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The bombings in Sri Lanka are unfortunate reminders that from a security standpoint, houses of worship are soft targets. They welcome the young and old as places refuge and faith.

But, the rise in dangerous and lethal attacks is forcing them to become more secure fortresses.

In just the last two years alone, there have been 16 violent attacks on places of worship. Since 2000, there have been 3,195 violent attacks on houses of worship, hitting a peak in 2014.

The High Holy days, for every faith, put police on particularly high alert, because terrorists know they can inflict optimum damage and loss of life.

At St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City, uniformed officers and automatic rifles greet worshippers. And, following the Sri Lanka Easter bombing, Gov. Andrew Cuomo, D-N.Y., announced an effort to step up security.

“During these troubling times, we will not be intimidated by cowardly acts of violence and will continue to do everything in our power to ensure the safety of all New Yorkers,” Cuomo said.

Congress wasted no time reacting, either.

“These terrorist attacks are a stark reminder that Christians remain the most persecuted and targeted religious group in the world,” said Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, “and that we must redouble our efforts to combat religious persecution.”

Across the country, though, many houses of worship lack resources and knowledge about security. Many are unaware that there are millions of dollars in homeland security grant money that can help fund protection efforts like personnel training, security cameras and metal detectors.

FEMA has a one-stop-shopping website to give religious leaders information on how to make their buildings and worshippers more secure.

SRI LANKA EASTER BOMBING CULPRITS REMAIN ELUSIVE

One security expert said while prevention may be difficult, steps can be taken to minimize the risk of attack. For instance, the members themselves could be an extra layer of security.

Steve Padin of Watchmen’s Academy said: “Part of that line of defense are the ushers and the greeters. They can come in and they can always welcome people with a smile and with the handshake and just had that welcoming environment right there. But also their job is to just watch things that seem a little bit off.”

Alert parishioners may have thwarted a worse scenario in San Diego over the weekend when they spotted what appeared to be an emotionally disturbed woman who walked into the church toting an unloaded gun and carrying a baby.

The other line of defense is to try to prevent an attack from happening in the first place.

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“I tell houses of worship that the outside of the facility needs to be monitored either through camera or else by actual people out there,” Padin said, “because they can usually spot incidents right from the exterior and prevent something from that to escalate.”

The security threat for High Holy days is not over. The Jewish Passover continues through sundown Saturday. And millions of Orthodox Christians throughout the world and here in the United States, are just beginning their Holy Week and will celebrate Easter this coming Sunday.

Source: Fox News National

Viji Devadas hasn’t heard from her nephew in Sri Lanka on her family WhatsApp chat group since he reached out just after the Easter Sunday bomb blasts that tore apart churches and hotels and killed hundreds in the South Asian nation.

It’s unsettling, but she knows he’s ok, and the Sri Lankan government’s decision to block most social media, citing concern over “false news reports,” makes sense to her.

In “one way, it’s good because so many rumors and so many things, everybody gets scared,” said Devadas, whose family runs a restaurant named after the Sri Lankan capital, Colombo, in a tiny strip of New York’s Staten Island borough known as “Little Sri Lanka.” At the same time, she hoped it wouldn’t be in place for long, since “people like to see what’s going on and happening.”

The block on social media including Facebook and its WhatsApp and Instagram services was announced by the Sri Lankan government’s official news portal, which cited the spread of misinformation online. The NetBlocks observatory said it detected an intentional blackout of the popular platforms, as well as YouTube, Snapchat and Viber. Twitter appeared unaffected.

Officials likely feared that the spread of inflammatory content could provoke more bloodshed in Sri Lanka, a Buddhist-majority island nation that has large Hindu, Muslim and Christian minorities and a long history of ethnic and sectarian conflict. At least 290 people were killed and 500 people injured in the bombings.

That made sense to Devadas. The government doesn’t “want to get new rumors, they don’t want to get riots,” she said.

James Moses agreed. “I think it’s a good thing, what they have done because … a lot of people give misinformation, and spread that which is not accurate,” said the Sri Lankan immigrant, who also lives on Staten Island. “I see sometimes hatred, violence … put up on social media. That’s not going to help anybody. That’s going to be really a mess.”

The decision by Sri Lankan authorities to flick the off switch on most social media after the attacks was a lightning fast reaction that also reflects accumulated distrust in the capability of American internet companies to control harmful content.

It wasn’t the first time Sri Lanka has blocked social media. The government imposed a weeklong ban in March 2018 because of concerns that WhatsApp and other platforms were being used to fan anti-Muslim violence in the country’s central region.

Ivan Sigal, head of the internet and journalism advocacy organization Global Voices, said the country’s rapid action after Sunday’s attack was a “telling moment.”

“A few years ago we’d be using these platforms to help each other and coordinating assistance. Now we view them as a threat,” he wrote on Twitter.

“If I were Facebook and WhatsApp I’d take a moment to ask myself where I’d gone wrong,” he added. “Cannot think of a clearer signal for lack of platform trust.”

In the past, blocking social media would have been seen as “outrageous censorship,” Sigal said, highlighting the shift in attitudes toward social media sites. “Now we think of it as essential duty of care, to protect ourselves from threat.”

Sri Lanka’s defense ministry said the shutdown would extend until the government wraps up its investigation into the bomb blasts. Sri Lanka’s U.N. ambassador, Amrith Rohan Perera, said in a statement Monday that the blocks aim “to prevent speculative and mischievous attempts to spread rumors.” He also cautioned expatriates to use social media responsibly to support one another but not to inadvertently spread “panic and mistrust.”

NetBlocks, however, said post-attack blackouts can be ineffective.

“What we’ve seen is that when social media is shut down, it creates a vacuum of information that’s readily exploited by other parties,” said Alp Toker, executive director of the London-based group. “It can add to the sense of fear and can cause panic.”

“That’s going to be a problem for people trying to communicate with friends and family,” Toker said.

Some internet users are circumventing the social media blocks by using a virtual private network, which masks the location of a computer, Toker said. An analysis by Sri Lankan researcher and author Yudhanjaya Wijeratne of thousands of Facebook posts made during last year’s ban found that many Sri Lankans simply found ways around it.

Others, like Staten Island resident Dhannitha Meemanage, turned to old-fashioned means of getting news about loved ones after Sunday’s attack — a landline phone.

“Everything is shut down because of this problem,” he said as he bagged cashews in his family’s grocery story in Little Sri Lanka.

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Associated Press writers Matt O’Brien, Stephen Wright and Jennifer Peltz contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

A mother in San Diego holding a 10-month-old baby while waving a gun was tackled at a church on Easter and ultimately arrested after she made threats to blow up the building, according to reports.

A service was ending at the non-denominational Tsidkenu Church in the Clairemont community of San Diego when “a lady came in with a gun and started talking delusional stuff,” Ronald Farmer told Fox 5.

“After she started pointing the gun at the baby, one of the older gentlemen grabbed it from her, and then me and a couple of other men tackled her,” said David Michael Miller, as KABC reported. “We got the baby away from her. A few minutes after that, the cops came in. She was trying to run away or something so a cop tackled her through a row of chairs. They arrested her and pulled another gun out of her bra.”

A mother in San Diego holding a baby and waving a gun was arrested at the Tsidkenu Church in the Clairemont community of San Diego. (Tsidkenu Church San Diego)

A mother in San Diego holding a baby and waving a gun was arrested at the Tsidkenu Church in the Clairemont community of San Diego. (Tsidkenu Church San Diego)

The suspect was identified as Anna Conkey, 31.

No one, including Conkey, was injured. Police said the gun wasn’t loaded.

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San Diego Police Department said she was booked into jail on charges of “making criminal threats and displaying a handgun in a threatening manner.”

“We knew who she was. She had been coming on and off for a little bit of time. And we had been praying for her because we wanted to see her set free,” Ben Wisan, a church leader, said.

Click for more from Fox 5.

Source: Fox News National

Sri Lankan authorities blocked most social media after Easter Sunday attacks killed more than 200 people, with officials saying the temporary move was meant to curtail the spread of false information and ease tensions.

The NetBlocks observatory said it detected an intentional blackout of popular services including Facebook, YouTube, WhatsApp, Instagram, Snapchat and Viber.

The defense ministry said the shutdown would extend until the government concludes its investigation into the bomb blasts that rocked churches, luxury hotels and other sites.

NetBlocks cautioned that such post-attack blackouts are often ineffective.

“What we’ve seen is that when social media is shut down, it creates a vacuum of information that’s readily exploited by other parties,” said Alp Toker, executive director of the London-based group. “It can add to the sense of fear and can cause panic.”

The group said its monitoring of Sri Lankan internet connectivity found no disruptions to the fundamental infrastructure of the internet, meaning the blackout was directed at specific services. Some social media outlets, such as Twitter, appeared unaffected, but the blockage affected popular messaging services.

“That’s going to be a problem for people trying to communicate with friends and family,” Toker said.

Some internet users are circumventing the social media blocks by using a virtual private network, which masks the location of a computer, Toker said.

It isn’t the first time Sri Lanka has blocked social media. The government imposed a weeklong ban in March 2018 because of concerns that WhatsApp and other platforms were being used to fan anti-Muslim violence in the country’s central region.

An analysis by Sri Lankan researcher and author Yudhanjaya Wijeratne of thousands of Facebook posts made during last year’s ban found that many Sri Lankans simply found ways around it. Wijeratne has recommended narrower and more “technically challenging” approaches to curbing hate speech, such as better detection and strengthening local laws.

Facebook, which owns WhatsApp and Instagram, has struggled in recent years to combat the use of its platforms to incite violence and spread hate messages and political propaganda in countries including India, Myanmar and the United States.

The company said in a statement Sunday that it has been working to support first responders and law enforcement in Sri Lanka and identify and remove content that violates company standards.

“We are aware of the government’s statement regarding the temporary blocking of social media platforms,” the company said. “People rely on our services to communicate with their loved ones and we are committed to maintaining our services and helping the community and the country during this tragic time.”

Google didn’t respond to a request for comment about the disruption to its YouTube service in Sri Lanka. Requests for comment made to messaging services Snap and Viber were not returned Sunday.

Source: Fox News National

A group that monitors internet censorship says Sri Lankan authorities have blocked most social media services in the country following the Easter Sunday attacks that killed more than 200 people.

The NetBlocks observatory said it detected an intentional nationwide blackout of popular services including Facebook, YouTube, WhatsApp, Instagram, Snapchat and Viber.

Sri Lankan officials said they were temporarily blocking social media to curtail the spread of false information and ease tensions. The defense ministry said the shutdown would extend until the government concludes its investigation into the bomb blasts that rocked churches and luxury hotels.

NetBlocks cautioned that such post-attack blackouts are often ineffective.

“What we’ve seen is that when social media is shut down, it creates a vacuum of information that’s readily exploited by other parties,” said Alp Toker, executive director of the London-based group. “It can add to the sense of fear and can cause panic.”

The group said its monitoring of Sri Lankan internet connectivity found no disruptions to the fundamental infrastructure of the internet, meaning the blackout was directed at specific services. Some social media outlets, such as Twitter, appeared unaffected, but the blockage affected popular messaging services.

“That’s going to be a problem for people trying to communicate with friends and family,” Toker said.

This isn’t the first time Sri Lanka has blocked social media. The government imposed a weeklong ban in March 2018 because of concerns that WhatsApp and other platforms were being used to fan anti-Muslim violence in the country’s central region.

Facebook, which owns WhatsApp and Instagram, has struggled in recent years to combat the use of its platforms to incite violence and spread hate messages and political propaganda in countries including India, Myanmar and the United States.

The company said in a statement Sunday that it has been working to support first responders and law enforcement in Sri Lanka and identify and remove content that violates company standards.

“We are aware of the government’s statement regarding the temporary blocking of social media platforms,” the company said. “People rely on our services to communicate with their loved ones and we are committed to maintaining our services and helping the community and the country during this tragic time.”

Google didn’t respond to a request for comment about the disruption to its YouTube service in Sri Lanka. Requests for comment made to messaging services Snap and Viber were not immediately returned.

Source: Fox News National

President Donald Trump on Easter morning offered condolences to the people of Sri Lanka, continued his attacks on special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation and attended service at the Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea near his Florida estate.

The president tweeted happy Easter to his many followers earlier in the morning, adding “I have never been happier or more content because your Country is doing so well.”

But Trump followed with several others in which he sought to frame the report as his vindication, though he was clearly bothered by its details. Soon after tweeting about his happiness, he was tweeting again, calling the report “nothing but a total ‘hit job.'”

The president also tweeted about the terrorist attacks in Sri Lanka, saying “we stand ready to help!” Explosions at churches and hotels in that nation killed more than 200 people. No one has claimed responsibility for the attacks; Sri Lanka’s defense minister described the bombings as a terrorist attack by religious extremists.

The president attended service at the Episcopalian church with first lady Melania Trump and daughter Tiffany. It’s the same church where he and the first lady were married in 2005.

“Happy Easter everybody, have a great day,” Trump said upon his arrival at the church. “A lot of great things are happening for our country.”

The Rev. James Harlan encouraged the congregation to continue learning in life and in their faith: “Let’s make sure we’re not being old dogs, unable or unwilling to learn and see something new.”

Prior to the service, Trump tweeted several times about the Mueller report, which was released with redactions the day Trump traveled to Florida for his annual Easter trip here. He golfed with conservative commentator Rush Limbaugh during his stay and time and again returned to tweeting about the report. The tweets were a mixture of declarations of vindication along with attacks on critics, including Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah.

Romney had said he’s “sickened” by the level of dishonesty the special counsel found in President Donald Trump’s administration.

Trump also tweeted Sunday that “Radical Left Democrats” only want to investigate, asserting “This is costing our Country greatly, and will cost the Dems big time in 2020!”

Source: Fox News National

Now that Benjamin Netanyahu is set to serve a fifth term as Israel’s prime minister, he could extend Israeli sovereignty over parts of the West Bank — something he promised to do if re-elected. The move would put an end to decades of Israel’s policy recognizing that the lands it seized in the Six-Day War in 1967 would be part of a negotiated settlement with Palestinians.

Netanyahu made the promise during the final stretch of his election campaign, as he competed for votes with right-wing parties that support annexing part of the West Bank.

David Ha’ivri is a Jewish resident of Kfar Tapuach, an Israeli settlement in Samaria, which is located in the area also known as the West Bank. Ha’ivri said he was “very happy” that Netanyahu is heading toward a record fifth term in office, especially because in interviews in the days before the election, Netanyahu vowed to begin annexing Israeli settlements in the West Bank if re-elected.

According to The Times of Israel, Netanyahu’s pledge came a day after he said on Israel’s Channel 13 news that he told President Trump that he would not evacuate “a single person” from any of the settlements.

NETANYAHU SAYS IF RE-ELECTED HE WILL EXTEND ISRAELI SOVEREIGNTY OVER WEST BANK

If Netanyahu follows through on the promise, it would mark a dramatic development and potentially destroy the already diminishing hope for Palestinian statehood.

Ahmed Majdalani, an aide to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, said the Palestinians will seek the help of the international community to try to block plans to annex parts of the West Bank.

The West Bank is currently home to about 2.8 million Palestinian Arabs and 400,000 Jewish residents in 127 communities commonly referred to as settlements. Israel took control of the land in 1967 and allowed Jewish settlers to move in, but Palestinians consider the West Bank illegally occupied Palestinian land.

Ha’ivri and his wife have lived in the Israeli settlement Kfar Tapuach for nearly three decades and raised their eight children there. Neither he nor the 220 Jewish families in the village are welcome in the Palestinian controlled communities, including the one that is a short walk from his home called Yasuf. The entrance to the Arab village, which is under complete control of the Palestinian Authority, has a sign that reads, “This Road Leads to Palestinian Village The Entrance For Israeli Citizens Is Dangerous.”

Sign outside the Arab village of Yasuf

Sign outside the Arab village of Yasuf

“It’s very unfortunate that there are people who don’t want us to live here. This is our home, this is our homeland. This is where the Jewish people need to be,” said Ha’ivri.

He thinks it’s important to live in the place where his ancestors have lived continuously for thousands of years. It is a feeling shared by many other Jewish people in Samaria including Eliyahu Hillel who owns Kabir Winery in Elon Moreh, an Orthodox Jewish Israeli settlement.

SHOOTING NEAR WEST BANK SETTLEMENT KILLS AT LEAST 2 ISRAELIS

“I’m living in the Bible. For me, the Bible is not history. It’s actuality, it’s present,” said Hillel, whose primary language is Hebrew.

He has lived in Elon Moreh for 35 years and raised his six kids in the Israeli settlement.

Hillel said he doesn’t mind having Palestinians as neighbors.

“It’s not dangerous here. It’s really, really paradise here,” said Hillel.

When asked if he ever feels like his family is in danger he answered, “Not very, not very.”

ISRAELI ARMY PROBES SHOOTING DEATH OF WEST BANK PALESTINIAN

In addition to the wineries, there are many factories in Samaria. Israelis are not permitted to work in Palestinian controlled territories but, according to local officials, most of the factory workers are Palestinian at the three industrial parks in Israeli-controlled Samaria.

“This (is an) injection molding factory named ‘Twitoplast,’ we do all the product(s) for the air condition business,” said Moshe Lev-ran, Twitoplast’s Export Manager, as he described the factory which is in an industrial zone in Samaria called Barkan. He said the factory has about 150 employees and half are Palestinian.

When a Palestinian employee was asked if he likes working at Twitoplast he said “yes,” adding that he doesn’t mind working with Jewish people. The employee doesn’t speak English and when asked in Hebrew if there are any problems he answered, “I am supposed to bring food for my kids, what am I supposed to do?”

Sofian Dagger is a Palestinian employee at Twitoplast, an Israeli plastics company in the West Bank. 

Sofian Dagger is a Palestinian employee at Twitoplast, an Israeli plastics company in the West Bank. 

Sofian Dagger, the plant manager, is also Palestinian. He has been working at Twitoplast for 20 years. He also does not speak English and when asked in Hebrew how it is for him to work in a factory with Jewish people and Arabs together he said, “We work together, it’s fine.”

When asked if he ever encounters any problems working for an Israeli company he said in Hebrew, “None at all. All my brothers, I have seven brothers, they all work for Jewish people.”

Dagger says he chose to work at Twitoplast because “the money is good,” adding that the salary is better than any other place in the area. Dagger said that his son also works at the factory for the same reason.

According to Lev-ran, Twitoplast employees earn about 15-hundred dollars a month, which is more than double the wages of those employed in the Palestinian Authority, or PA governed areas. Palestinian employees at the factory also get benefits like social security, which Lev-ran said, they wouldn’t receive if they worked in areas governed by the PA.

Since Israelis and Palestinians work well together at Twitoplast, Dagger wonders why there can’t be peace everywhere.

Sofian Dagger, Palestinian employee at Twitoplast 

Sofian Dagger, Palestinian employee at Twitoplast 

“I am asking everyone that there will be peace for everyone in the whole world. Not just in Israel, not just in Palestine, not just in America. We need peace, for the sake of the children. It’s a shame to have wars, it’s a shame,” said Dagger.

When asked if he thinks peace can be achieved he said, “Why not? It can happen.”

Lev-ran said he hopes Twitoplast proves that Palestinians and Israelis can coexist. He thinks peace will come when Palestinians prosper.

“A Palestinian that wake(s up) at 4 o’clock in the morning to come to work. He think(s) only one thing, how to bring food to his kids, that’s what he think(s). He doesn’t think how to kill me,” said Lev-ran. “So they ask me if I’m not worried when I come here to work. I’m not worried at all, we don’t carry weapons here. I’m more worried in my Kibbutz (a communal settlement in Israel), which is near Gaza that I have 30 seconds to run to the shelter house when they shoot me a rocket, the Hamas. But if I provide the people in Gaza Strip work, they will fight against the Hamas and nobody will shoot me a rocket.”

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When asked what he thinks about a company like Twitoplast, where Palestinians and Israelis work together, Ha’ivri answered, “I think that that is wonderful and I think that many people outside of this area are not aware of those facts on the ground.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report. The video for this story was shot and edited by Talia Kaplan. Lexi Baker contributed to the filming of this piece. Stock footage provided by Pond5 and Shutterstock. Song: “The Legitimates” by Lionel Cohen.

Source: Fox News World

The Latest on the investigation of a woman believed to have posed a threat to schools in Colorado (all times local):

9:40 p.m.

Columbine High School is moving ahead with ceremonies marking the 20th anniversary of an attack that killed 13 people, and the community is awaiting more details on what led a teenager allegedly obsessed with the 1999 shooting to buy a shotgun and kill herself in the snowy foothills nearby.

A religious service Thursday night kicked off three days of commemorative events leading to a day of community service projects and a ceremony Saturday at a park near the school.

An already tense time at the school was exacerbated after 18-year-old Sol Pais traveled to Denver from Miami on Monday and immediately bought a pump-action shotgun.

Her body was found Wednesday, about 24 hours after Columbine and other schools locked their doors in response to fears that she intended to carry out her own attack.

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9:20 a.m.

Colorado schools that were shuttered just ahead of the 20th anniversary of the Columbine school shooting have reopened, a day after authorities found the body of a young Florida woman who was obsessed with the shooting. Many schools imposed increased security measures when they reopened on Thursday.

The FBI said the body of Sol Pais was discovered Wednesday in mountains outside Denver with what appeared to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Columbine and dozens of other schools were closed Wednesday because of fears that Pais posed a threat. About 500,000 students in the area that includes metropolitan Denver and Colorado Springs were affected.

Authorities say Pais never threatened a specific school but made troubling remarks to others about her “infatuation” with the 1999 shootings. The FBI also says Pais purchased a shotgun immediately after arriving in Colorado on Monday.

The school closures affected about 500,000 students.

Events planned to mark the anniversary of the 1999 Columbine attack will go on as scheduled throughout the week, including a ceremony near the school on Saturday.

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11:10 p.m.

Authorities want to ensure that a Florida teenager who was obsessed with the Columbine school shooting was acting alone as dozens of Denver-area schools plan to reopen following a region-wide hunt for the young woman.

The FBI said the body of Sol Pais was discovered in the mountains outside Denver with what appeared to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound on Wednesday, about 24 hours after Columbine and other schools locked their doors in response to fears that she intended to carry out her own attack.

Authorities say Pais never threatened a specific school but made troubling remarks to others about her “infatuation” with the 1999 shootings. The FBI also says Pais purchased a shotgun immediately after arriving in Colorado on Monday.

The anniversary of the Columbine attack is Saturday.

Source: Fox News National

The man who allegedly brought gas cans and lighter fluid into St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City has taught philosophy at different colleges in New York and New Jersey, school officials said.

Marc Lamparello, 37, was arrested on Wednesday night and was charged with attempted arson and reckless endangerment. He was taken into custody after a security guard at the cathedral on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan spotted him.

RELATED: MAN CAUGHT WITH 2 GAS CANS ENTERING ST. PATRICK’S CATHEDRAL IN NYC, POLICE SAY

He was cooperative but acted evasively, the New York Police Department said. Lamparello allegedly told officers that he was “cutting through the cathedral to get to Madison Avenue” and that “his car ran out of gas,” police said. But when police reportedly checked the man’s minivan, it’s gas tank wasn’t empty.

John Miller, the NYPD’s deputy commissioner of intelligence and counterterrorism, said surveillance camera footage showed Lamparello circling St. Patrick’s several times in a minivan well over an hour before he parked outside the cathedral on Fifth Avenue, walked around the area, returned to his vehicle, and retrieved the gasoline and lighter fluid.

Marc Lamparello, 37, was arrested on Wednesday after he was caught was gasoline and lighter fluid at St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York.

Marc Lamparello, 37, was arrested on Wednesday after he was caught was gasoline and lighter fluid at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

The incident at the cathedral came two days after Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris was ravaged by a fire that investigators said Thursday was most likely electrical. After Lamparello’s arrest, police said there “doesn’t appear to be any connection to any terrorist group or any terrorist-related intent here.”

Lamparello was also arrested on Monday in Newark, New Jersey after he allegedly wouldn’t leave the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart at closing time after a late Mass.

NOTRE DAME FIRE LIKELY CAUSED BY ELECTRICAL SHORT-CIRCUIT, INVESTIGATORS BELIEVE

The man was calm and respectful to officers but was adamant about not leaving the cathedral, according to the Essex County Sheriff’s Office.

“He said, ‘This is a house of God, it should be open, I’m not leaving. You’ll have to lock me up,'” Sheriff Armando Fontoura said.

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Lamparello has worked as a part-time online instructor at Lehman College in New York, and taught philosophy as a part-time adjunct instructor at Seton Hall University in New Jersey, both schools confirmed to Fox News on Thursday.

Brooklyn College said in a statement that because Lamparello is a PhD student at the College of New York’s Graduate Center, he is required to teach a course on campus, and was assigned to the school.

Sarah Ramsey, a spokesperson for Lehman, said the school is aware of what happened at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, and is “taking appropriate steps to terminate the individual’s employment with the college,” while Seton Hall said Lamparella is no longer working with the university, as their “top priority is the education and welfare of our students and the entire campus community.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

A psychiatrist has identified mental illnesses in the man accused of fatally shooting a woman and wounding seven people at a Tennessee church in 2017.

According to The Tennessean , a defense attorney read report excerpts about 27-year-old Emanuel Kidega Samson in a Nashville court Wednesday.

The psychiatrist diagnosed Samson with “schizoaffective disorder bipolar type” and post-traumatic stress disorder after an abusive, violent upbringing.

He found Samson heard voices, hallucinated and had intense mood swings, with “delusional beliefs” about predicting the future and controlling people with his mind.

He determined Samson’s mental disease drove his actions in the Nashville shooting at Burnette Chapel Church of Christ. He couldn’t say if the insanity defense legal standard was met.

Prosecutors have said they’re seeking life without parole for Samson, who faces first-degree murder and other charges.

Source: Fox News National


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