JAKARTA, Indonesia

The Latest on Indonesia’s election (all times local):

6 p.m.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo says he’s the winner of the country’s presidential election with preliminary results showing he received 54% of the vote.

He told reporters about 20 leaders of nations from Southeast Asia and other regions have congratulated him on securing a second term.

The vote estimate is based on so-called quick counts of a sample of polling stations by reputable survey organizations. He said that 100% of sample polling stations have now been counted or close to that. The quick counts have been accurate in previous elections.

Widodo’s rival, former Gen. Prabowo Subianto, has claimed he won 62% of the vote in Wednesday’s election based on his campaign’s own counts, repeating a similar claim when he lost to Widodo in 2014.

The Election Commission is required to release official results by May 22.

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2 p.m.

Indonesia’s top security minister and its military and police chiefs said Thursday that they will crack down decisively on any attempts to disrupt public order while official results from presidential and legislative elections are tabulated.

Preliminary results from Wednesday’s election show President Joko Widodo has comfortably won a second term, but his challenger, ultra-nationalist former general Prabowo Subianto, has claimed victory, repeating his tactics following his 2014 loss to Widodo.

Security minister Wiranto, who uses a single name, told a news conference with the chiefs of police and all military branches that security forces will “act decisively” against any threats to order and security.

He said the voter turnout of 80.5% gives the winner of the presidential election “high legitimacy.” The Election Commission is required to release official results by May 22.

Source: Fox News World

Indonesia’s top security minister and its military and police chiefs say they will crack down decisively on any attempts to disrupt public order while official results from presidential and legislative elections are tabulated.

Preliminary results show President Joko Widodo has comfortably won a second term, but his challenger Prabowo Subianto is claiming victory, repeating his tactics following his 2014 loss to Widodo.

Security minister Wiranto, who uses a single name, held a press conference Thursday with police and military chiefs and said security forces will “act decisively” against any threats to order and security.

He said the voter turnout of 80.5% gives the winner of the presidential election “high legitimacy.” The Election Commission is required to release official results by May 22.

Source: Fox News World

Indonesia’s elections pit Joko Widodo, the first Indonesian president from outside the Jakarta elite, against Prabowo Subianto, a former special forces general from the era of authoritarian rule under military dictator Suharto.

Some facts and figures about Wednesday’s elections:

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BY THE NUMBERS

Nearly 193 million Indonesians are eligible to vote in the archipelago stretching across thousands of islands and three time zones.

The 810,000 polling stations have more than 1.6 million bottles of halal-certified indelible ink ready. Voters will dip a finger in the ink after casting their votes as an anti-fraud measure.

The Election Commission estimates more than 17 million people are involved in ensuring the elections run smoothly, including volunteers, guards and registered witnesses for every polling station.

About 20,500 candidates are standing for the presidency, the Senate and legislatures at the national, provincial and district levels.

Staging the election will cost about $1.9 billion.

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DEMOCRATIC OUTPOST

After three decades of military rule ended in 1998, Indonesia has become the most robust democracy in Southeast Asia, a region where authoritarian governments and stage-managed elections are the norm.

But despite being the world’s most populous Muslim nation, the third-largest democracy and a member of the Group of 20 major economies, Indonesia has a low profile on the world stage. That is slowly changing, with the country recently becoming a non-permanent member of the U.N. Security Council, announcing a bid to host the 2032 Olympics and analysts forecasting its economy to be among the world’s five largest by 2030.

Source: Fox News World

The Latest on Indonesia’s presidential and legislative elections (all times local):

8:30 a.m.

President candidate Prabowo Subianto has voted in Indonesia’s presidential and legislative elections and says he confident of winning despite polls showing that he trails President Joko Widodo by up to 20 percentage points.

After voting, Subianto, a former special forces general, echoed his campaign themes of a weak Indonesia at risk of disintegration.

Speaking in English, he said “I promised that we will work for the good of the country. If it’s chaos or not it’s not coming from us, but I guarantee that we don’t want to be cheated anymore, that Indonesian people don’t want to be cheated anymore.”

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7 a.m.

Voting is underway in presidential and legislative elections in Indonesia, the world’s third-biggest democracy, after a campaign that pitted the moderate incumbent against an ultranationalist former general.

The first votes were cast in easternmost provinces after polling booths opened at 7 a.m. followed an hour later by central regions such as Bali and then the capital Jakarta and western provinces. Indonesia, a sprawling archipelago of 17,000 islands, has three time zones.

About 193 million people are eligible to vote in polls that will decide who leads the world’s most populous Muslim-majority nation. The campaign pit President Joko Widodo against Prabowo Subianto, a former general from the Suharto military dictatorship era.

Source: Fox News World

Voting is underway in Indonesia’s presidential and legislative elections after a campaign that that pitted the moderate incumbent against an ultra-nationalist former general.

Polling booths opened at 7 a.m. Wednesday in easternmost provinces and voting begins in the capital Jakarta two hours later. Indonesia has three time zones.

About 193 million people are eligible to vote in polls that will decide who leads the world’s most populous Muslim-majority nation.

Voting ends at 1 p.m. and so called “quick count” results are expected after about two hours.

The presidential race is a choice between five more years of the steady progress achieved under Indonesia’s first president from outside the Jakarta elite, Joko Widodo, or electing Prabowo Subianto, a former general from the era of the Suharto military dictatorship.

Source: Fox News World

Indonesia’s Election Commission says about 320,000 overseas voters in neighboring Malaysia’s biggest city should vote in presidential and legislative elections again following allegations postal ballots were tampered with.

The commission at a news conference Tuesday also said the overseas vote in Sydney should be reopened because many expatriate Indonesians in the city were unable to cast ballots in time.

The commission last week sent officials to Malaysia to investigate claims of vote fraud after videos circulated online of thousands of ballots for Wednesday’s election scattered throughout a shophouse.

Source: Fox News World

Nearly 193 million Indonesians are eligible to vote in presidential and legislative elections on Wednesday. President Joko Widodo, the first Indonesian president from outside the Jakarta elite, is competing against Prabowo Subianto, a former special forces general from the era of authoritarian rule under military dictator Suharto.

Some election facts and figures:

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BY THE NUMBERS

The election is a huge logistical exercise costing about 27.6 trillion rupiah ($1.9 billion). Indonesians are casting votes not only for president but about 20,500 other candidates standing for the Senate and legislatures at the national, provincial and district levels.

Election officials are providing more than 1.6 million bottles of halal-certified indelible ink for voters to dip a finger in after casting ballots at some 810,000 polling stations. The Election Commission estimates more than 17 million people are involved in ensuring the elections run smoothly, including volunteers, guards and registered witnesses for every polling station. But poster-sized ballots have drawn criticism as a challenge for elderly voters.

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DEMOCRATIC OUTPOST

After three decades of military rule ended in 1998, Indonesia has become the most robust democracy in Southeast Asia, a region where authoritarian governments and stage-managed elections are the norm.

But despite being the world’s most populous Muslim nation, the third-largest democracy and a member of the Group of 20 major economies, Indonesia has a low profile on the world stage. That is slowly changing, with the country recently becoming a non-permanent member of the U.N. Security Council, announcing a bid to host the 2032 Olympics and analysts forecasting its economy to be among the world’s five largest by 2030.

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CAMPAIGN ISSUES

The presidential contenders are stark contrasts in background and personality. The slightly nerdy Widodo is admired for his friendly, down-to-earth manner. Subianto, from a wealthy family, is prone to explosions of anger and has an emotional, tub-thumping style of campaigning. Both are nationalists and Muslims, though Subianto’s nationalism sits at the extreme end of the spectrum.

Subianto’s campaign has been negative and fear-based, emphasizing what he sees as Indonesia’s current dire situation and the risk of exploitation by foreign powers or disintegration. Widodo, the front-runner in all credible polls, has emphasized his government’s efforts to improve infrastructure and reduce poverty, and can show progress in both areas.

Source: Fox News World

About 193 million Indonesians are eligible to vote in a presidential election that will decide who leads a nation that’s an outpost of democracy in a neighborhood of authoritarian governments.

Their choice Wednesday is between five more years of the steady progress achieved under Indonesia’s first president from outside the Jakarta elite or electing a charismatic but volatile figure from the era of the Suharto military dictatorship that ended two decades ago.

In the final moves of the campaign, the front-runner, President Joko Widodo, dashed to Saudi Arabia to meet its king and perform a minor pilgrimage.

The message intended by Widodo’s trip to the birthplace of Islam was obvious after a campaign in which conservative opponents tried to discredit him as insufficiently Islamic.

Source: Fox News World

Indonesia’s presidential election Wednesday pits incumbent Joko Widodo against former special forces Gen. Prabowo Subianto in a repeat of the 2014 contest. Widodo, a furniture exporter and heavy metal fan who had a meteoric rise in Indonesian politics, chose a conservative Muslim cleric as his vice presidential candidate. Subianto’s running mate is a self-made tycoon.

A look at the presidential and vice presidential candidates:

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JOKO WIDODO

Usually known as Jokowi, Widodo’s political career began in the central Javanese city of Solo and hit the big time when he became governor of Jakarta, Indonesia’s capital, in 2012. A down-to-earth style and reputation for clean governance helped propel him to the presidency in 2014.

Widodo, 57, was likened to Barack Obama, and progressive voters hoped that as the first Indonesian president from outside the Jakarta elite he would address a catalog of major human rights abuses in the country. But while in office, he has been unwilling to press for accountability that threatens powerful institutions such as the military. Instead he has emphasized nationalism while also fending off attacks that he is insufficiently Muslim.

Widodo’s signature policy has been improving Indonesia’s poor infrastructure. He also continued the poverty alleviation policies of his predecessor.

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MA’RUF AMIN

One of the most important religious figures in Muslim-majority Indonesia, Amin was selected as Widodo’s running mate to shore up his support among pious Muslims. He was chairman of Majelis Ulama Indonesia, the country’s council of Islamic leaders, and supreme leader of Nahdlatul Ulama, the world’s largest Muslim organization. An avuncular, almost Yoda-like appearance belies Amin’s reactionary beliefs.

Amin, 76, has been a vocal supporter and drafter of fatwas against religious minorities and LGBT people. Human Rights Watch says the fatwas, or edicts, have legitimized increasingly hateful rhetoric by government officials against LGBT people, and in some cases fueled deadly violence by Islamic militants against religious minorities.

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PRABOWO SUBIANTO

Subianto, a former special forces general who was dismissed from the military in 1998, is making his second run at the presidency after narrowly losing to Widodo in 2014. A strident nationalist, he has run a fear-based campaign, highlighting what he sees as Indonesia’s weakness and the risk of exploitation by foreign powers or disintegration.

Subianto, 67, has sometimes highlighted a novel about a future world war that briefly mentions Indonesia as part of the basis for those fears. He was a star officer during the Suharto era and married the dictator’s daughter. After Suharto was forced from office by social and economic chaos in 1998, Subianto was dismissed from the military. Soldiers under his command had kidnapped student activists, some of whom remain missing.

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SANDIAGA UNO

A self-made tycoon and deputy governor of Jakarta, Uno — commonly known as Sandi — has reportedly spent millions of his own money on the campaign. Articulate and youthful looking at 49, he has been more active on the campaign trail than his running mate and has been the ticket’s way of appealing to the burgeoning number of young voters.

Nearly a decade ago, Uno was profiled by CNN as an inspirational entrepreneur from humble roots who claimed to have the ear of then Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. His role in the 2019 campaign has raised his profile nationally and he is already talked about as a possible 2024 presidential candidate.

Source: Fox News World

Tens of thousands of Indonesians have flocked to presidential campaign rallies ahead of a final debate between the two candidates.

Supporters of President Joko Widodo filled a stadium in central Jakarta on Saturday, while the campaign of his challenger, Prabowo Subianto, held a rally in a satellite city.

Widodo and Subianto appear in the final of five televised debates between the presidential and vice presidential candidates on Saturday evening.

About 193 million Indonesians are eligible to vote Wednesday in presidential and legislative elections.

Polls show Widodo with a big lead, but some analysts say the race is tighter than it appears.

Subianto supporter Akhirudin Konsi said he wants a “president who will fight for our rights and stand behind people, who will lower prices, especially education, fuel and basic needs.”

Source: Fox News World


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