s paychecks and reimbursed him $433.31 for the dues deducted since Few sought to leave the union.

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra’s office did not respond to Fox News’ request for comment, while the LAUSD said in a statement that the district’s superintendent was only added to the suit for “technical reasons so that in the event [Few] prevails on his claims against UTLA, the Court could adjust any deductions that have been or would be withheld by Los Angeles Unified and provided to UTLA.”

NEW YORK, CALIFORNIA SUE TRUMP ADMIN IN 9TH CIRCUIT OVER NATIONAL EMERGENCY DECLARATION

Despite the gesture by UTLA, Few and his legal team continue to pursue the lawsuit – which besides arguing that Few’s First Amendment rights were violated also seeks back dues to the date when he was hired – as they see his case as one that could ultimately end up in the Supreme Court and affect the future of labor union membership, and their bottom line, for decades to come.

Tommy Few after receiving his letter from UTLA and his refund check.

Tommy Few after receiving his letter from UTLA and his refund check.

“We’re hoping the court will see the obstacles unions can put in place and we workers to be able to express their intent to leave the union and be able to leave,” Mark Bucher, the chief executive officer of the California Policy Center and one of Few’s lawyers, told Fox News. “It should be crystal clear that a worker can get out of the union at any time they want and that unions can’t put restrictions and limitations on when someone can leave.”

Few’s case, which is currently being argued in federal court in the Central District of California, is among a slew of lawsuits that have been filed since the Janus ruling last summer arguing that unions have not fully complied with Janus and/or seeking refunds for workers. California teachers alone represent a huge chunk of those lawsuits.

SWEEPING CLASS-ACTION LAWSUIT COULD FORCE UNIONS NATIONWIDE TO REFUND MILLIONS IN FEES

In January, another Los Angeles-area teacher, Irene Seager, filed a lawsuit similar to Few’s seeking a refund for her back dues and challenging UTLA’s authority to limit dues opt-outs for employees to an annual window of just 30 days.

Six teachers in Northern California’s Freemont Unified School District filed suit in March against the CTA and Becerra amid claims that they were never informed that they were no longer required to have $1,500 in annual union dues deducted from their pay.

In a court filing, lawyers representing the teachers argued that the unions “regularly divert a portion of wages to financially support the unions and their political activity,” and that the teachers “never gave legally valid consent for these deductions and have expressly objected to the deductions.”

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And last week, a class-action lawsuit filed on the behalf of nine government worker plaintiffs and a class of more than 2,700 workers seeks to force unions to refund hundreds of millions of dollars in agency fees paid by thousands of workers nationwide prior to the Janus ruling.

“We’re putting the band back together,” Liberty Justice Center President Patrick Hughes told Fox News. “The argument is once something is deemed to be unconstitutional [in the civil context] — agency fees — then they’re deemed to be retroactively unconstitutional. … We’re taking the position that those fees should be refunded to those nonmembers.”

While union membership has been on the decline for decades, their power has remained strong in the public sector. Of the 16 percent of U.S. employees working in the public sector, more than one-third are still unionized – compared with just over 6 percent in the private sector, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Following the Janus ruling, union leaders argued that so-called fair share fees pay for collective bargaining and other work the union does on behalf of all employees, not just its members. More than half the states already have right-to-work laws banning mandatory fees, but most members of public-employee unions are concentrated in states that don’t, including California, New York and Illinois.

At the time of the Janus ruling, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka said in a statement that the decision would “further empower the corporate elites in their efforts to thwart the aspirations of millions of working people standing together for a better life.”

Fox News’ Gregg Re and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Two Tennessee sixth graders were charged with conspiracy to commit murder after investigators discovered a hand-drawn map and plans to shoot faculty and students, authorities said.

Cumberland County school and law enforcement officials said in a news release Monday that the two students planned to bring weapons and hide them in the locker room until the last day of school. Investigators discovered a hand-drawn map.

The press release stated investigators discovered no weapons in searches of both students’ homes. Officials began investigating after a South Cumberland Elementary school resource officer heard a rumor of a possible “hit list.”

TWO MORE BODIES FOUND IN TENNESSEE HOME, SUSPECT LINKED TO 7 DEATHS

“Our first and most important responsibility is to ensure the safety of our students and staff,” Janet Graham, the school’s director, said in a news release. “It was determined that at no time during the investigation students or staff were believed to be in any immediate danger.”

The two students, whose names were not made public because they are juveniles, were arrested Friday and held in Cumberland County Juvenile Detention Facility as they await a juvenile court hearing.

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“We take any threat to students and school faculty very seriously and we will respond, investigate and take swift appropriate action to manage each threat,” Casey Cox, the Cumberland County sheriff, said in a statement.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

Twenty students have committed suicide in India this past week after the Board of Intermediate Education (BIE) announced their exam scores, which Khaleejtimes reported have been marked in controversy after there were discrepancies in the results.

Nearly 1 million students took the exams between February and March, and nearly 350,000 failed, causing widespread protests from parents, student groups and political parties.

One student named Sirisha was failing biology and set herself on fire at her home in the Narayanpet district on Saturday after her parents went out to the fields, according to Khaleejtimes.

INDIAN VOTER CHOPS OFF FINGER AFTER ACCIDENTALLY VOTING FOR WRONG PARTY

On Thursday, Chief Minister K. Chandrashekhar Rao ordered the recounting and re-verification for all the students who failed their exams, while urging the students to not commit suicide, adding that failing the tests didn’t mean the end of their lives.

According to the parents, what caused students to commit suicide was an error on the part of the software solutions firm, Globarena Technologies Private Limited, which had been hired by Telagana BIE to develop software for processing admissions, pre-examination and post-examination results.

A three-member panel consisting of G.T. Venkateswar Rao, Managing Director, Telangana State Technological Service, A. Vassan of BITS Hyderabad and Nishanth Dongari of IIT Hyderabad, submitted its report on Thursday to B. Janardhan Reddy, Secretary, Higher Education, Government of Telangana, which looked into Globarena Technologies. They also made recommendations to avoid examination lapses in the future, according to Khaleejtimes

12 BIE centers are currently in the process of evaluating the answer sheets of the failed students, says Khaleetimes, with each one handling between 70,000 to 120,000.

Reddy told Khaleejtimes they are still receiving applications and more than 50,000 students who passed also applied for re-verification because they weren’t satisfied with their results.

The BIE says they have manpower to handle all the new tests, and they would release a daily bulletin on the status of those needing re-verification.

Answers were still wanted by the students and parents, who protested about the lack of information on the re-verification process. They wanted free re-verification for all of the students. According to Khaleejtimes they were denied entry to BIE offices by the local police.

YOUNG GIRL KEEPS HERSELF AND BROTHER ALIVE FOLLOWING PARENTS MURDER-SUICIDE, POLICE SAY

“Why should we pay fee for the blunders committed by them?” a student told Khaleejtimes.

The student groups also asked for 25 lakh ($36,000) as compensation for the families of each student who committed suicide.

In 2017, both the Andhra Pradesh and Telangana regions of India saw more than 50 suicides by students between September and October.

On Friday, the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) issued a notice to the Telangana government, seeking a detailed report by the Board.

Source: Fox News World

California State University’s campus in Long Beach is ditching its longtime mascot amid accusations of racism and officially moving to pick either a new symbol or have no mascot at all.

The university ditched its “Prospector Pete” character in September after criticism that it was offensive to indigenous people.

EMAILS: CAL STATE ACTIVISTS TARGET CONSERVATIVE STUDENT GROUP, SAY THEY’RE ‘NOT WELCOME’

This Sept. 20, 2017 photo shows the "Prospector Pete" statue at California State University, Long Beach, Calif.

This Sept. 20, 2017 photo shows the “Prospector Pete” statue at California State University, Long Beach, Calif. (Thomas R. Cordova/The Orange County Register via AP)

The supposedly offensive mascot was born when the campus opened in the 1940s, with founding President Pete Peterson’s comment that he “struck the gold of education” by creating it, according to the Los Angeles Times.

But students have come to see the mascot not as a tribute to their founder or to California history, but rather as a representation of the violence caused to Native Americans and others during California’s Gold Rush era.

Last year, the university moved the statue of the mascot away from a prominent place on campus due to the outcry.

A statement on the university website said the Gold Rush was “a time in history when the indigenous peoples of California endured subjugation, violence and threats of genocide.” (Whether the NFL’s San Francisco 49ers should be worried about their nickname is unknown at this point.)

CALIFORNIA COLLEGE MOVES ‘PROSPECTOR PETE’ STATUE FROM PLAZA

The university is now asking students to vote on a new mascot, with choices including Pelicans, Sharks, Stingrays, Giraffes, Kraken (a sea monster from Scandanavian folklore), or even picking the option called “the Beach” that is sort of a no-mascot option.

Genesis Jara, president of Associated Students, Inc., told the Mercury News of San Jose that the options for students to vote on were selected from hundreds of ideas submitted by students.

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The final decision will rest with President Jane Close Conoley.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

University of Maryland’s student government defeated an anti-Israel Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) bill after receiving backlash for voting on it while many Jewish students were observing Passover.

On Wednesday, the Student Government Association (SGA), which defended the timing of the vote, killed the bill, “A Resolution Urging the UMCP Administration to Divest from Companies Engaged in Human Rights Violations in Palestine,” sponsored by Divest UMD, a group that calls on the university to cut ties with companies that do business with Israel, with a vote of 25-9, with two students abstaining.

NJ MAYOR SLAMMED FOR REPLYING TO ANTI-SEMITIC TWEET SAYS HE WAS ‘MISINTERPRETED’

ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt called the timing of the vote “insensitive and entirely dishonest to the democratic process.”

In the several-hours-long meeting, Jonathan Allen, UMD student body president, told Fox News 74 students spoke in opposition to the BDS bill, while 55 voiced their support before the bill failed.

RABBI BLASTS ILHAN OMAR, NYT FOR PUSHING CLAIM JESUS WAS ‘PALESTINIAN,’ NOT JEWISH

Allen told The Diamondback, UMD’s student newspaper, that despite his anti-BDS stance, he valued the chance to hear the opinions of all students.

“I think it’s important for legislators to hear the comments and concerns of their constituents so that they so that they can responsibility vote on a very difficult and divisive issue,” the senior government and politics major said.

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The American Jewish Committee celebrated the outcome for “overwhelmingly rejecting a bigoted anti-Israel divestment bill…”

Source: Fox News National


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