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British police said Friday an elderly man fixing his home’s satellite dish in an “idyllic and remote” location in Wales was shot with a crossbow in a seemingly unprovoked attack.

North Wales police were called to the 74-year-old victim’s home in Holyhead around 12:30 a.m. He was critically injured. His assailant’s identity and motive remain a mystery.

SURVEILLANCE FOOTAGE SHOWS FAKE DELIVERY MAN WHO SHOT WOMAN WITH CROSSBOW

“This elderly member of our community has received horrendous, life-changing injuries as a result of this incident its motive for which remains completely unknown,” Detective Chief Inspector Brian Kearney said.

The man was struck when he went outside to fix the satellite dish, Kearney said.

An ambulance took him to the hospital where he was in critical condition.

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“North-west Wales and Anglesey remains one of the safest parts of the U.K.,” the BBC quoted Kearney as saying. “Incidents of this nature are extremely rare and we and determined to find out who has done this.”

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Hundreds of thousands of bees that lived on the roof of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris have survived the devastating fire that erupted earlier this week, French beekeepers confirmed.

The approximately 180,000 bees were apparently intoxicated by the smoke of the flames, Notre Dame beekeeper Nicolas Geant told The Associated Press Friday.

“It’s a big day. I am so relieved,” he said. “I saw satellite photos that showed the three hives didn’t burn.”

NOTRE DAME FIRE LIKELY CAUSED BY ELECTRICAL SHORT-CIRCUIT, INVESTIGATORS BELIEVE

“Instead of killing them, the CO2 (from smoke) makes them drunk, puts them to sleep,” he explained.

Beeopic, a Paris-based urban beekeeping company, posted about the surviving bees on its Instagram page Thursday.

“Our bees at Notre Dame Cathedral are still alive,” the post said in French. “Confirmation from the site managers!! Our Lady’s bees are still alive!”

The day before, the company had posted a satellite picture of the hives that were still intact on the sacristy roof but said the fate of the bees was unknown at the time.

The three beehives were installed in 2013 on the roof of the sacristy at the south end of the cathedral. The sacristy, which is made of stone, sits lower than the cathedral’s main roof — made of wood — which burned and collapsed along with the spire during the fire on Monday.

Even though smoke is harmless to bees — and is often used by beekeepers to sedate the colony to access their hives — excessive heat can kill them by melting the wax that protects the hives. European bees, unlike some other species, stay with their colony in times of danger.

NOTRE DAME WORSHIPERS COULD PRAY IN ‘EPHEMERAL CATHEDRAL’ MADE OF WOOD; SATELLITE IMAGES SHOW SCOPE OF DAMAGE

“When bees sense fire, they gorge themselves on honey and stay to protect their queen, who doesn’t move,” Geant explained.

“I saw how big the flames were, so I immediately thought it was going to kill the bees. Even though they were 30 meters [nearly 100 feet] lower than the top roof, the wax in the hives melts at 63 degrees Celsius [145.4 Fahrenheit],” he added.

However, when Notre Dame officials got to the roof, they found the bees buzzing in and out of their hives.

“I wouldn’t call it a miracle, but I’m very, very happy,” Geant said.

The hives, which produce about 165 pounds of honey every year, were added to the sacristy as part of a Paris-wide initiative to boost declining bee numbers. Hives were also introduced above Paris’ gilded Opera.

Investigators in Paris said Thursday they believe an electrical short-circuit is most likely the cause behind the massive fire at the cathedral, though an investigation is ongoing.

Fox News’ Barnini Chakraborty and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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One of the most-powerful leaders in the United Arab Emirates has found himself entangled in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian interference in America’s 2016 election.

Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, believed to be the Emirates’ day-to-day ruler, is the only world leader included in Mueller’s cast-of-characters index near the end of the 448-page report.

His inclusion, stemming from his mysterious role in a 2017 meeting between a Trump associate and a Russian middleman for Vladimir Putin in the Seychelles, stands out against otherwise-glancing references to the wider Mideast.

But left unsaid — or possibly redacted — is what motivated the UAE to insert itself as a middleman in contacts between Trump’s campaign and Russia.

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Thousands are gathering in Belgrade for a mass rally in support of Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic, who is seeking to counter months of protests demanding more democratic freedoms in the Balkan country.

Authorities have sealed off central streets in the capital Friday as Vucic’s supporters arrive in buses from all over the country, neighboring Bosnia and Kosovo. In live broadcasts, the dominant pro-government media are lambasting opposition officials as “fascist and thieves.”

Vucic has promised a “carnival atmosphere” at the rally he describes as Serbia’s biggest in decades.

Anti-government demonstrators have been demanding free and fair elections and more media freedoms and have accused the president of autocratic tendencies.

Vucic formally advocates joining the European Union, but has remained pro-Russian since his ultranationalist past.

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Members of France’s “Yellow Vest” movement claim the image of unbroken unity that arose in the aftermath of the inferno at Notre Dame Cathedral – and the $1 billion in donations that rolled in to help rebuild it – is being exploited by French President Emmanuel Macron, and vow to be out in full force this weekend protesting social and economic injustice in the country.

“Can you imagine, 100 million, 200 million in one click!” Philippe Martinez, the head of the militant CGT labor union, told The New York Times. “It really shows the inequalities in this country.”

The spectacle of rival billionaires publicly pledging hundreds of millions of dollars to help restore the famed cathedral quickly festered into resentment for some.

NOTRE DAME CATHEDRAL KEPT STANDING AMID FIRE WITH GIANT ROBOT ‘COLOSSUS’

“You’re there, looking at all these millions accumulating, after spending five months in the streets fighting social and fiscal injustice,” Ingrid Levavasseur, a founding leader of the movement, told The Associated Press. “It’s breaking my heart.”

She added, “What happened at Notre Dame is obviously a deplorable tragedy. But nobody died. I’ve heard someone speaking of national mourning. Are they out of their minds?”

The blaze that broke out at Notre Dame Monday captured the world’s attention and sent a shockwave through France, prompting Macon to vow to rebuild the cathedral in five years in a televised address to the nation.

MACRON VOWS TO REBUILD NOTRE DAME IN 5 YEARS, AS DRAMATIC FOOTAGE OF FIREFIGHTERS IS RELEASED

“It took him less than 24 hours to speak about the fire, while he made us wait for three weeks before addressing our issues,” Levavasseur said.

With Notre Dame cathedral in background, religious officials carry the cross during the Good Friday procession, Friday, April 19, 2019 in Paris.

With Notre Dame cathedral in background, religious officials carry the cross during the Good Friday procession, Friday, April 19, 2019 in Paris. (AP)

Decrying the struggles of low-paid workers and pensioners and accusing Macron’s government of favoring the rich, Yellow Vest activists — named after the fluorescent jackets French motorists are required to keep in their cars — have been protesting for 22 consecutive weekends.

Frustrated by the lack of government response, Levavasseur has stopped attending demonstrations in recent weeks but told The Associated Press she’s considering protesting on Saturday because of an even greater sense of being ignored since the Notre Dame tragedy.

And she’s not the only one feeling this way.

Yellow Vest protesters gather at the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, Saturday, March 9, 2019. French Yellow Vests protested for a 17th straight weekend in Paris and other cities against the government's economic policies they see as favoring the rich.

Yellow Vest protesters gather at the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, Saturday, March 9, 2019. French Yellow Vests protested for a 17th straight weekend in Paris and other cities against the government’s economic policies they see as favoring the rich. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

“The Yellow Vests will show their anger against the billion found in four days for stone, and nothing for the needy,” wrote Pierre Derrien on the Facebook page of a Yellow Vests group based in Montpellier.

More than $1 billion has been pledged for the cathedral’s restoration, and many French citizens believe the money could be better spent elsewhere. Some have also criticized the billionaires’ donations because their pledges make them eligible for huge tax deductions. The Pinault family has said, however, they will not ask for a tax deduction for their donation to Notre Dame.

FRANCE’S YELLOW VESTS CLASHES WITH RIOT POLICE IN PARIS, WATER CANNON AND TEAR GAS DEPLOYED WITH AT LEAST 20 ARRESTED

In fact, taxes have been one of the most pressing issues of the Yellow Vest movement, which has lashed out at Macron for favoring the rich by eliminating a wealth tax as part of his economic stimulus plan, while average French workers have seen their living standards decline.

Anti-rich messages have flourished on social media in recent days as Yellow Vest protesters coordinated their action for the weekend.

“A little message for all the patrons (Pinault, Arnault and the others), hospitals are on strike because they lack means, so if you can make a gesture…” a Facebook user wrote.

Meanwhile, dozens of others exhorted wealthy donors to be more generous with France’s underclass.

“Victor Hugo thanks all the generous donors ready to save Notre Dame and proposes that they do the same thing with Les Miserables,” they wrote on their social media pages, quoting French writer Ollivier Pourriol and his droll reference to Hugo’s famous novels about the cathedral and the lives of the poor.

Tristan, a Yellow Vest supporter who declined to give his full name for fear of being identified by police after he was banned from traveling to Paris during weekends to attend demonstrations, prefers to stay away from the polemics.

MACRON’S VOW TO REBUILD NOTRE DAME CATHEDRAL WITHIN 5 YEARS UNREALISTIC, SOME EXPERTS SAY

He made a $90 donation to Notre Dame —  a lot of money for the 29-year-old, who works in construction. “I’m a Catholic, I’m a regular churchgoer, and I felt personally touched. Tears came to my eyes on Monday night.”

He added what shocked him the most was Macron saying the cathedral would be rebuilt in five years.

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“It’s obvious he never held a trowel in his life,” Tristan quipped.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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Hunkered down in their hives and drunk on smoke, Notre Dame’s smallest official residents — some 180,000 bees — somehow managed to survive the inferno that consumed the cathedral’s ancient wooden roof.

Confounding officials who thought they had perished, the bees clung to life, protecting their queen.

“It’s a big day. I am so relieved. I saw satellite photos that showed the three hives didn’t burn,” Notre Dame beekeeper Nicolas Geant told The Associated Press on Friday.

“Instead of killing them, the CO2 (from smoke) makes them drunk, puts them to sleep,” he explained.

Geant has overseen the bees since 2013, when three hives were installed on the roof of the stone sacristy that joins the south end of the monument. The move was part of a Paris-wide initiative to boost declining bee numbers. Hives were also introduced above Paris’ gilded Opera.

The cathedral’s hives were lower than Notre Dame’s main roof and the 19th-century spire that burned and collapsed during Monday evening’s fire.

Since bees don’t have lungs, they can’t die from smoke inhalation — but they can die from excessive heat. European bees, unlike some bee species elsewhere, don’t abandon their hives when facing danger.

“When bees sense fire, they gorge themselves on honey and stay to protect their queen, who doesn’t move,” Geant said. “I saw how big the flames were, so I immediately thought it was going to kill the bees. Even though they were 30 meters (nearly 100 feet) lower than the top roof, the wax in the hives melts at 63 degrees Celsius (145.4 Fahrenheit).”

If the wax that protects their hive melts, the bees simply die inside, Geant explained.

Smoke, on the other hand, is innocuous. Beekeepers regularly smoke out the hives to sedate the colony whenever they need access inside. The hives produce around 75 kilograms (165 pounds) of honey annually, which is sold to Notre Dame employees.

Notre Dame officials saw the bees on top of the sacristy Friday, buzzing in and out of their hives.

“I wouldn’t call it a miracle, but I’m very, very happy,” Geant added.

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The first round of presidential elections in North Macedonia on Sunday is seen as a key test for the center-left government’s survival in a society deeply divided by the country’s name change to end a decades-old dispute with neighboring Greece.

The name change from just “Macedonia,” which paves the way for the country to join NATO and the European Union, has been the main campaign issue, with one of the two front-runners vowing to challenge the agreement in the International Court of Justice in The Hague.

Three university law professors, including one from the country’s ethnic Albanian minority, are vying for the largely ceremonial post.

Skopje and Athens struck a deal last June for the former Yugoslav republic to change its name in exchange for Greece dropping its objections to the country joining NATO. The neighbors have been at odds over the issue since the country’s independence in the early 1990s— Greece said use of the term “Macedonia” implied territorial aspirations on its own northern province of the same name and usurped its cultural and ancient heritage.

The deal has faced vociferous opposition in both countries, with critics accusing their respective governments of conceding too much.

Outgoing President Gjorge Ivanov, whose second and final five-year term ends on May 12, had tried to derail or delay the deal with Greece.

His opposition is echoed by Conservative VMRO-DPMNE party candidate Gordana Siljanovska Davkova, 63, who is the first woman to run for president in the country. She has argued the name change was a “painful and unconstitutional” move that did not enjoy popular support. She says the agreement with Greece has no legitimacy as a September referendum that approved it failed to produce a big enough turnout to be valid.

“Our victory would mean the defeat of (the government’s) anti-Macedonian and anti-national policies,” Siljanovska said.

Her rival, 56-year-old center-left Stevo Pendarovski, has fiercely defended the name change. Pendarovski, who was defeated by Ivanov in 2014 elections, is being supported by the governing social democrats and their junior government coalition partner, the ethnic Albanian Democratic Union for Integration.

“We have managed to throw the clutches of the (previous conservative) regime and now we are following the path of integration, economic development and overall social progress,” Pendarovski said at a rally in the capital Skopje last weekend.

“We are now recognized as serious partner by the democratic world.”

Blerim Reka, a candidate for two small ethnic Albanian opposition parties who is campaigning mainly in minority areas, also supports the name change for the NATO and EU accession prospects it opens up.

Recent opinion polls indicate Pendarovski is slightly ahead of Siljanovska. A survey by the Institute for Democracy Societas Civils put Pendarovski at 27.2% support, ahead of Siljanovska with 23.5% with Blerim Reka on 11%. It put the margin of error at 3.1%.

A candidate needs 50% plus one vote of the 1.8 million registered voters to win outright in the first round, which is considered highly unlikely. A runoff has been set for May 5.

The State Electoral Commission has said more than 3,000 domestic and about 420 international observers will monitor the election.

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A French court cleared of defamation charges six women who accused a former French lawmaker of sexual misconduct and the journalists who reported the allegations.

The court ordered Friday the former lawmaker, Denis Baupin, to pay 1,000 euros ($1,120) in damages to each of the 12 persons he sued.

In May 2016, investigative website Mediapart and radio station France Inter published and broadcast accounts from 14 women who alleged Baupin had groped, sexted and otherwise harassed them.

The prominent Green Party member then resigned as vice president of the lower House of Parliament. He denied wrongdoing and launched a defamation lawsuit against the six women who were identified in the reports, some witnesses and journalists.

The case had been under particular scrutiny in the wake of the #MeToo movement.

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German weekly Der Spiegel says the Tunisian man who carried out a deadly truck attack on a Berlin Christmas market in 2016 was part of a Europe-wide network of Islamic extremists.

Spiegel reported Friday that Anis Amri , who died in a shootout with Italian police days after the rampage, had contacts to Islamic State supporters including extremists tied to the 2015 attacks in Paris.

It cited documents from the German Federal Prosecutors Office and federal police drawing on recordings made of prison conversations involving Frenchman Clement Baur, who was arrested in 2017 for planning an attack during the country’s presidential election.

According to the report, Baur said Amri was part of a plan to stage simultaneous attacks in Europe and that he was fascinated by the 2016 Nice truck attack.

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Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg has told a rally of several thousand young people in Rome’s Piazza del Popolo they should aim that when they are older they can say they did everything they could to help the climate.

While the rally was part of the Friday school strike-for-climate movement, Italian classrooms were already shut for Easter vacation.

Thunberg told reporters: “I don’t enjoy attention but I enjoy making a difference.”

Since she doesn’t fly to help the environment, the Swedish 16-year-old, asked what she’d do if she went to Washington or to U.N. headquarters in New York, said: “I guess I would have to take a boat.”

On Wednesday, Thunberg chatted briefly with Pope Francis in St. Peter’s Square. She said Francis, who champions environmental protection, was “very kind, encouraging” to her.

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