fox-news/world/environment

Family, friends and supporters have welcomed a veteran Sherpa guide upon his return to Nepal’s capital days after his 24th climb of Mount Everest extended his record.

Kami Rita flew back Saturday from Everest to Kathmandu, where he was greeted by the waiting crowd at the airport.

His wife hugged him and the crowd covered him with a cream-colored scarf and offered him yogurt.

The brief celebration at the airport parking area with traditional drums was followed by Rita riding on a truck waving to supporters as they drove out of the airport.

He told reporters he was very happy but was exhausted.

Rita reached Everest’s 8,850-meter (29,035-foot) peak on Tuesday, the second time he had climbed to the summit in a week.

Source: Fox News World

A Mexican Navy helicopter with five crew members aboard crashed Friday in a mountainous area while carrying water to help fight forest fires.

The Navy said rescuers were searching for the crew of the Russian-made MI-17 transport helicopter and it was not clear if any had survived.

President Andrés Manuel López Obrador wrote in a Tweet that “we hope with all our hearts that these five public servants are alive.”

The north-central state of Queretaro has been using helicopters to help fight a series of forest fires in the pine-covered mountains known as the Sierra Gorda. The chopper was carrying a 660 gallon (2,500 liter) helicopter bucket filled with water when it went down.

The crash occurred in the township of Jalpan de la Sierra, located on a high mountain range that drops abruptly onto Mexico’s Gulf coast plain.

Mexico has suffered hundreds of brush, pasture and forest fires in recent weeks amid very hot, dry conditions.

Source: Fox News World

Bali’s airport has canceled flights following an eruption of the Mount Agung volcano that spread ash over the south of the Indonesian island.

The national disaster agency said Friday night’s eruption lasted four minutes and 30 seconds and spread lava and incandescent rocks about 3 kilometers (1.8 miles) from the crater.

Nine villages experienced thick ash fall. But the agency said it wasn’t raising the alert level for the volcano and its exclusion zone remains a 4-kilometer (2.5-mile) radius around the crater.

The Directorate General of Air Transportation said four flights to Bali were diverted and five flights out of the popular tourist destination were canceled because of volcanic ash.

Agung became active again in 2017 after more than a half century of slumber following a major eruption in 1963.

Source: Fox News World

Bali’s airport has canceled flights following an eruption of the Mount Agung volcano that spread ash over the south of the Indonesian island.

The national disaster agency said Friday night’s eruption lasted four minutes and 30 seconds and spread lava and incandescent rocks about 3 kilometers (1.8 miles) from the crater.

Nine villages experienced thick ash fall. But the agency said it wasn’t raising the alert level for the volcano and its exclusion zone remains a 4-kilometer (2.5-mile) radius around the crater.

The Directorate General of Air Transportation said four flights to Bali were diverted and five flights out of the popular tourist destination were canceled because of volcanic ash.

Agung became active again in 2017 after more than a half century of slumber following a major eruption in 1963.

Source: Fox News World

Climate change activists in Latin America rallied for action on global warming Friday, heeding a call by Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg to hold demonstrations across the world.

In Rio de Janeiro, a small group of students gathered outside the state legislature to deliver a letter dated from the future in which they lamented Brazil’s loss of coastline, rainforests and species.

“We, the Brazilians of the future, are also asking you: is there anything more important than protecting life and ensuring a quality future for the next generations? No, there is not,” they wrote.

In more than a dozen other cities throughout the country, youth also staged strikes and took to the streets, using the issue to challenge the environmental policies of the far-right government of President Jair Bolsonaro.

Bolsonaro says excessive regulation has hindered economic development and has moved to strip the environment ministry’s authority over water and forestry services.

Last week, his environment minister questioned the effectiveness of the Amazon Fund created to contain deforestation. The minister has also called climate change a “secondary issue” and said that agribusiness in Brazil is “under threat.”

Meanwhile, in the Venezuelan capital of Caracas, a few dozen protesters explicitly abstained from commenting on politics amid a monthslong standoff between President Nicolás Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaidó.

Andreina Duffy said protesters were careful not to voice opinions about the conflict between the Venezuelan government and the opposition but were prepared to criticize “whatever government exists” on environmental issues. She said economic hardship had compelled many Venezuelans to consume and waste less, making them more aware of the need to conserve.

“Of course, there’s still a lot to do,” she said.

Her daughter, 7-year-old Victoria Duffy, showed up with a picture of Earth.

“You can make a difference,” the poster read.

Venezuelan demonstrators are concerned about the degradation of the El Ávila national park that borders Caracas and whose mountain springs were a key source of water for desperate residents during recent nationwide blackouts.

Dannalice Anza, a 19-year-old student who went to the protest with her twin sister Dayalice, said the key to conservation was to think globally “beyond the problems in Venezuela.”

Demonstrations were also planned in Mexico.

Source: Fox News World

Climate change activists in Latin America rallied for action on global warming Friday, heeding a call by Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg to hold demonstrations across the world.

In Rio de Janeiro, a small group of students gathered outside the state legislature to deliver a letter dated from the future in which they lamented Brazil’s loss of coastline, rainforests and species.

“We, the Brazilians of the future, are also asking you: is there anything more important than protecting life and ensuring a quality future for the next generations? No, there is not,” they wrote.

In more than a dozen other cities throughout the country, youth also staged strikes and took to the streets, using the issue to challenge the environmental policies of the far-right government of President Jair Bolsonaro.

Bolsonaro says excessive regulation has hindered economic development and has moved to strip the environment ministry’s authority over water and forestry services.

Last week, his environment minister questioned the effectiveness of the Amazon Fund created to contain deforestation. The minister has also called climate change a “secondary issue” and said that agribusiness in Brazil is “under threat.”

Meanwhile, in the Venezuelan capital of Caracas, a few dozen protesters explicitly abstained from commenting on politics amid a monthslong standoff between President Nicolás Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaidó.

Andreina Duffy said protesters were careful not to voice opinions about the conflict between the Venezuelan government and the opposition but were prepared to criticize “whatever government exists” on environmental issues. She said economic hardship had compelled many Venezuelans to consume and waste less, making them more aware of the need to conserve.

“Of course, there’s still a lot to do,” she said.

Her daughter, 7-year-old Victoria Duffy, showed up with a picture of Earth.

“You can make a difference,” the poster read.

Venezuelan demonstrators are concerned about the degradation of the El Ávila national park that borders Caracas and whose mountain springs were a key source of water for desperate residents during recent nationwide blackouts.

Dannalice Anza, a 19-year-old student who went to the protest with her twin sister Dayalice, said the key to conservation was to think globally “beyond the problems in Venezuela.”

Demonstrations were also planned in Mexico.

Source: Fox News World

An American climber who fulfilled his dream of climbing the highest mountains on each of the seven continents by reaching the summit of Mount Everest died of probable altitude sickness on the way down, mountaineering officials said Friday.

Don Cash became ill at the summit and was treated there by his two Sherpa guides, one of the officials said.

“He got high altitude sickness on top of Everest,” said Pasang Tenje Sherpa, head of Pioneer Adventure, which provided the guides.

“When he was on the top he just fell. The two Sherpas who were with him gave CPR and massages,” he said. “After that he woke up, then near Hillary Step he fell down again in the same manner, which means he got high altitude sickness.”

Hillary Step is a rocky outcrop near the summit named after Sir Edmund Hillary, who was the first person to climb the mountain along with the Sherpa Tenzing Norgay in 1953.

Altitude sickness is caused by low amounts of oxygen at high elevation and can cause headaches, vomiting, shortness of breath and mental confusion.

Cash, 55, from Utah, had a long-held dream to climb the “seven summits,” the highest mountains on the seven continents, his daughter Danielle Cook posted on Facebook on Wednesday.

Santa Bir Lama, the president of the Nepal Mountaineering Association, said Cash’s body was still near Hillary Step.

“Many others who are at the summit are still there. When the Sherpas come down, then they can bring his body down,” he said.

Pasang Tenje Sherpa said Cash’s brother had sent him a message thanking the Sherpa guides, Norbo and Tenzin, for their help.

“Please tell Norbo and Tenzin our family’s deep appreciation for their heroic effort to save Don,” he quoted the message as saying. “Give them our love and prayers, and we are glad they are safe.”

Before he headed for the summit, Cash texted his son Tanner that he felt “so blessed to be on the mountain that I read about for the last 40 years.”

Cash said on his LinkedIn page that he left his job as a sales executive to try to join the seven summits club. In January, he wrote, he climbed Mount Vinson Masif, Antarctica’s tallest peak.

Cash is survived by his wife Monette and their four children, the Salt Lake Tribune reported.

Source: Fox News World

In a small farmhouse surrounded by cloud forest, Iván Lozano inspects dozens of glass containers that hold some of the world’s most coveted frogs.

The conservationist has been fighting the illegal trade in rare tropical frogs for years, risking his life and his checkbook to save the brightly colored, poisonous amphibians whose population in the wild is dwindling.

But Lozano doesn’t hunt down poachers and smugglers. He’s trying to undermine them by breeding exotic frogs legally and selling them at lower prices than specimens plucked by traffickers from Colombia’s jungles. His frog-breeding center, Treasures of Colombia, is among a handful of conservation programs trying to curtail the trafficking of wild animals by providing enthusiasts with a more eco-friendly alternative: specimens bred in captivity.

Follow Manuel Rueda on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ruedareport

Source: Fox News World

Scientists say they have observed wild chimpanzees tucking into an unusual snack: tortoises, whose hard shells they cracked against tree trunks before scooping out the meat.

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the University of Osnabrueck said Thursday they spotted the behavior dozens of times in a group of chimpanzees at Loango National Park in Gabon.

It is the first time chimpanzees have been observed eating tortoises, with weaker animals often passing their prey to stronger adults who would break them open and share the meal.

Researchers said one male even ate half the tortoise, then tucked it into a tree fork and came back the next day to finish the leftovers, suggesting chimpanzees are capable of planning ahead.

Source: Fox News World

Scientists say they have observed wild chimpanzees tucking into an unusual snack: tortoises, whose hard shells they cracked against tree trunks before scooping out the meat.

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the University of Osnabrueck said Thursday they spotted the behavior dozens of times in a group of chimpanzees at Loango National Park in Gabon.

It is the first time chimpanzees have been observed eating tortoises, with weaker animals often passing their prey to stronger adults who would break them open and share the meal.

Researchers said one male even ate half the tortoise, then tucked it into a tree fork and came back the next day to finish the leftovers, suggesting chimpanzees are capable of planning ahead.

Source: Fox News World


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