NewsMax Politics

Charles Kushner, the father of President Donald Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner, argued in a rare opinion piece his family real estate business is healthy and took several steps to prevent a conflict of interest when Jared Kushner joined the Trump administration more than two years ago.

Writing for The Washington Post, Charles Kushner made the case his son helped steer Kushner Companies down the path to massive success as CEO from 2008-2017. He focused on the company's 2007 purchase of 666 Fifth Ave. in New York City for most of his piece.

"Critics of our 666 Fifth Ave. purchase often focus their attacks on my son Jared Kushner, who became chief executive in 2008. That criticism is also baseless," the elder Kushner wrote. "You wouldn't know it from the way his nine-year stewardship of the company has been portrayed, but before he resigned to join the Trump administration in 2017, Jared led major property acquisitions worth more than $5 billion, and the company grew from about 50 employees to more than 700.

"We now have more than $7 billion of assets under management."

Kushner then outlined some of the steps the company took as his son was preparing to work in the White House.

"When he left the company, Jared took several steps to preclude conflicts of interest. At the recommendation of his legal counsel, in consultation with the Office of Government Ethics, he divested from more than 80 partnerships, including 666 Fifth Ave., at a substantial financial sacrifice," Kushner wrote.

"We walled off Jared from receiving information on the company, and he resigned as the controlling partner in more than 100 entities. This was all done out of an abundance of caution."

Source: NewsMax Politics

Former Tallahassee mayor and Florida gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum, calling his state "unorganized," on Wednesday told Politico he plans to launch a massive voter registration effort to register 1 million new voters before the 2020 presidential election.

"We're looking at a target of 1 million – we've got over 3 million people eligible to vote, and that's to say nothing of the 1.4 million returning citizens,” he said in reference to the former felons who will have their voting rights restored following a constitutional amendment approved by voters last year.

"Voter registration is red flag No. 1," he added.

Gillum on Wednesday also told The New York Times during a wide-ranging interview that Democrats have not been disciplined in Florida and organizing is key to defeating President Donald Trump.

"When you don't have a governor who can raise money for a party in 24 years, it's very difficult for you to expect that party to turn on a dime and pull rabbits out of the hat," he said. "I'd say it's a failure, writ large, of how people have treated Florida when it comes to organizing. It's a state to go to when you want a presidential win, but outside of that? Good luck."

Gillum told The Daily Beast he plans to pull from his list of supporters and volunteers to help register new voters.

"We're going to be a major player and deliver Florida to whoever the Democratic nominee is," he told the news outlet.

Source: NewsMax Politics

Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger joined a packed chorus to defend the late Sen. John McCain against President Donald Trump's renewed assault on the Vietnam War pilot who spent five and a half years as a POW.

"He was just an unbelievable person," Schwarzenegger told The Atlantic. "So an attack on him is absolutely unacceptable if he's alive or dead — but even twice as unacceptable since he passed away a few months ago. It doesn't make any sense whatsoever to do that. I just think it's a shame that the president lets himself down to that kind of level. We will be lucky if everyone in Washington followed McCain's example because he represented courage."

Trump and McCain feuded since the 2016 campaign when Trump questioned McCain's war hero status. The pair never got along after that, and McCain, an Arizona Republican, cast the deciding vote to shoot down the GOP-backed measure to repeal Obamacare in 2017.

Trump has spoken ill of McCain, who died last August after a battle with brain cancer, on multiple occasions in recent days.

"He was a great public servant, no two ways about that, Schwarzenegger said. "He was known for his honesty, for his courage, and his patriotism and his service.

"The president should lift people up, should lift the nation up rather than always tearing people down."

Schwarzenegger then doled out some advice to Trump regarding bullying.

"Why don't you go and sit down with your wife for just a few minutes, Mr. President, and listen to the First Lady when she's talking about stopping online bullying," he said. "That is a really great message. Which way do we go? Your way, or her way. That's really the question here."

Source: NewsMax Politics

Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger joined a packed chorus to defend the late Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., against President Donald Trump's renewed assault on the Vietnam War pilot who spent five and a half years as a POW.

"He was just an unbelievable person," Schwarzenegger told The Atlantic. "So, an attack on him is absolutely unacceptable if he's alive or dead — but even twice as unacceptable since he passed away a few months ago. It doesn't make any sense whatsoever to do that. I just think it's a shame that the president lets himself down to that kind of level. We will be lucky if everyone in Washington followed McCain's example because he represented courage."

Trump and McCain feuded since the 2016 campaign when Trump questioned McCain's war hero status. The pair never got along after that, and McCain cast the deciding vote to shoot down the GOP-backed measure to repeal Obamacare in 2017.

Trump has spoken ill of McCain, who died last August after a battle with brain cancer, on multiple occasions in recent days.

"He was a great public servant, no two ways about that," Schwarzenegger said. "He was known for his honesty, for his courage, and his patriotism and his service.

"The president should lift people up, should lift the nation up rather than always tearing people down."

Schwarzenegger then doled out some advice to Trump regarding bullying.

"Why don't you go and sit down with your wife for just a few minutes, Mr. President, and listen to the first lady when she's talking about stopping online bullying," he said. "That is a really great message. Which way do we go? Your way, or her way. That's really the question here."

Source: NewsMax Politics

Former Vice President Joe Biden's recent meeting with Stacey Abrams, a former lawmaker in the Georgia House of Representatives, has sparked speculation the two could team up for a presidential run in the upcoming election.

Biden has yet to publicly announce his candidacy for president, but stories in recent days have claimed he is preparing to launch a campaign.

Last week, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported Biden and Abrams met in Washington, D.C., about their political futures — Biden for president and Abrams potentially for the Senate — following her failed campaign to serve as Georgia governor last fall.

The Associated Press reported Biden requested the meeting.

CNN reported earlier this week, meanwhile, Biden is looking to choose a running mate early in his campaign, making his meeting with Abrams more notable. A Biden aide told the network that bringing a running mate onboard earlier than normal would show voters Biden is serious about unseating President Donald Trump.

The Journal-Constitution also reported Abrams has met with other Democrats who are already confirmed presidential candidates as she ponders what is next in her political life.

Source: NewsMax Politics

Beto O’Rourke “enjoys a set of privileges in his decision making that” others don’t, former Tallahassee mayor and Florida gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum said Wednesday in an interview with The New York Times.

“Can you imagine it for any of the women that are in the race for president or considering a run?” Gillum said during a wide-ranging interview where he said he wasn’t running for president and outlined his plans to help Democrats win the presidency in 2020.

“They probably could not muse out loud, or in the recesses of their mind have these sorts of conversations and then say them out loud, and think it would be taken seriously or they would be taken seriously.”

“I recognize that, but, as I understand it, the congressman also recognizes that there is privilege that accompanies him here,” he added. “That doesn’t make him less deserving of consideration, it’s just something that has to be acknowledged.”

O’Rourke, the former representative who lost a close race for senator to Ted Cruz last November in deep-red Texas, announced his candidacy last week.

The Times’ asked whether O’Rourke’s entrance into the presidential race was a “sign of privilege, as some have suggested.”

O’Rourke has described himself as a white man who has had privileges, and last week said he would be more thoughtful in “the way in which I acknowledge the truth of the criticism that I have enjoyed white privilege.”

Source: NewsMax Politics

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., is coming to the defense of his late friend John McCain in the face of continued attacks by President Donald Trump.

After Trump threw another volley of verbal shots at McCain, a war hero, former POW, and retired Republican senator who died after a battle with brain cancer last August, Graham told reporters Wednesday that Trump's words are doing more damage to himself than McCain.

"I think the president's comments about Sen. McCain hurt him more than they hurt the legacy of Sen. McCain. I'm going to try to continue to help the president," Graham said.

"My job is to represent the people of South Carolina. They want me to work with the president where I can. I've gotten to know the president. We have a good working relationship. I like him."

Graham, however, added that he's not happy when Trump takes aim at McCain. The president and the late senator feuded ever since Trump questioned his status as a war hero during the 2016 campaign. Trump is still bitter about McCain's no vote on the Obamacare repeal in 2017, which killed the measure.

"I don't like when he says things about my friend John McCain," Graham said. "The best thing that can happen, I think, for all of us is to move forward."

Source: NewsMax Politics

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., is coming to the defense of his late friend John McCain in the face of continued attacks by President Donald Trump.

After Trump threw another volley of verbal shots at McCain, a war hero, former POW, and retired Republican senator who died after a battle with brain cancer last August, Graham told reporters Wednesday that Trump's words are doing more damage to himself than McCain.

"I think the president's comments about Sen. McCain hurt him more than they hurt the legacy of Sen. McCain," Graham said. "I'm going to try to continue to help the president.

"My job is to represent the people of South Carolina. They want me to work with the president where I can. I've gotten to know the president. We have a good working relationship. I like him."

Graham, however, added he is not happy when Trump takes aim at McCain. The president and the late senator feuded ever since Trump questioned his status as a war hero during the 2016 campaign. Trump is still bitter about McCain's no vote on the Obamacare repeal in 2017, which killed the measure.

"I don't like when he says things about my friend John McCain," Graham said. "The best thing that can happen, I think, for all of us is to move forward."

Source: NewsMax Politics

Just 36 percent of registered voters support impeaching President Donald Trump, a 7-point percent decrease from December stemming from a drop in Democrats who have changed their mind, a CNN poll finds.

In December, 80 percent of Democrats said they were in favor of impeachment, but that number now stands at 68 percent. The poll follows a statement by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., that impeachment would be "so divisive to the country."

Additionally, the poll found:

  • 50 percent of college graduates backed impeachment in December compared to 35 percent now.
  • Support for impeachment fell drastically since last June, when 47 percent of voters said they backed such an effort.
  • About 40 percent say Democrats are overreaching in investigating Trump, while 34 percent say they are doing the right amount, and 22 percent say they are doing too little.
  • 53 percent say most Americans think Trump is not doing enough to cooperate with investigations by Democrats, while 32 percent say it is the right amount.
  • 67 percent say Trump should release his tax returns publicly.
  • 48 percent approve of the job special counsel Robert Mueller is doing compared to 37 percent who say they disapprove.

The CNN poll was conducted by SSRS March 14-17 among a random national sample of 1,003 adults.

Source: NewsMax Politics

New York freshman lawmaker Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez fired back at JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon for criticizing her Green New Deal, saying JPMorgan “maybe” wasn’t the “best authority on prioritizing economic wellbeing of everyday people & the planet” following its 2013 settlement with the Justice Department for misleading investors about securities containing toxic mortgages.

"JP Morgan agreed to pay out *$13 billion* over its massive role in mortgage schemes w the ‘08 recession," Ocasio-Cortez wrote on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. "They also finance major fossil fuel pipelines. It’s big money."

Dimon on Tuesday told CNN he wasn’t concerned about the Green New Deal as he doesn’t spend much time “worrying about things that I can’t effectuate. Can you focus on climate change in an intelligent way that doesn’t damage the economy? Yes, you can. It’s called CO2 emission taxes, or trading, there’s couple of ways to do it. So you better do it wisely because you could hurt the economy, which hurts everybody.”

AOC’s proposal, which was also crafted by Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., says it will pay attention to groups like the poor, disabled, and minority communities that could be disproportionately affected by massive economic transitions. The deal sets goals for some drastic measures to cut carbon emissions across the economy and aims to create jobs.

Source: NewsMax Politics


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