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California is making it difficult for primary voters to review the criminal justice record of presidential hopeful Kamala Harris.

The state’s Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation recently removed archives on incarceration rates from its website. Harris has attempted to portray herself as a progressive on criminal justice on the campaign trail, but her record has faced growing scrutiny. Most recently, Harris was called out by one her 2020 challengers on the debate stage.

The reports contained information from Harris’ tenure as attorney general from 2011 through 2017. During that time, data shows more than 120,000 black and Latino citizens were sent to prison.

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“I believe that we in the United States Congress should start impeachment proceedings. Immediately,” he said, adding: “The politics of this be dammed. When we look at history at what happened when the president started acting like an authoritarian. The question is what will we have done? And I believe the Congress should do its job.” “I just want to make sure whatever we do doesn’t end up with an acquittal by [Senate Majority Leader] Mitch McConnell in the Senate and President Trump is saying he was acquitted by the Congress. I belief we have a moral obligation to beat Donald Trump. He has to be a single term president. And we can’t do anything that plays into his hands.” But Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet was more cautious.
New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said “It’s obvious the president committed the crimes worthy of impeachment.” Sen. Kamala Harris of California, who has said her Justice Department, if elected president, would go forward with obstruction of justices charges against Trump, was the first to elaborate. “We all watched the testimony [former special counsel Robert Muelle], I read the report,” she said. “There are 10 clear incidents of obstruction of justice by this president and he needs to be held accountable. I have seen people go to prison for far less.” Sen. Corey Booker of New Jersey agreed. Former Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development also was in favor of punishment. “I was first of candidate to call on Congress to begin impeachment proceedings,” he said, adding: “I believe that the evidence is plain and clear. And if it goes that far, you’re likely to see a prosecution of Donald Trump.” The progressive Democrats on the stage Wednesday night for the second round of debates among presidential candidates were all in favor of tossing President Donald Trump in jail.

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The resolution further calls capitalism “the greatest engine for human advancement in the history of the world, bringing more people out of poverty and into prosperity than any economic model in the history of mankind.” Sen. Steve Daines, R-Mont., introduced a resolution Monday condemning socialism —  warning progressive Democratic policies would lead to “complete government control.” Sen. Daines specifically attacked policies supported by the progressive wing of the Democratic Party, such as the Green New Deal and Medicare for All. The resolution claims the proposals would “eliminate the private property rights of all people of the United States,” the resolution stated. “A radical, socialist, far-left movement is growing across this country. And it has taken root as the new voice of the Democratic Party . . . Today we make a choice. Freedom or Socialism. I choose freedom,” said Daines, who is up for re-election next year, Montana’s Great Falls Tribune reported.

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“Leader McConnell doesn’t have to put the bills that we have proposed . . . or the bill the House has passed, there are bipartisan bills —and we can debate the issue,” Schumer added. “These pundits are lying, lying when they dismiss the work that has been done,” McConnell said, The Hill reported. “They’re lying when they insist I have personally blocked actions which, in fact, I have championed and the Senate has passed. They are lying when they suggest that either party is against defending our democracy.” Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., on Monday chided Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., for complaining about becoming a victim of “modern-day McCarthyism” for blocking two election security bills last week. The comments followed McConnell’s fiery retaliation at critics, accusing them of “lying” and “modern-day McCarthyism” for targeting his block of the Democrat-supported election security measures. But Schumer challenged McConnell: “Prove them wrong.” “If Leader McConnell doesn’t like being criticized on election security, I challenge him: Let’s debate it on the floor with amendments,” Schumer said, The Hill reported. “I challenge him: support additional appropriations for states to harden their election systems. In both cases, Leader McConnell has not done that.” “There’s an easy way for Leader McConnell to silence the critics who accuse him of blocking election security: stop blocking it,” the Senate minority leader said, The Hill reported.

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— The White House (@WhiteHouse) July 29, 2019
One of those heroes and an advocate for the legislation was Luis Alvarez, a retired New York Police Department detective who testified before Congress last month to tell of his battle with cancer and nearly 70 rounds of chemotherapy.

“This fund is not a ticket to paradise, it’s to help take care of our families when we cant,” “You all said never forget, well I’m here to make sure that you don’t.”

Alvarez died two weeks later.

President Donald Trump holds up H.R. 1327, an act ensuring that a victims’ compensation fund related to the Sept. 11 attacks never runs out of money, after signing it in the Rose Garden of the White House as member of the audience applaud and celebrate, Monday, July 29, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

The bill will extend funds to pay for medical expenses of police officers, firefighters, and other first responders who are experiencing illnesses related to their rescue efforts following the attack.

“This critical legislation would fully fund the September 11th compensation fund to make sure all those exposed and impacted by the related illnesses are thoroughly compensated, and for those conditions diagnosed in the future,” stated Senator Cory Garner (R-Colo.).

“For your entire lives you have gone far beyond your duty to us and today we strive to fulfill our sacred duty to you. We love you, we honor you and we thank you. God bless you all.” — President Trump
President Trump Signs H.R. 1327 https://t.co/r1YBKEX3hY
President Trump signed a bill to extend health funding for the heroes who responded to the tragic September 11th terrorist attacks. He signed the 9/11 victims compensation bill, also known as H.R. 1327, during a ceremony Monday. The move marked an end to weeks of congressional debates.
President Donald Trump holds up H.R. 1327, an act ensuring that a victims’ compensation fund related to the Sept. 11 attacks never runs out of money, after signing it in the Rose Garden of the White House as member of the audience applaud and celebrate, Monday, July 29, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

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— Barack Obama (@BarackObama) July 27, 2019
The Obama-endorsed op-ed ends by telling readers to “expect more.” In the meantime, it remains unclear whether or not an investigation will be launched.
Former Democrat President Barack Obama is pictured. (AP Photo)
— Ronna McDaniel, chairwoman – RNC

Former President Obama and his administration have continued seemingly hypocritical attacks on President Trump despite new scrutiny over his illegal oversight of the Trump campaign.

I’ve always been proud of what this team accomplished during my administration. But more than what we did, I’m proud of how they’re continuing to fight for an America that’s better. https://t.co/0cfDltjueP
Obama recently seemed to up the ante on his criticism of the president as he took to Twitter to promote an anti-Trump op-ed by the Washington Post over the weekend. In the piece, 149 of Obama’s former White House aides accused President Trump of  “poisoning American democracy.” It also took aim at the president’s supporters by calling them “racist, xenophobic and homophobic.”

The authors also cite “relentless attacks” on the legitimacy of Obama’s presidency, but their attacks on President Trump seem to rebuke Obama’s call for caution on labeling people.

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The law lays out requirements for patients to be eligible for a doctor-assisted suicide. The terminally ill patient is required to have an incurable diagnosis with six months or less to live, ask their doctor for prescription drugs to end their life twice within a 15-day time frame, and submit a written request for an assisted suicide witnessed by two other people.
However, not everyone is on board with giving terminally ill patients the right to die. Opponents, including medical professionals and religious leaders, argue the emotionally charged law would limit the patient’s freedom and inhibit doctors from providing potentially life-saving treatments.

“I will tell you this is not about freedom and autonomy and choice, this limits your freedom, it limits your access to care and it decreases your ability to obtain life-saving care. I deal with terminal patients every day, I’ve done it for over 30 years and this is getting worse and worse.”

Supporters of New Jersey’s so called ‘right-to-die’ law await the legislation to take effect this week. Earlier this year, New Jersey became the eighth U.S. state to pass an assisted suicide law, which allows terminally ill patients to end their lives with prescribed medication from a doctor.

Despite the ongoing debate on the morality of assisted suicide, the legislation will officially become law in New Jersey on Thursday.

” I’m a witness to watching my beautiful, intelligent mother whimper in agony as cancer spread from her breast to her bones and then to her brain…the doctor gave her the last dose of morphine and I held my mother’s hand and watched as her breathing became shallower until she passed peacefully. I’m here to ask you to make the just decision — one that allows someone to have that right if they are deemed to be terminally ill to end their life in peace with their family.” — Dr. T. Brian Callister, opponent to assisted suicide law

— Carol Rizzo, supporter of assisted suicide law
(Shaun Best/Reuters Photo)
In addition, a second doctor must verify the diagnoses is correct and the patient must be “fully informed” of other treatment options, including pain control.

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Papadopoulos specifically requested the Department of Justice look at the dollar bills given to him due to the department’s probe into the origins of the Russia probe, with Papadopoulos being used as a reason to start an investigation. The money is believed to be supplemental evidence as the Justice Department is getting closer to acquiring transcripts of recorded conversations between Papadopoulos and an alleged informant of the FBI — Stefan Halper.

“They were looking to make a conspiracy case, using me with this fake information to then hurt Trump…what they were trying to do is fabricate a conspiracy among the Trump campaign and President Trump using their own people,”

Former Trump campaign aide George Papadopoulos is going to Greece to return ,000 given to him for reasons he believes constitute as entrapment. Papadopoulos claims the money is marked bills, and was given to him in a plot by the Obama-era FBI and CIA to charge him with a violation of the Foreign Agents Registration Act. The money aroused suspicion with Papadopoulos, prompting him to turn it into his lawyer where it has been stored in a safe.

“All my work was actually dedicated to undermining Russian influence and interests throughout the world
yet I find myself somehow as Patient Zero of a Russian conspiracy, and that was the moment when I realized how dominant and how manipulative PSYOPs (psychological operations) are,”

said the former Trump campaign aide.

George Papadopoulos, a former member of the foreign policy panel to Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, poses for a photo before a TV interview in New York, New York, U.S., March 26, 2019. REUTERS/Carlo Allegr

Papadopoulos was approached by a man named Joseph Misfud in 2016, who told him about Russian knowledge of dirt on Clinton. Papadopoulos then urged a Department of Justice investigation into the Obama-era FBI’s role in starting the Russia probe and fueling the “collusion hoax.”

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Nonetheless, the incident was used to highlight a lack of coordination between the White House and the intelligence community with Coats often being the bearer of bad news. President Trump was vocal about his disagreements with Coats, reportedly telling him behind the scenes to stay quiet about threats of Russian meddling and even calling him out publicly in certain settings.

“Can you give me an example, other than Donald Trump, where the Justice Department determined that an investigated person was not exonerated because their innocence was not conclusively determined? …You can’t find it because, I’ll tell you why, it doesn’t exist.” 

On Sunday, President Trump announced Republican Representative John Ratcliffe will take over as Director of National Intelligence (DNI). Ratcliffe has long been considered to be a Trump ally, but apparently made an impression during his interrogation of Robert Mueller. He had this to say during the hearing:

Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas., asks questions to former special counsel Robert Mueller, as he testifies before the House Judiciary Committee hearing on his report on Russian election interference, on Capitol Hill, in Washington, Wednesday, July 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The latest change at the DNI could be a sign that the president is looking to downsize the department altogether in order to concentrate on information sharing efforts. Coats is expected to leave the department on Thursday, August 15th with the president saying an active director will be named in the near future.

There’s another shake-up in the Trump administration, with the latest move likely having a trickle-effect throughout the rest of the government.
The Texas congressman was already a rising star in the Republican Party after winning his election with more than 70-percent of the vote in the 2018 midterms. Ratcliffe was facing off against other high profile officials for the job, including chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Joseph Dunford. He also challenged Fred Fleitz, the former Chief of Staff for National Security Adviser John Bolton.

Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas., asks questions to former special counsel Robert Mueller, as he testifies before the House Judiciary Committee hearing on his report on Russian election interference, on Capitol Hill, in Washington, Wednesday, July 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Ratcliffe will now be elevated to a post where the current official, Dan Coats, has often been at odds with the president and his administration. Perhaps the most memorable event during his tenure was his response after learning President Trump invited Russian President Vladimir Putin to the White House. When asked about the invitation he laughed and acted as if it were a joke. Coats later said he meant no disrespect to the White House and admitted the exchange was somewhat awkward.

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In January, Coats again was reportedly in Trump’s dog house when he told a Senate committee that North Korea was unlikely to give up its nuclear weapons, which contradicted the president’s more optimistic view. At last year’s Aspen Security Forum, Coats reportedly angered Trump when he  appeared to criticize the president’s ties with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer slammed on Sunday President Donald Trump’s choice of Rep. John Ratcliffe to replace Dan Coats as director of national intelligence, The Hill reported. “It’s clear that Rep. Ratcliffe was selected because he exhibited blind loyalty to President Trump with his demagogic questioning of former Special Counsel Robert Mueller ” Schumer said in a statement. “If Senate Republicans elevate such a partisan player to a position that requires intelligence expertise and non-partisanship, it would be a big mistake.” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wrote on Twitter that the successor for Coats “must put patriotism before politics, and remember that his oath is to protect the Constitution and the American people, not the President.” Trump had reportedly soured on Coats several times during his tenure. Axios reported that Trump was impressed by Ratcliffe’s performance during his questioning of Mueller at congressional hearings on Wednesday. Sen Eliabeth Warren, who is running for the Democratic nomination for president in 2020, added in a tweet that “Our Director of National Intelligence should be above partisan politics, speak truth to power, and resist Trump’s abuses of authority. John Ratcliffe doesn’t fit that bill.” It is not yet clear how the Senate overall will react to Ratcliffe’s nomination, according to The Hill.  However, his membership in the House Intelligence Committee will likely appeal to Republican senators.

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