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The remains of a Montana man killed during World War II while working to evacuate soldiers from an island east of the Philippines are due to be buried Saturday with full military honors.

A memorial service for Army Pvt. William Boegli was planned followed by interment at Sunset Hills Cemetery.

Boegli died in 1944, at age 25, while evacuating soldiers on Angaur Island.

His remains were buried on the island and later moved to Fort McKinley in Manila, Philippines.

But the remains weren’t identified until last year, after they were disinterred and their DNA compared to Boegli’s relatives.

Source: Fox News National

As a team of U.S. navy seals prepared to take down the mastermind behind the Sept. 11 attacks, Admiral William McRaven had some frank words for his troops.

While recalling that raid during an interview on “Fox & Friends,” McRaven said he treated the raid like “any other mission.” “What I told the guys was, ‘look, it is going to be easy to get overcome by the moment but just do your job.'”

US OFFERS $1M FOR INFORMATION LEADING TO USAMA BIN LADEN’S SON

He told Pete Hegseth that the raid felt different given that if former Al Qaeda leader Usama Bin Laden was in that Pakistani compound, his troops would be taking part in a “historic moment in terms of bringing justice to all those people that were killed in 9/11.”

When Hegseth asked what kept the admiral going, he said the young men and women of the military.

‘AMERICAN TALIBAN’ JOHN WALKER LINDH WILL ‘GET BACK INTO JIHAD’ AFTER HIS RELEASE, ROB O’NEILL SAYS

“If you spend time around the young men and women of the military, you can’t help but be inspired by their courage, their heroism, their sacrifice … all you got to do is spend a little time with them and you’ll get the energy to do the job.”

McRaven was promoting his book, “Sea Stories,” which recounted details from his life of service. He received attention for his book “Make Your Bed: Little Things That Can Change Your Life…And Maybe the World.”

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After Hegseth asked about raising good kids, McRaven praised milennials as the “next greatest generation.”

“I’m probably the biggest fan of the milennials you’ll ever meet and I think that surprises people,” he said. “I hear this that the milennials are pampered and they’re soft and they’re entitled. I’m quick to tell people, ‘then you never saw them in a firefight in Afghanistan’ or ‘you never saw them in a classroom in the University of Texas system trying to improve their life and the lives of their families.”

Source: Fox News Politics

As a team of U.S. navy seals prepared to take down the mastermind behind the Sept. 11 attacks, Admiral William McRaven had some frank words for his troops.

While recalling that raid during an interview on “Fox & Friends,” McRaven said he treated the raid like “any other mission.” “What I told the guys was, ‘look, it is going to be easy to get overcome by the moment but just do your job.'”

US OFFERS $1M FOR INFORMATION LEADING TO USAMA BIN LADEN’S SON

He told Pete Hegseth that the raid felt different given that if former Al Qaeda leader Usama Bin Laden was in that Pakistani compound, his troops would be taking part in a “historic moment in terms of bringing justice to all those people that were killed in 9/11.”

When Hegseth asked what kept the admiral going, he said the young men and women of the military.

‘AMERICAN TALIBAN’ JOHN WALKER LINDH WILL ‘GET BACK INTO JIHAD’ AFTER HIS RELEASE, ROB O’NEILL SAYS

“If you spend time around the young men and women of the military, you can’t help but be inspired by their courage, their heroism, their sacrifice … all you got to do is spend a little time with them and you’ll get the energy to do the job.”

McRaven was promoting his book, “Sea Stories,” which recounted details from his life of service. He received attention for his book “Make Your Bed: Little Things That Can Change Your Life…And Maybe the World.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

After Hegseth asked about raising good kids, McRaven praised milennials as the “next greatest generation.”

“I’m probably the biggest fan of the milennials you’ll ever meet and I think that surprises people,” he said. “I hear this that the milennials are pampered and they’re soft and they’re entitled. I’m quick to tell people, ‘then you never saw them in a firefight in Afghanistan’ or ‘you never saw them in a classroom in the University of Texas system trying to improve their life and the lives of their families.”

Source: Fox News Politics

An “Old Guard” soldier who was photographed placing a small American flag at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier during a severe thunderstorm is drawing notice ahead of Memorial Day.

The storm hit Thursday in D.C. as members of the 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment, better known as “The Old Guard,” were planting flags at each grave at the cemetery as they do each year at this time.

“During the storm, one of the most extraordinary displays of discipline and dedication to duty ever to be witnessed at Arlington National Cemetery was taking place at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier,” the Old Guard’s Facebook page said in a post.

A severe thunderstorm Thursday failed to stop a sentinel from placing a flag at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

A severe thunderstorm Thursday failed to stop a sentinel from placing a flag at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. (3d U.S. Infantry Regiment)

SEN. COTTON TELLS STORY OF SERVING WITH ‘THE OLD GUARD’ AT ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY

“With only a few watching from cover, a Tomb Sentinel approached the Unknowns with U.S. flags in hand. As thunder shook the ground and rains washed down without abandon, the Tomb Sentinel pierced through the elements with breath-taking precision.

“He knelt and placed the flags in honor of the Unknowns. For the select few who saw this moment, it was jaw-dropping. Humans have their limits, but The Old Guard has yet to meet theirs.”

TRUMP PAYS RESPECT TO MILITARY DEAD AT ARLINGTON AHEAD OF MEMORIAL DAY

A comment to the post identified the sentinel as Tyler McKee, according to WTHR-TV.

Thousands of homes in the D.C. area lost power in the storm which also knocked down a significant number of trees, WUSA-TV reported.

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Several homes were severely damaged.

Source: Fox News National

An “Old Guard” soldier who was photographed placing a small American flag at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier during a severe thunderstorm is drawing notice ahead of Memorial Day.

The storm hit Thursday in D.C. as members of the 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment, better known as “The Old Guard,” were planting flags at each grave at the cemetery as they do each year at this time.

“During the storm, one of the most extraordinary displays of discipline and dedication to duty ever to be witnessed at Arlington National Cemetery was taking place at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier,” the Old Guard’s Facebook page said in a post.

A severe thunderstorm Thursday failed to stop a sentinel from placing a flag at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

A severe thunderstorm Thursday failed to stop a sentinel from placing a flag at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. (3d U.S. Infantry Regiment)

SEN. COTTON TELLS STORY OF SERVING WITH ‘THE OLD GUARD’ AT ARLINGTON NATIONAL CEMETERY

“With only a few watching from cover, a Tomb Sentinel approached the Unknowns with U.S. flags in hand. As thunder shook the ground and rains washed down without abandon, the Tomb Sentinel pierced through the elements with breath-taking precision.

“He knelt and placed the flags in honor of the Unknowns. For the select few who saw this moment, it was jaw-dropping. Humans have their limits, but The Old Guard has yet to meet theirs.”

TRUMP PAYS RESPECT TO MILITARY DEAD AT ARLINGTON AHEAD OF MEMORIAL DAY

A comment to the post identified the sentinel as Tyler McKee, according to WTHR-TV.

Thousands of homes in the D.C. area lost power in the storm which also knocked down a significant number of trees, WUSA-TV reported.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Several homes were severely damaged.

Source: Fox News National

President Trump greeted military personnel in Alaska during a refueling stop on Friday while on his way to Japan for a state visit.

Trump talked with American troops on the tarmac at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, posed for photos and signed caps.

“Nice stop,” he was heard saying while walking across the tarmac.

TRUMP’S JAPAN VISIT TO FOCUS ON PERSONAL TIES, NOT SUBSTANCE

“We’re here in Alaska, we’re on our way to Japan, we’re with our great military. These are great, great future leaders, right?” Trump said in a video posted on Twitter.

“We just got off the plane, I wanted to say hello, and these are tremendous people,” he continued, pointing at the troops. “So thank you very much.”

Trump also met with Gov. Mike Dunleavy during the stop, discussing issues concerning Alaska such regulations affecting Alaska economy.

Trump was set to arrive in Japan on Saturday evening local time, with the president being the first foreign leader to meet Japan’s new emperor, Naruhito.

TRUMP PAYS RESPECT TO MILITARY DEAD AT ARLINGTON AHEAD OF MEMORIAL DAY

President Donald Trump greets troops after landing at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson for a refueling stop en route to Japan Friday, May 24, 2019, in Anchorage. (Associated Press)

President Donald Trump greets troops after landing at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson for a refueling stop en route to Japan Friday, May 24, 2019, in Anchorage. (Associated Press)

The latest charm offensive from Japan comes amid fears among Japanese leaders that the potential U.S. tariffs on cars could be devastating to the economy.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe likely to use his close relationship with Trump to make sure his country is spared of the tariffs.

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To make that happen, the organizers of the state visit will show Trump the country’s traditions, including meeting the emperor and attending sumo wrestling matches.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump greeted military personnel in Alaska during a refueling stop on Friday while on his way to Japan for a state visit.

Trump talked with American troops on the tarmac at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, posed for photos and signed caps.

“Nice stop,” he was heard saying while walking across the tarmac.

TRUMP’S JAPAN VISIT TO FOCUS ON PERSONAL TIES, NOT SUBSTANCE

“We’re here in Alaska, we’re on our way to Japan, we’re with our great military. These are great, great future leaders, right?” Trump said in a video posted on Twitter.

“We just got off the plane, I wanted to say hello, and these are tremendous people,” he continued, pointing at the troops. “So thank you very much.”

Trump also met with Gov. Mike Dunleavy during the stop, discussing issues concerning Alaska such regulations affecting Alaska economy.

Trump was set to arrive in Japan on Saturday evening local time, with the president being the first foreign leader to meet Japan’s new emperor, Naruhito.

TRUMP PAYS RESPECT TO MILITARY DEAD AT ARLINGTON AHEAD OF MEMORIAL DAY

President Donald Trump greets troops after landing at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson for a refueling stop en route to Japan Friday, May 24, 2019, in Anchorage. (Associated Press)

President Donald Trump greets troops after landing at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson for a refueling stop en route to Japan Friday, May 24, 2019, in Anchorage. (Associated Press)

The latest charm offensive from Japan comes amid fears among Japanese leaders that the potential U.S. tariffs on cars could be devastating to the economy.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe likely to use his close relationship with Trump to make sure his country is spared of the tariffs.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

To make that happen, the organizers of the state visit will show Trump the country’s traditions, including meeting the emperor and attending sumo wrestling matches.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

A federal judge blocked on Friday President Donald Trump from building sections of his long-sought border wall with money secured under his declaration of a national emergency.

U.S. District Judge Haywood Gilliam Jr. on Friday immediately halted the administration’s efforts to redirect military-designated funds for wall construction. His order applies to two projects, scheduled to begin as early as Saturday, to replace 51 miles of fence in two areas on the Mexican border.

Gilliam issued the ruling after hearing arguments last week in two cases. California and 19 other states brought one lawsuit; the Sierra Club and a coalition of communities along the border brought the other. His ruling was the first of several lawsuits against Trump’s controversial decision to bypass the normal appropriations process to pay for his long-sought wall.

“The position that when Congress declines the Executive’s request to appropriate funds, the Executive nonetheless may simply find a way to spend those funds ‘without Congress’ does not square with fundamental separation of powers principles dating back to the earliest days of our Republic,” the judge wrote in granting a temporary injunction to stop construction.

At stake is billions of dollars that would allow Trump to make progress in a signature campaign promise heading into his campaign for a second term.

Trump declared a national emergency in February after losing a fight with the Democratic-led House over fully paying for the wall that led to a 35-day government shutdown. As a compromise on border and immigration enforcement, Congress set aside $1.375 billion to extend or replace existing barriers in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for illegal crossings.

Trump grudgingly accepted the money, but he declared the emergency to siphon money from other government accounts because he wanted to spend $8 billion on wall construction. The funds include $3.6 billion from military construction funds, $2.5 billion from Defense Department counterdrug activities and $600 million from the Treasury Department’s asset forfeiture fund.

The president’s adversaries say the emergency declaration was an illegal attempt to ignore Congress, which authorized far less wall spending than Trump wanted.

“We welcome the court’s decision to block Trump’s attempts to sidestep Congress to build deadly walls that would hurt communities living at the border, endanger wildlife, and have damaging impacts on the environment,” said Andrea Guerrero, a member of the Southern Border Communities Coalition.

The administration said Trump was protecting national security as unprecedented numbers of Central American asylum-seeking families arrive at the U.S. border.

The courtroom showdowns come amid a flurry of activity to accelerate wall construction.

Kenneth Rapuano, an assistant secretary of defense, said in a court filing last month that work on the highest-priority, Pentagon-funded projects could begin as soon as Saturday. The Defense Department has transferred $2.5 billion to border wall coffers.

The Defense Department transferred $1 billion to border wall coffers in March and another $1.5 billion earlier this month. Patrick Shanahan, the acting defense secretary, is expected to decide soon whether to transfer an additional $3.6 billion.

The Army Corps of Engineers recently announced several large contacts with Pentagon funding. Last month, SLSCO Ltd. of Galveston, Texas, won a $789 million award to replace 46 miles (74 kilometers) of barrier in New Mexico.

Last week, Southwest Valley Constructors of Albuquerque, New Mexico, won a $646 million award to replace 63 miles (101 kilometers) in the Border Patrol’s Tucson, Arizona, sector. Barnard Construction Co. of Bozeman, Montana, won a $141.8 million contract to replace 5 miles (8 kilometers) in Yuma and 15 miles (24 kilometers) in El Centro, California.

The administration has planned to use $601 million in Treasury money to extend barriers in the Rio Grande Valley.

Source: Fox News National

The wife of a Marine and veteran firefighter who died following a suicide bombing in Afghanistan said Friday her husband “just did the right thing.”

Shannon Slutman, the widow of Staff Sgt. Christopher Slutman, told “Fox & Friends” her husband was the “most humble man you ever wanted to meet” and always “did what was right.”

“He just did the right thing,” Slutman said. “He didn’t expect anybody to put him up on a pedestal, [or] to put it on Facebook.”

She said Sgt. Slutman was once given an award by the FDNY but didn’t tell anyone about it.

“One of his best friends was so angry with him because he didn’t tell him,” she said.

VETERAN US FIREFIGHTER, AN ‘AMERICAN HERO,’ IDENTIFIED AS ONE OF THREE MARINES KILLED IN AFGHAN BOMB BLAST

She recalled telling her children in the wake of their father’s death he “would want us to be strong and live every day to the fullest because that’s exactly what he did.”

Sgt. Slutman died April 8 near Bagram Airfield, a U.S. military base. Two other members of Slutman’s Massachusetts-based Marine Reserve unit also were killed.

Shannon Slutman said she was overcome with gratitude for the amount of people who came out to express their condolences after her husband’s casket was returned to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware.

She said firetrucks and people with American flags lined roadways and overpasses along their journey back to New York City.

“Private citizens, firemen, police, all the first responders, I mean, it was an extremely emotional experience,” she said.

Frank Siller, of the Tunnels to Towers Foundation, joined Slutman on “Fox & Friends” to show his support for the Gold Star widow and her family.

CLICK TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Siller said his foundation is hoping to help the Slutman family pay off its mortgage.

“What a sacrifice by a husband, a superhero,” he said. “Someone who not only serves his country, also a New York City firefighter who serves his community.”

Fox News’ Greg Norman contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

The wife of a Marine and veteran firefighter who died following a suicide bombing in Afghanistan said Friday her husband “just did the right thing.”

Shannon Slutman, the widow of Staff Sgt. Christopher Slutman, told “Fox & Friends” her husband was the “most humble man you ever wanted to meet” and always “did what was right.”

“He just did the right thing,” Slutman said. “He didn’t expect anybody to put him up on a pedestal, [or] to put it on Facebook.”

She said Sgt. Slutman was once given an award by the FDNY but didn’t tell anyone about it.

“One of his best friends was so angry with him because he didn’t tell him,” she said.

VETERAN US FIREFIGHTER, AN ‘AMERICAN HERO,’ IDENTIFIED AS ONE OF THREE MARINES KILLED IN AFGHAN BOMB BLAST

She recalled telling her children in the wake of their father’s death he “would want us to be strong and live every day to the fullest because that’s exactly what he did.”

Sgt. Slutman died April 8 near Bagram Airfield, a U.S. military base. Two other members of Slutman’s Massachusetts-based Marine Reserve unit also were killed.

Shannon Slutman said she was overcome with gratitude for the amount of people who came out to express their condolences after her husband’s casket was returned to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware.

She said firetrucks and people with American flags lined roadways and overpasses along their journey back to New York City.

“Private citizens, firemen, police, all the first responders, I mean, it was an extremely emotional experience,” she said.

Frank Siller, of the Tunnels to Towers Foundation, joined Slutman on “Fox & Friends” to show his support for the Gold Star widow and her family.

CLICK TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Siller said his foundation is hoping to help the Slutman family pay off its mortgage.

“What a sacrifice by a husband, a superhero,” he said. “Someone who not only serves his country, also a New York City firefighter who serves his community.”

Fox News’ Greg Norman contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National


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