Greg Norman

A “seat of the pants flying” maneuver that many would consider too close for comfort is just another part of the routine for the Geico Skytypers.

Larry Arken, the air show team’s commanding officer, has his eyes fixated on a Douglas C-47 to his left, only about 50 feet away from the cockpit of his restored World War II-era aircraft. And even closer to his right, pilot Tom Daly – flying in one of three other North American SNJ-2s alongside Arken — is bobbing up and down as he remains locked in formation.

Together, the five planes – occupying a crowded space less than the size of a football field – majestically roar past the Statue of Liberty and make repeated turns in New York Harbor to commemorate the upcoming Memorial Day and 75th anniversary of D-Day.

“What a better place than that to celebrate our freedom,” Arken said on Thursday about an hour before the special moment, which Fox News was given a backseat ride in his plane for. He made note of the symbolic presence of the Douglas C-47 provided by the American Airpower Museum – a military transport plane used to drop American paratroopers into Normandy on D-Day.

The Geico Skytypers and a Douglas C-47 military transport plane fly by the Statue of Liberty Thursday.

The Geico Skytypers and a Douglas C-47 military transport plane fly by the Statue of Liberty Thursday.

The two upcoming dates paying tribute to America’s brave men and servicewomen hold special meaning to the pilots of the Skytypers. Many of them have honed their aviation skills from decades of experience flying missions in the Navy and Air Force. Others come from families whose members have fought in America’s greatest conflicts.

FLAGS HONOR AMERICAN HEROES AT AIR FORCE ACADEMY CEMETERY

Daly, a pilot who participated in the Statue of Liberty fly-by Thursday with Arken, Chris Orr and Mike Brockey, says his father was a turret gunner on a Douglas A-20 Havoc during World War II, ending up in New Guinea and Okinawa. His two brothers fought in the Vietnam War – one as a Green Beret with the famed 5th Special Forces Group.

Daly spent three decades flying with New York’s Nassau County Police Department before joining the Skytypers and says holidays like Memorial Day offer him a chance to celebrate freedom and pay respects America’s fallen heroes.

“A lot of people don’t realize the sacrifices that have been made by families,” he said. “As the Geico Skytypers, we visit air shows all over the country and we meet these people and I think that the world needs to know the sacrifices they make. Their families split apart so that they can lead this country, defend our country overseas and defending other people overseas as well.”

During a symbolic flight hosted by the American Airpower Museum on Long Island, the Skytypers flew by the Statue of Liberty alongside a Douglas C-47 -- a military transport aircraft used to deploy paratroopers during D-Day.

During a symbolic flight hosted by the American Airpower Museum on Long Island, the Skytypers flew by the Statue of Liberty alongside a Douglas C-47 — a military transport aircraft used to deploy paratroopers during D-Day. (Alex Quiles/Fox News)

The Skytypers fly vintage SNJ-2 planes, now restored and updated with some modifications after originally being used to train Allied pilots during World War II.

“They were the forerunner to pilots that had to get into our frontline fighters and the C-47s, and the B-25s. They flew these airplanes as advanced trainers,” Arken said. “They did aerobatics. They did gunnery training on it and they flew these airplanes actually off of aircraft carriers back then.”

Getting the opportunity to ride in the back seat of one is best described as a raw and exhilarating experience.

From the moment the plane’s 550-horsepower engine fires up, the smell of fuel fills the air and strong gusts of wind generated by its propeller start swerving in and out of its partially-open canopy.

The SNJ-2's open-air canopy provides for an exhilarating flight experience.

The SNJ-2’s open-air canopy provides for an exhilarating flight experience. (Alex Quiles/ Fox News)

Once up in the sky, the pilots use delicate, subtle movements to keep the planes in formation. They rarely shift their vision away from other teammates and fly as close as 30 feet apart.

All this happens as the world inches away from your helmet, in the opened and completely exposed parts of the SNJ-2’s canopy, races by at speeds of more than 150 mph.

The Geico Skytypers fly a restored SNJ-2 plane -- also called a T-6 Texan by the Army Air Corps -- that originally was produced to train Allied pilots during World War II. Each plane is equipped with a system that can release streams of smoke to 'type' messages in the sky.

The Geico Skytypers fly a restored SNJ-2 plane — also called a T-6 Texan by the Army Air Corps — that originally was produced to train Allied pilots during World War II. Each plane is equipped with a system that can release streams of smoke to ‘type’ messages in the sky. (Alex Quiles/Fox News)

Orr, a former F-14 Tomcat pilot who completed 35 combat missions in Iraq, says the road to becoming a Skytyper takes years of training.

“You study. You know every single thing that you are going to do – every single radio call, where to look for everybody,” he told Fox News.

Prior to the shows, Orr says the six members of the team that are performing will spread out on concrete and walk around, pretending they are running through the 18-minute routine. The lead plane is equipped with a tablet that will send software signals to the other planes to release streams of smoke, allowing them to display messages in the air.

The upcoming holiday of Memorial Day and the 75th anniversary of D-Day hold special meaning to the Skytypers, as many of them have military backgrounds with family members who have served in combat.

The upcoming holiday of Memorial Day and the 75th anniversary of D-Day hold special meaning to the Skytypers, as many of them have military backgrounds with family members who have served in combat. (Alex Quiles/ Fox News)

But at the end of the day, Orr says, “it’s still seat of the pants flying.”

“This is just the greatest plane. It’s got this big, old radial motor,” he said. “You fly with the canopy back… you land and can’t see anything in front of you because the motor’s so big.”

The Geico Skytypers – based in New York’s Long Island — are set to perform this Memorial Day weekend at the Bethpage Air Show in Jones Beach, before heading to Tennessee and Ohio in June.

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The Geico Skytypers perform air shows across America. (Alex Quiles/Fox News)

The Geico Skytypers perform air shows across America. (Alex Quiles/Fox News)

Arken says the team loves “the ability to be able to show off these World War II airplanes to the people.

“And we love to inspire kids because they watch aviation and hopefully they decide to do a path in aviation,” he added.

Fox News’ Alex Quiles contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

A 20-year-old Phoenix man accused of being in the U.S. illegally is now facing charges for allegedly impregnating an 11-year-old girl.

Carlos Jacinto Cobo-Perez, whom police say is an illegal immigrant, was arrested last week, FOX10 reported. The same day Cobo-Perez was taken into custody, the 11-year-old girl was taken to Phoenix Children’s Hospital and doctors determined she was pregnant. Investigators told FOX10 that Cobo-Perez admitted having sex with the girl in his car near her school, and said she told him he was the person who got her pregnant.

“He kept insisting. She’s an 11-year-old girl. He’s 20. Almost 21. But he said he already knew what he wanted,” a man who identified himself as the girl’s stepfather told AZFamily.com. “He got in her head, and she fell for it easily.”

Police began looking into Cobo-Perez in November 2018 after the girl’s mother raised concerns the pair was in a relationship.

Carlos Jacinto Cobo-Perez has been charged with aggravated assault and sexual conduct with a minor.

Carlos Jacinto Cobo-Perez has been charged with aggravated assault and sexual conduct with a minor. (MCSO)

ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT SENTENCED TO 20 YEARS FOR RAPING 12-YEAR-OLD MISSISSIPPI GIRL

When investigators interviewed Cobo-Perez the following month, he allegedly told them he knew the girl’s age, he knew the relationship was wrong and he planned to cut off contact with her, FOX10 reported.

Court papers viewed by the station, however, say the girl’s parents found a letter from Cobo-Perez in which he allegedly said he knew he could go to jail for being in a relationship with someone underage, but he reportedly wasn’t bothered by the risk.

Following his arrest last week, Cobo-Perez was charged with aggravated assault and sexual conduct with a minor and is being held in jail on a $150,000 bond.

“I was working, and I wanted to leave work and destroy him, to be honest,” the girl’s stepfather told AZFamily.com after learning about her pregnancy.

The family told ABC15 that they intend to support their daughter, but want Cobo-Perez – who asked a judge during a recent court appearance if he could sign an order of deportation – to stay in custody.

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“He needs to pay for what he did,” a woman who identified herself as the girl’s mother told the station. “If they let him out and send him back, he’ll be able to come back pretty easily.”

Cobo-Perez is set to appear in court again May 28.

Source: Fox News National

A New Jersey police officer could spend the rest of his life behind bars after being charged with shooting and killing a driver and wounding a passenger during a wild chase that was all caught on video.

Jovanny Crespo of the Newark Police Department was indicted by a grand jury Tuesday on six counts related to the late January death of Gregory Griffin, the Essex County Prosecutor’s Office said. The announcement coincided with the release of a dramatic bodycam video of the fatal police pursuit, showing the 26-year-old officer firing off numerous rounds into the car Griffin was driving.

“It is the state’s position that this officer’s conduct that night was criminal,” acting Essex County Prosecutor Theodore Stephens said. “He showed a reckless disregard for human life by shooting into a moving vehicle, a vehicle which had heavily tinted windows. This is the first fatal police-involved shooting to result in an indictment in Essex County in recent memory.”

VIDEO SHOWS DEADLY CONNECTICUT POLICE SHOOTING AFTER OFFICER YELLS ‘SHOW ME YOUR HANDS’

Investigators say the Jan. 28 incident began after a female Newark police officer pulled over Griffin’s car in a traffic stop. They say he sped off and the officer “radioed… that she saw a gun,” which “led to a pursuit involving a number of police cars.”

Crespo’s bodycam footage starts with him riding in the passenger seat of a police cruiser, repeatedly demanding the driver to “cut in front” of Griffin’s black car.

Crespo then hops out as Griffin pulls into an intersection, firing off several rounds at the vehicle while saying “get out of the car”. But Griffin takes off again and Crespo re-enters the police cruiser, and is heard breathing heavily as his driver revs the engine in pursuit.

“I shot at him, bro,” Crespo says to the driver. He then resumes giving instructions to the driver, who tells him to “relax”. At one point, the now-agitated driver yells at Crespo to stay inside the car as he tries to open his passenger door and engage Griffin a second time.

Newark Police Officer Jovanny Crespo could be sentenced to life in prison for his alleged role in a police-involved shooting in January, prosecutors say.

Newark Police Officer Jovanny Crespo could be sentenced to life in prison for his alleged role in a police-involved shooting in January, prosecutors say. (Essex County Prosecutor’s Office)

Yet at another intersection, Crespo appears to ignore the driver’s command. The footage shows him jumping out of the car and firing off more rounds at Griffin’s vehicle, which once again speeds off.

“Bro, he pointed the gun right at me,” Crespo tells the driver after getting back inside his police car.

TEXAS POLICE OFFICER SEEN SHOOTING MAN WHO WAS STABBING WOMAN TO DEATH

The chase ends with Crespo leaving his police cruiser a third time to approach Griffin, now stopped in the middle of a street.

“Stop the car!” Crespo is heard saying as Griffin’s vehicle – with its passenger door slightly open – begins moving again. Crespo fires off multiple rounds at the car and other officers swarm it, pulling out 35-year-old passenger Andrew Dixon, who sustained serious injuries. Griffin, behind the wheel, remained motionless.

The Essex County Prosecutor’s Office says both men were shot in the head during the pursuit and Griffin, 46, died at a hospital the following day. No officers were injured during the incident and Crespo was the only one to discharge his weapon, they added.

In the bodycam footage, Crespo is heard telling his colleagues “I shot him in the head” and “I shot both of them.”

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The New Jersey Attorney General’s use of force policy states that officers are only allowed to use deadly force to prevent the escape of a fleeing suspect if it is determined that the suspect “will pose an imminent danger of death of serious bodily harm should the escape succeed.” The policy also says officers can only use deadly force in those conditions if it “presents no substantial risk of injury to innocent persons.”

Crespo was taken into custody Tuesday being charged with aggravated manslaughter, aggravated assault, two counts of Possession of Weapon for an Unlawful Purpose and two counts of Official Misconduct – and faces life in prison if convicted on all counts. He has been suspended without pay and is expected to make his first court appearance Wednesday or Thursday.

Source: Fox News National

The looming early release of the Islamic militant who became known as the infamous “American Taliban” member is “absolutely outrageous” and he “should be in prison for life,” a House lawmaker and former U.S Army Green Beret said Wednesday.

Rep. Michael Waltz, R-Fla., made the comments on “Fox & Friends” a day before John Walker Lindh is expected to emerge from a federal prison in Indiana. Waltz, who also served as a counterterrorism adviser to Vice President Dick Cheney, says “it’s bad enough that [Lindh] was only given 20 years” after being found guilty of joining and supporting the Taliban.

“He shouldn’t be on parole at all,” Waltz told ‘Fox & Friends’. “He should be in prison for life, he’s a traitor.”

Lindh, who is currently behind bars in Terre Haute, Indiana, is set to be discharged Thursday, several years before he would complete the prescribed 20-year prison sentence. The former Islamist fighter and enemy combatant, named “Detainee 001 in the war on terror,” was arrested in 2001, just months after the Sept. 11 attacks and the start of the war in Afghanistan, along with a group of Taliban fighters who were captured by U.S. forces.

Johnny "Mike" Spann with daughter Alison, who was the first American killed in the Afghanistan war soon after interviewing "American Taliban" John Walker Lindh.

Johnny “Mike” Spann with daughter Alison, who was the first American killed in the Afghanistan war soon after interviewing “American Taliban” John Walker Lindh. (Spann family/AP)

JOHN WALKER LINDH, AMERICAN EX-TALIBAN MILITANT, SET TO WALK FREE THURSDAY

Lindh also has been blamed for playing a role in the death of Johnny “Mike” Spann, a U.S Marine turned CIA paramilitary operative who became the first American to be killed in combat in Afghanistan amid the aftermath of 9/11.

“I recently received a letter from his daughter Allison that was just heartbreaking,” Waltz said Wednesday. “It said: ‘I feel his early release is a slap in the face to my family, every person killed on September 11, the military, the intelligence services and millions of Muslims who don’t embrace extremism’”.

Sentencing reports have indicated that “good behavior” may serve as justification for Lindh’s early release.

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But under a judge’s order, Lindh, when he leaves lockup, will need permission to obtain Internet-connected devices, will not be allowed to talk online in any language but English and will be barred from having a passport, among other restrictions.

“We’re calling on the Federal Bureau of Prisons to explain why he is being released early, and then we are calling on law enforcement authorities to be watching him extremely closely,” Waltz said. “We need to keep a close eye on him.”

Fox News’ Hollie McKay contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

The Islamic militant who became known as the infamous  “American Taliban” member is set to be released from a U.S. federal prison Thursday despite lawmakers’ concerns about the “security and safety implications” of freeing an unrepentant terrorist who officials say continues to “openly call for extremist violence.”

John Walker Lindh, who is currently behind bars in Terra Haute, Indiana, is set to be discharged May 23, several years before he would complete the prescribed 20-year prison sentence he received for joining and supporting the Taliban. The former Islamist fighter and enemy combatant, named “Detainee 001 in the war on terror,” was arrested in 2001, just months after the Sept. 11 attacks and the start of the war in Afghanistan, along with a group of Taliban fighters who were captured by U.S. forces.

“We must consider the security and safety implications for our citizens and communities who will receive individuals like John Walker Lindh, who continue to openly call for extremist violence,” Sens. Richard C. Shelby, R-Ala., and Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., wrote in a letter to the Federal Bureau of Prisons late last week that was obtained by the Washington Post.

In the letter, the lawmakers reportedly sought details on how the agency is working to prevent prisoners such as Lindh from committing additional crimes after their release. They also asked which other “terrorist offenders” are next in line to be freed and how the Federal Bureau of Prisons determines whether or not someone is an “ongoing public threat.”

Johnny "Mike" Spann with daughter Alison, who was the first American killed in the Afghanistan war soon after interviewing "American Taliban" John Walker Lindh.

Johnny “Mike” Spann with daughter Alison, who was the first American killed in the Afghanistan war soon after interviewing “American Taliban” John Walker Lindh. (Spann family/AP)

DAUGHTER OF AMERICAN KILLED AFTER SPEAKING WITH LINDH SLAMS UPCOMING EARLY RELEASE

Lindh has been blamed for playing a role in the death of Johnny “Mike” Spann, a U.S Marine turned CIA paramilitary operative who became the first American to be killed in combat in Afghanistan, amid the aftermath of the September 11 attacks. Spann’s daughter, Allison, told Fox News in March that Lindh’s early release “feels like such a slap in the face.”

In November 2001, U.S forces learned that an American – Lindh – was among the cluster of Taliban fighters left in limbo after their leader surrendered to the Northern Alliance in the northern Afghanistan province of Mazar-i-Sharif. Spann was the first to go into a compound there, serving as a prison, to interview Lindh, peppering him with questions about where he was from and what he was doing. But Lindh refused to respond.

“In those moments, when he chose to stay silent, he sealed his fate as a traitor to the United States,” Allison Spann said. “At any point, he could have warned him that something was being planned.”

Hours later, Lindh’s fellow detainees erupted in a violent revolt that left Mike Spann dead.

The initial charges leveled against the then 20-year-old Lindh in 2002 included one for murder conspiracy due to the role he played in the deadly prison rebellion.

However, nine of the ten counts in an indictment were then dropped and Lindh ended up pleading guilty to disobeying an executive order outlawing support to the Taliban and for possessing a weapon in Afghanistan.

LINDH IS SET TO BE RELEASED – SHOULD WE BE WORRIED?

Sentencing reports have indicated that “good behavior” may serve as justification for Lindh’s early release.

A convert to Islam hailing from northern California’s Marin County, Lindh made the journey to Afghanistan after journeying through Yemen and Pakistan as a 19-year-old shortly before the Sept. 11 attacks. He underwent training in Kandahar and met with Al Qaeda chief Usama bin Laden on at least one occasion.

In 2017, the National Counterterrorism Center, according to documents obtained by Foreign Policy, underscored that Lindh continued to “advocate for global jihad and write and translate violent extremist texts.”

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Furthermore, he is alleged to have told a TV producer last March that he would “continue to spread violent extremism Islam upon his release.”

When he leaves lockup, Lindh, according to court records viewed by the Washington Post, will need permission to obtain Internet-connected devices, will not be allowed to talk online in any language but English and will be barred from having a passport, among other restrictions.

Fox News’ Lukas Mikelionis contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

The Islamic militant who became known as the infamous  “American Taliban” member is set to be released from a U.S. federal prison Thursday despite lawmakers’ concerns about the “security and safety implications” of freeing an unrepentant terrorist who officials say continues to “openly call for extremist violence.”

John Walker Lindh, who is currently behind bars in Terra Haute, Indiana, is set to be discharged May 23, several years before he would complete the prescribed 20-year prison sentence he received for joining and supporting the Taliban. The former Islamist fighter and enemy combatant, named “Detainee 001 in the war on terror,” was arrested in 2001, just months after the Sept. 11 attacks and the start of the war in Afghanistan, along with a group of Taliban fighters who were captured by U.S. forces.

“We must consider the security and safety implications for our citizens and communities who will receive individuals like John Walker Lindh, who continue to openly call for extremist violence,” Sens. Richard C. Shelby, R-Ala., and Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., wrote in a letter to the Federal Bureau of Prisons late last week that was obtained by the Washington Post.

In the letter, the lawmakers reportedly sought details on how the agency is working to prevent prisoners such as Lindh from committing additional crimes after their release. They also asked which other “terrorist offenders” are next in line to be freed and how the Federal Bureau of Prisons determines whether or not someone is an “ongoing public threat.”

Johnny "Mike" Spann with daughter Alison, who was the first American killed in the Afghanistan war soon after interviewing "American Taliban" John Walker Lindh.

Johnny “Mike” Spann with daughter Alison, who was the first American killed in the Afghanistan war soon after interviewing “American Taliban” John Walker Lindh. (Spann family/AP)

DAUGHTER OF AMERICAN KILLED AFTER SPEAKING WITH LINDH SLAMS UPCOMING EARLY RELEASE

Lindh has been blamed for playing a role in the death of Johnny “Mike” Spann, a U.S Marine turned CIA paramilitary operative who became the first American to be killed in combat in Afghanistan, amid the aftermath of the September 11 attacks. Spann’s daughter, Allison, told Fox News in March that Lindh’s early release “feels like such a slap in the face.”

In November 2001, U.S forces learned that an American – Lindh – was among the cluster of Taliban fighters left in limbo after their leader surrendered to the Northern Alliance in the northern Afghanistan province of Mazar-i-Sharif. Spann was the first to go into a compound there, serving as a prison, to interview Lindh, peppering him with questions about where he was from and what he was doing. But Lindh refused to respond.

“In those moments, when he chose to stay silent, he sealed his fate as a traitor to the United States,” Allison Spann said. “At any point, he could have warned him that something was being planned.”

Hours later, Lindh’s fellow detainees erupted in a violent revolt that left Mike Spann dead.

The initial charges leveled against the then 20-year-old Lindh in 2002 included one for murder conspiracy due to the role he played in the deadly prison rebellion.

However, nine of the ten counts in an indictment were then dropped and Lindh ended up pleading guilty to disobeying an executive order outlawing support to the Taliban and for possessing a weapon in Afghanistan.

LINDH IS SET TO BE RELEASED – SHOULD WE BE WORRIED?

Sentencing reports have indicated that “good behavior” may serve as justification for Lindh’s early release.

A convert to Islam hailing from northern California’s Marin County, Lindh made the journey to Afghanistan after journeying through Yemen and Pakistan as a 19-year-old shortly before the Sept. 11 attacks. He underwent training in Kandahar and met with Al Qaeda chief Usama bin Laden on at least one occasion.

In 2017, the National Counterterrorism Center, according to documents obtained by Foreign Policy, underscored that Lindh continued to “advocate for global jihad and write and translate violent extremist texts.”

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Furthermore, he is alleged to have told a TV producer last March that he would “continue to spread violent extremism Islam upon his release.”

When he leaves lockup, Lindh, according to court records viewed by the Washington Post, will need permission to obtain Internet-connected devices, will not be allowed to talk online in any language but English and will be barred from having a passport, among other restrictions.

Fox News’ Lukas Mikelionis contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

The Islamic militant who became known as the infamous  “American Taliban” member is set to be released from a U.S. federal prison Thursday despite lawmakers’ concerns about the “security and safety implications” of freeing an unrepentant terrorist who officials say continues to “openly call for extremist violence.”

John Walker Lindh, who is currently behind bars in Terra Haute, Indiana, is set to be discharged May 23, several years before he would complete the prescribed 20-year prison sentence he received for joining and supporting the Taliban. The former Islamist fighter and enemy combatant, named “Detainee 001 in the war on terror,” was arrested in 2001, just months after the Sept. 11 attacks and the start of the war in Afghanistan, along with a group of Taliban fighters who were captured by U.S. forces.

“We must consider the security and safety implications for our citizens and communities who will receive individuals like John Walker Lindh, who continue to openly call for extremist violence,” Sens. Richard C. Shelby, R-Ala., and Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., wrote in a letter to the Federal Bureau of Prisons late last week that was obtained by the Washington Post.

In the letter, the lawmakers reportedly sought details on how the agency is working to prevent prisoners such as Lindh from committing additional crimes after their release. They also asked which other “terrorist offenders” are next in line to be freed and how the Federal Bureau of Prisons determines whether or not someone is an “ongoing public threat.”

Johnny "Mike" Spann with daughter Alison, who was the first American killed in the Afghanistan war soon after interviewing "American Taliban" John Walker Lindh.

Johnny “Mike” Spann with daughter Alison, who was the first American killed in the Afghanistan war soon after interviewing “American Taliban” John Walker Lindh. (Spann family/AP)

DAUGHTER OF AMERICAN KILLED AFTER SPEAKING WITH LINDH SLAMS UPCOMING EARLY RELEASE

Lindh has been blamed for playing a role in the death of Johnny “Mike” Spann, a U.S Marine turned CIA paramilitary operative who became the first American to be killed in combat in Afghanistan, amid the aftermath of the September 11 attacks. Spann’s daughter, Allison, told Fox News in March that Lindh’s early release “feels like such a slap in the face.”

In November 2001, U.S forces learned that an American – Lindh – was among the cluster of Taliban fighters left in limbo after their leader surrendered to the Northern Alliance in the northern Afghanistan province of Mazar-i-Sharif. Spann was the first to go into a compound there, serving as a prison, to interview Lindh, peppering him with questions about where he was from and what he was doing. But Lindh refused to respond.

“In those moments, when he chose to stay silent, he sealed his fate as a traitor to the United States,” Allison Spann said. “At any point, he could have warned him that something was being planned.”

Hours later, Lindh’s fellow detainees erupted in a violent revolt that left Mike Spann dead.

The initial charges leveled against the then 20-year-old Lindh in 2002 included one for murder conspiracy due to the role he played in the deadly prison rebellion.

However, nine of the ten counts in an indictment were then dropped and Lindh ended up pleading guilty to disobeying an executive order outlawing support to the Taliban and for possessing a weapon in Afghanistan.

LINDH IS SET TO BE RELEASED – SHOULD WE BE WORRIED?

Sentencing reports have indicated that “good behavior” may serve as justification for Lindh’s early release.

A convert to Islam hailing from northern California’s Marin County, Lindh made the journey to Afghanistan after journeying through Yemen and Pakistan as a 19-year-old shortly before the Sept. 11 attacks. He underwent training in Kandahar and met with Al Qaeda chief Usama bin Laden on at least one occasion.

In 2017, the National Counterterrorism Center, according to documents obtained by Foreign Policy, underscored that Lindh continued to “advocate for global jihad and write and translate violent extremist texts.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Furthermore, he is alleged to have told a TV producer last March that he would “continue to spread violent extremism Islam upon his release.”

When he leaves lockup, Lindh, according to court records viewed by the Washington Post, will need permission to obtain Internet-connected devices, will not be allowed to talk online in any language but English and will be barred from having a passport, among other restrictions.

Fox News’ Lukas Mikelionis contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

A Massachusetts state bill that would allow judges to sentence cop killers to death is designed to send a “clear message that we are not going to tolerate this,” a lawmaker said Tuesday.

Shaunna O’Connell, one of the bill’s co-sponsors, told ‘Fox & Friends’ that the measure was introduced following the murders of three officers in Massachusetts over the last 26 months. It would allow the death penalty as a sentencing option for adults over the age of 18 who have been found guilty of killing an officer.

“We need to send a clear message that we are not going to tolerate this,” she said. “We are going to protect our law enforcement officers and we are going to have some law and order in our communities.”

MASSACHUSETTS BILL SHOWS LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ‘THAT WE STAND WITH THEM’, LAWMAKER SAYS

Sgt. Michael Chesna – a U.S. Army veteran and Purple Heart recipient who worked with the Weymouth Police Department – was shot and killed in July 2018 with his own revolver, officials say, during an encounter with a suspect.

Sgt. Sean Gannon of the Yarmouth Police Department, whom O’Connell described as a “great person who you would want to call your son,” was shot and killed three months earlier while serving a search warrant.

And in May 2016, Ronald Tarentino, an Auburn Police Department officer, was shot and killed while conducting a traffic stop.

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O’Connell, a Republican, said that a dozen law enforcement associations — comprising of “thousands of thousands” of officers – have signed on in support of the bill.

“We are just going to deluge the statehouse with support for this bill,” she said. “They really need to take it seriously and they need to act on it.”

Source: Fox News National

A recent request from the White House for Congress to supply an additional $1.4 billion in funding to deal with the crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border is aimed at creating a “deterrent” that would hopefully impede the flow of migrants crossing over, a Border Patrol official says.

Roy Villareal, the chief of the agency’s Tucson sector, told “Fox & Friends” Monday that the money would go toward increasing the size of detention spaces that hold migrants.

“There has been a request for supplemental funding and the key or the linchpin to this is to create some sort of deterrent and that does not exist right now because we are releasing people,” he said. “And without detention space, there is nothing that is going to impede this flow.

Migrant children stand outside the Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children in Homestead, Fla, in May. The U.S. government is providing long-distance video counseling to teens housed at the country's largest migrant detention center as officials struggle to accommodate increasing numbers of minors illegally crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. (AP)

Migrant children stand outside the Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children in Homestead, Fla, in May. The U.S. government is providing long-distance video counseling to teens housed at the country’s largest migrant detention center as officials struggle to accommodate increasing numbers of minors illegally crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. (AP)

HUNDREDS OF MIGRANTS TO BE FLOWN TO CALIFORNIA IN AS MANY AS 3 FLIGHTS A WEEK, OFFICIALS SAY

“So the request for additional funding is so that we can either increase detention space – what we have done recently is we have erected two soft-sided facilities that can hold up to 500 migrants each – but we need help,” he added.

Villareal says current Border Patrol facilities designed to hold migrants are well over capacity.

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“Our normal detention capacity is about 4,000. A crisis level is 6,000… we are holding anywhere from 10 to 12 thousand people a day,” he said. “With this constant influx of migrants arriving every day, there is no relief in sight.”

He concluded that the “entire system needs a reboot.”

Source: Fox News National

Police in Alabama launched a dragnet Monday morning for a gunman they say shot and killed a police officer and wounded two others at a trailer park in Auburn late last night.

The officers were responding to a domestic disturbance call when Grady Wayne Wilkes – clad in camouflage body armor and a helmet – opened fire, authorities said.

“We do believe he is dangerous, and obviously in this situation was, to these officers,” Auburn Chief of Police Paul Register told reporters Monday.

Grady Wayne Wilkes, the suspect in the shootings, is considered armed and dangerous.

Grady Wayne Wilkes, the suspect in the shootings, is considered armed and dangerous. (Auburn Police Department)

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Register says two of the officers were seriously injured but are expected to recover. The deceased officer has not yet been identified.

A tweet posted on one of Auburn University’s accounts warned students to stay away from the Arrowhead Mobile Home Park, five miles away from its campus.

Source: Fox News National


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