fox-news/us/us-regions/southwest/arizona

A 97-year-old woman who died in December was buried by her son in her backyard — all because he wanted to keep cashing her monthly benefit checks, Arizona authorities said.

Leonie Shannon’s body was unearthed Wednesday in San Tan Valley pursuant to a search warrant, the Pinal County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release.

Daniel Shannon, 66, was charged with fraud and improper disposal of his mother’s body, the news release said.

MAINE MAN USED UNSUSPECTING FATHER AS GETAWAY DRIVER FOR BANK ROBBERY, POLICE SAY

“Our detectives did a great job on this case, and in bringing Mr. Daniels to justice,” Sheriff Mark Lamb said. “These types of cases are especially troublesome when the crimes involve family members.”

Mugshot for Daniel Shannon, 66,

Mugshot for Daniel Shannon, 66, (Pinal County Sheriff’s Office )

Detectives were tipped off to the alleged scheme by a person who was concerned the mother hadn’t been seen in some time, FOX10 Phoenix reported.

Shannon initially said the woman wandered off and never returned, but then allegedly admitted she passed away on Dec. 21, according to the station.

MOLDOVAN MAN ACCUSED OF FAKING OWN DEATH FOR $2M INSURANCE PAYOUT PLEADS GUILTY IN MINNESOTA COURT

The sheriff’s office says Shannon decided not to report her death and bury her in the backyard so he could continue to cash the checks she was drawing from Social Security and the Veterans Administration, the station reported.

Shannon allegedly told detectives he needed to keep getting the benefit money in order to help pay for a patent on his invention, the news release said.

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The sheriff’s office offered no information on the invention.

Source: Fox News National

A 97-year-old woman who died in December was buried by her son in her backyard — all because he wanted to keep cashing her monthly benefit checks, Arizona authorities said.

Leonie Shannon’s body was unearthed Wednesday in San Tan Valley pursuant to a search warrant, the Pinal County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release.

Daniel Shannon, 66, was charged with fraud and improper disposal of his mother’s body, the news release said.

MAINE MAN USED UNSUSPECTING FATHER AS GETAWAY DRIVER FOR BANK ROBBERY, POLICE SAY

“Our detectives did a great job on this case, and in bringing Mr. Daniels to justice,” Sheriff Mark Lamb said. “These types of cases are especially troublesome when the crimes involve family members.”

Mugshot for Daniel Shannon, 66,

Mugshot for Daniel Shannon, 66, (Pinal County Sheriff’s Office )

Detectives were tipped off to the alleged scheme by a person who was concerned the mother hadn’t been seen in some time, FOX10 Phoenix reported.

Shannon initially said the woman wandered off and never returned, but then allegedly admitted she passed away on Dec. 21, according to the station.

MOLDOVAN MAN ACCUSED OF FAKING OWN DEATH FOR $2M INSURANCE PAYOUT PLEADS GUILTY IN MINNESOTA COURT

The sheriff’s office says Shannon decided not to report her death and bury her in the backyard so he could continue to cash the checks she was drawing from Social Security and the Veterans Administration, the station reported.

Shannon allegedly told detectives he needed to keep getting the benefit money in order to help pay for a patent on his invention, the news release said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The sheriff’s office offered no information on the invention.

Source: Fox News National

The incapacitated woman who unexpectedly gave birth at an Arizona healthcare facility —  and who was subsequently revealed to be a victim of rape — may have been raped and impregnated before, her family wrote in court documents.

Family members of the unidentified woman, who’d been receiving long-term care since a near-drowning incident when she was 3, said in a notice of claim that doctors treating her on the December day she gave birth observed signs the pregnancy may not have been her first, FOX10 Phoenix reported.

NATHAN SUTHERLAND, NURSE ACCUSED OF IMPREGNATING INCAPACITATED WOMAN AT ARIZONA FACILITY, WAS CHRISTIAN RAPPER

The doctor’s exam reportedly found lacerations that were several years old and had already healed, according to NBC News, which cited a court document. Doctors said the tears were “not caused as a result of this delivery.”

The documents also allege the woman’s family requested she be attended to by only female nurses – a request they say was ignored by Hacienda Healthcare, according to FOX10 Phoenix.

One licensed practical nurse at the facility, 36-year-old Nathan Sutherland, is accused of raping the 29-year-old victim at the facility and fathering her baby boy. Sutherland has pleaded not guilty.

Employees at the facility at the time said they didn’t know the victim was pregnant. Court records said the woman’s last known physical was in April — about nine months before she gave birth.

Investigators tested the DNA of all male employees who worked at the facility and later said Sutherland’s DNA matched a sample from the newborn child. Sutherland’s attorney has challenged that conclusion, however, and contends there’s no direct evidence linking his client to the alleged rape.

The Dec. 29 birth triggered reviews by state agencies and highlighted safety concerns for patients who are severely disabled or incapacitated. The incident also prompted the resignations of Hacienda’s chief executive and one of the victim’s doctors.

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The woman’s parents, through their attorney, have disputed previous characterizations that their daughter is comatose or in a vegetative state, according to the Associated Press. They described her as being intellectually disabled because of seizures in early childhood. While she doesn’t speak, she has some mobility in her limbs, head and neck. She also responds to sound and can make facial gestures.

Fox News’ Travis Fedschun and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

An investigation into one woman’s report of a sex assault led to the arrest of a border patrol agent in Arizona this week — and allegations the man assaulted several other women during a seven-year span.

Steven Charles Holmes, 33, was arrested Tuesday on three counts of sexual assault and three counts of aggravated assault, according to a criminal complaint obtained by Tucson News Now.

Prosecutors allege Holmes sexually assaulted multiple women between January 2012 and January 2019.

Steven Charles Holmes, 33, was arrested Tuesday and charged with five felony counts of assault. 

Steven Charles Holmes, 33, was arrested Tuesday and charged with five felony counts of assault.  (Tucson Police Department)

NYPD OFFICER ARRESTED IN CONNECTION WITH PLOT TO HIRE HITMAN TO KILL ESTRANGED HUSBAND AND BOYFRIEND’S DAUGHTER

The initial investigation into Holmes began last week when a woman told investigators with the Tucson Police Department that she was sexually assaulted while on a date with a man she met using an online dating app, KOLD reported.

Holmes was soon identified as a suspect and, as investigators dug further, other allegations began to arise.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection did not immediately return Fox News’ request for a comment but, in a statement provided to KOLD, the agency said that Holmes had been an agent at the Tucson Station for seven years and would be placed on “administrative duties” pending the outcome of the investigation.

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“The U.S. Border Patrol stresses honor and integrity in every aspect of its mission. We do not tolerate misconduct on, or off duty, and will fully cooperate with all investigations of alleged misconduct by our personnel,” the statement read.

A search for Holmes in the Prima County Jail records showed he was being held on a $25,000 bond as of Thursday.

Source: Fox News National

An investigation into one woman’s report of a sex assault led to the arrest of a border patrol agent in Arizona this week — and allegations the man assaulted several other women during a seven-year span.

Steven Charles Holmes, 33, was arrested Tuesday on three counts of sexual assault and three counts of aggravated assault, according to a criminal complaint obtained by Tucson News Now.

Prosecutors allege Holmes sexually assaulted multiple women between January 2012 and January 2019.

Steven Charles Holmes, 33, was arrested Tuesday and charged with five felony counts of assault. 

Steven Charles Holmes, 33, was arrested Tuesday and charged with five felony counts of assault.  (Tucson Police Department)

NYPD OFFICER ARRESTED IN CONNECTION WITH PLOT TO HIRE HITMAN TO KILL ESTRANGED HUSBAND AND BOYFRIEND’S DAUGHTER

The initial investigation into Holmes began last week when a woman told investigators with the Tucson Police Department that she was sexually assaulted while on a date with a man she met using an online dating app, KOLD reported.

Holmes was soon identified as a suspect and, as investigators dug further, other allegations began to arise.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection did not immediately return Fox News’ request for a comment but, in a statement provided to KOLD, the agency said that Holmes had been an agent at the Tucson Station for seven years and would be placed on “administrative duties” pending the outcome of the investigation.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“The U.S. Border Patrol stresses honor and integrity in every aspect of its mission. We do not tolerate misconduct on, or off duty, and will fully cooperate with all investigations of alleged misconduct by our personnel,” the statement read.

A search for Holmes in the Prima County Jail records showed he was being held on a $25,000 bond as of Thursday.

Source: Fox News National

How do you teach young Americans about adulthood?

Work ethic, but also a free car.

Six students with perfect attendance at the East Valley Institute of Technology in Mesa, Ariz., faced off in a contest with the winner taking home a Chrysler PT Cruiser, Fox 10 Phoenix reported. Each of the students got a box, but only one had the key to start the car.

GROUP WANTS TENNESSEE DA TO RESIGN OVER ANTI-ISLAM POST

“Some of the soft skills, like punctuality and attendance, matter in the work field just as much as the academics do,” said interim Superintendent Chad Wilson.

Saguaro High School junior Michael Duarte was the lucky winner.

“Surprised I guess,” said Duarte. “Wasn’t really expecting to win today but it’s cool I did.”

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He may be modest, but he was gunning for the top prize.

“Just tell myself every day, don’t be late, because I might win that car,” said Duarte.

Click for more from Fox 10 Phoenix.

Frank Miles is a reporter and editor covering geopolitics, military, crime, technology and sports for FoxNews.com. His email is Frank.Miles@foxnews.com.

Source: Fox News National

How do you teach young Americans about adulthood?

Work ethic, but also a free car.

Six students with perfect attendance at the East Valley Institute of Technology in Mesa, Ariz., faced off in a contest with the winner taking home a Chrysler PT Cruiser, Fox 10 Phoenix reported. Each of the students got a box, but only one had the key to start the car.

GROUP WANTS TENNESSEE DA TO RESIGN OVER ANTI-ISLAM POST

“Some of the soft skills, like punctuality and attendance, matter in the work field just as much as the academics do,” said interim Superintendent Chad Wilson.

Saguaro High School junior Michael Duarte was the lucky winner.

“Surprised I guess,” said Duarte. “Wasn’t really expecting to win today but it’s cool I did.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

He may be modest, but he was gunning for the top prize.

“Just tell myself every day, don’t be late, because I might win that car,” said Duarte.

Click for more from Fox 10 Phoenix.

Frank Miles is a reporter and editor covering geopolitics, military, crime, technology and sports for FoxNews.com. His email is Frank.Miles@foxnews.com.

Source: Fox News National

TUCSON, Ariz. — The San Rita Mountains, nestled in the Coronado National Forest, is home to Juniper trees, a variety of birds and even wildcats like ocelots and jaguars.

But soon, it may also be the site of the third largest copper mine in the country.

The fully-permitted project will excavate a roughly 6,500-foot-wide and 2,900-foot-deep pit, in addition to an on-site facility. Officials at Hudbay, a Toronto-based mining company that plans to develop the mine, say the structure could “fundamentally change mining,” with its dry stack tailing technology to significantly reduce water usage.

PERU’S MILITARY TRIES TO CURB ILLEGAL GOLD MINING IN AMAZON

“We’ve participated in this project for the last 12 years and we’ve listened to the community and we’ve changed our designs,” Kathy Arnold, environment director for Hudbay, told Fox News. “We’ve modified the work that we’re going to do and we’ve used the latest technologies to make sure that we can protect the environment.”

A view of the Santa Rita Mountains off of Highway 83 where the proposed Rosemont Mine site will be built.

A view of the Santa Rita Mountains off of Highway 83 where the proposed Rosemont Mine site will be built. (Ben Brown / Fox News)

But the proposed mine is facing lawsuits and a large wave of opposition.

For more than a decade, environmentalists and local tribes have been pushing back on the development of the mine, arguing it would destroy sacred lands, pollute the region’s water supply and have adverse effects on wildlife.

“This is about the sacred nature of this whole ecosystem,” said Steve Brown, a member of the Save the Scenic Santa Ritas (SSSR), an organization suing Hudbay. “You’re going to say, ‘well, not my backyard.’ But this is the backyard for the ocelot, for the jaguar, for the mountain lions, for the deer, for everything that holds us together.”

TRIBES, ENVIRONMENTALISTS BATTLE COPPER MINE IN ARIZONA

The $1.9 billion Rosemont Mine project would generate an average of 500 new jobs and inject $16 billion into the local and regional economy, the company said. Copper is huge in Arizona — the state produces about two-thirds of the country’s supply for wiring and electronics, according to the Washington Post. 

“Its impacts,”  Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry spokesman Garrick Taylor told the Post, “will be measured in the billions of dollars.”

But Shinsky said the financial boon would come at a heavy cost.

“People come out here to do birdwatching for hiking or camping – all of that will be decimated once this mine goes in,” Shinsky said.

The Pima County Board of Supervisors resolution in late April noted that the proposed jobs at Rosemont are “important but may need to be put in the larger perspective of the region and what has been accomplished in job growth.”

Mark Williams is fighting to prevent the mine coming to the Coronado National Forest.

Mark Williams is fighting to prevent the mine coming to the Coronado National Forest. (Ben Brown / Fox News)

Environmental groups point specifically to concerns about the watershed that flows out of the same region as the proposed mine.

THIRD-BIGGEST US COAL COMPANY FILES FOR BANKRUPTCY

“They laugh at us, Rosemont does, when we say not only will water quantity be robbed but water quality is going to be ignored,” Shinsky said. “They say, ‘Well, that’s 10 miles away’ and we say, ‘yeah it is, but the water will be polluted at the connection of Davidson Canyon and Barrell Canyon and flow 10 miles underground and get here [Cienega Creek] – then it’s headed for the city of Tucson.”

Hudbay argues that given the roughly seven-mile distance from the mine site to Cienega Creek, “impacts that would be direct would be almost impossible.”

“The water is all maintained on site. There is no process water that leaves the system. It’s all maintained in ponds tanks and in the process itself. So there is a very small amount of water that goes out to the tailings,” Arnold said. “It’s about 15 percent water and that’s like a consistency of damp sand. So, it’s not running water like you would think. There will be some seepage and we did those calculations but none of the seepage is of a nature that would cause any concern to the groundwater.”

John Lacy, a mining law expert at the University of Arizona, said the pit will mainly be hidden by the mountains and the only thing obstructing the view might be some of the infrastructure.

He noted that one thing that always struck him about the “process itself at Rosemont, is that long before the mine itself was proposed, the property was up for sale and the [Pima] county was given the opportunity to buy the property,” adding “it seems, to me, a little disingenuous of the county to make such an overt objection to the mine.”

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service consulted on the Rosemont mine project in 2013 and in 2016, concluding that “the project may affect (adversely) 13 different threatened/endangered species,” and told Fox News via email “the Forest Service through Hudbay committed to conservation efforts that minimize these effects to the point where they will not jeopardize the survival of these species.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Environmentalists believe Cienega Creek will be contaimnated if the mine is built.

Environmentalists believe Cienega Creek will be contaimnated if the mine is built. (Ben Brown / Fox News)

SSSR and three local tribes filed separate injunctions last week. There are also a handful of other lawsuits in what may be their last hope to stop Hudbay from starting construction on the mine.

“Our next step is to keep on fighting. We have lawsuits, as you know, in progress. We have scientific evidence. We have political events. We’ve got the tribes talking about their sacred ancestral lands. Combine those three together that makes a pretty good case,” Brown said. “We aren’t against mining we aren’t against copper. We’re against this mine in this place at this time.”

Work on the mine is expected to begin in about a month, and Lauzon hopes the two sides can find common ground moving forward.

“We don’t believe it’s a choice. We think modern mining is something that enables us to take into consideration from all the different people’s viewpoints and, with those considerations, come up with ways that we can co-exist,” he said.

Source: Fox News National

TUCSON, Ariz. — The San Rita Mountains, nestled in the Coronado National Forest, is home to Juniper trees, a variety of birds and even wildcats like ocelots and jaguars.

But soon, it may also be the site of the third largest copper mine in the country.

The fully-permitted project will excavate a roughly 6,500-foot-wide and 2,900-foot-deep pit, in addition to an on-site facility. Officials at Hudbay, a Toronto-based mining company that plans to develop the mine, say the structure could “fundamentally change mining,” with its dry stack tailing technology to significantly reduce water usage.

PERU’S MILITARY TRIES TO CURB ILLEGAL GOLD MINING IN AMAZON

“We’ve participated in this project for the last 12 years and we’ve listened to the community and we’ve changed our designs,” Kathy Arnold, environment director for Hudbay, told Fox News. “We’ve modified the work that we’re going to do and we’ve used the latest technologies to make sure that we can protect the environment.”

A view of the Santa Rita Mountains off of Highway 83 where the proposed Rosemont Mine site will be built.

A view of the Santa Rita Mountains off of Highway 83 where the proposed Rosemont Mine site will be built. (Ben Brown / Fox News)

But the proposed mine is facing lawsuits and a large wave of opposition.

For more than a decade, environmentalists and local tribes have been pushing back on the development of the mine, arguing it would destroy sacred lands, pollute the region’s water supply and have adverse effects on wildlife.

“This is about the sacred nature of this whole ecosystem,” said Steve Brown, a member of the Save the Scenic Santa Ritas (SSSR), an organization suing Hudbay. “You’re going to say, ‘well, not my backyard.’ But this is the backyard for the ocelot, for the jaguar, for the mountain lions, for the deer, for everything that holds us together.”

TRIBES, ENVIRONMENTALISTS BATTLE COPPER MINE IN ARIZONA

The $1.9 billion Rosemont Mine project would generate an average of 500 new jobs and inject $16 billion into the local and regional economy, the company said. Copper is huge in Arizona — the state produces about two-thirds of the country’s supply for wiring and electronics, according to the Washington Post. 

“Its impacts,”  Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry spokesman Garrick Taylor told the Post, “will be measured in the billions of dollars.”

But Shinsky said the financial boon would come at a heavy cost.

“People come out here to do birdwatching for hiking or camping – all of that will be decimated once this mine goes in,” Shinsky said.

The Pima County Board of Supervisors resolution in late April noted that the proposed jobs at Rosemont are “important but may need to be put in the larger perspective of the region and what has been accomplished in job growth.”

Mark Williams is fighting to prevent the mine coming to the Coronado National Forest.

Mark Williams is fighting to prevent the mine coming to the Coronado National Forest. (Ben Brown / Fox News)

Environmental groups point specifically to concerns about the watershed that flows out of the same region as the proposed mine.

THIRD-BIGGEST US COAL COMPANY FILES FOR BANKRUPTCY

“They laugh at us, Rosemont does, when we say not only will water quantity be robbed but water quality is going to be ignored,” Shinsky said. “They say, ‘Well, that’s 10 miles away’ and we say, ‘yeah it is, but the water will be polluted at the connection of Davidson Canyon and Barrell Canyon and flow 10 miles underground and get here [Cienega Creek] – then it’s headed for the city of Tucson.”

Hudbay argues that given the roughly seven-mile distance from the mine site to Cienega Creek, “impacts that would be direct would be almost impossible.”

“The water is all maintained on site. There is no process water that leaves the system. It’s all maintained in ponds tanks and in the process itself. So there is a very small amount of water that goes out to the tailings,” Arnold said. “It’s about 15 percent water and that’s like a consistency of damp sand. So, it’s not running water like you would think. There will be some seepage and we did those calculations but none of the seepage is of a nature that would cause any concern to the groundwater.”

John Lacy, a mining law expert at the University of Arizona, said the pit will mainly be hidden by the mountains and the only thing obstructing the view might be some of the infrastructure.

He noted that one thing that always struck him about the “process itself at Rosemont, is that long before the mine itself was proposed, the property was up for sale and the [Pima] county was given the opportunity to buy the property,” adding “it seems, to me, a little disingenuous of the county to make such an overt objection to the mine.”

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service consulted on the Rosemont mine project in 2013 and in 2016, concluding that “the project may affect (adversely) 13 different threatened/endangered species,” and told Fox News via email “the Forest Service through Hudbay committed to conservation efforts that minimize these effects to the point where they will not jeopardize the survival of these species.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Environmentalists believe Cienega Creek will be contaimnated if the mine is built.

Environmentalists believe Cienega Creek will be contaimnated if the mine is built. (Ben Brown / Fox News)

SSSR and three local tribes filed separate injunctions last week. There are also a handful of other lawsuits in what may be their last hope to stop Hudbay from starting construction on the mine.

“Our next step is to keep on fighting. We have lawsuits, as you know, in progress. We have scientific evidence. We have political events. We’ve got the tribes talking about their sacred ancestral lands. Combine those three together that makes a pretty good case,” Brown said. “We aren’t against mining we aren’t against copper. We’re against this mine in this place at this time.”

Work on the mine is expected to begin in about a month, and Lauzon hopes the two sides can find common ground moving forward.

“We don’t believe it’s a choice. We think modern mining is something that enables us to take into consideration from all the different people’s viewpoints and, with those considerations, come up with ways that we can co-exist,” he said.

Source: Fox News National

The teenage girl who officials say was abducted Sunday from her job at an Idaho Wendy’s was reportedly located unharmed in Arizona on Tuesday morning.

Sandra Rios-Chavez, 17, was last seen Sunday at around 6 p.m. at a Wendy’s fast food restaurant in Jerome, about 116 miles southeast of Boise, FOX10 reported.

Police say they believe she was forcibly taken from the fast food restaurant by 18-year-old Miguel Rodriguez-Perez.

The Arizona Department of Transportation issued an amber alert Monday after Perez’s cell phone was tracked to Kingman, Ariz. Authorities noted Rodriguez-Perez had known contacts in Mexico.

The initial amber alert stated Chavez had an order of protection against Perez after he allegedly threatened and assaulted her in the past, KNXV reported.

Officers with the Surprise Police Department were patrolling an area of the city early Tuesday morning when they located a vehicle that matched the description of Perez’s car, FOX10 reported. Officers attempted to make a traffic stop but the vehicle took off.  It was later found abandoned nearby.

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Police searched the area and soon located Chavez and Perez.

Perez was taken into custody but it was not immediately clear if he would be facing any charges.

Source: Fox News National


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