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FILE PHOTO: The Supreme Court stands before decisions are released for the term in Washington
FILE PHOTO: The Supreme Court is seen in Washington, U.S., May 14, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

March 19, 2019

By Lawrence Hurley

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Supreme Court on Tuesday endorsed U.S. government authority to detain immigrants awaiting deportation anytime – potentially even years – after they have completed prison terms for criminal convictions, handing President Donald Trump a victory as he pursues hardline immigration policies.

The court ruled 5-4, with its conservative justices in the majority and its liberal justices dissenting, that federal authorities could pick up such immigrants and place them into indefinite detention at any time, not just immediately after they finish their prison sentences.

The ruling, authored by conservative Justice Samuel Alito, leaves open the possibility of individual immigrants challenging the federal law involved in the case on constitutional grounds if they are detained long after they have completed their sentences.

In dissent, liberal Justice Stephen Breyer questioned whether the U.S. Congress when it wrote the law “meant to allow the government to apprehend persons years after their release from prison and hold them indefinitely without a bail hearing.”

The Trump administration had appealed a lower court ruling in the case that favored immigrants, a decision it said would undermine the government’s ability to deport immigrants who have committed crimes. Trump has backed limits on legal and illegal immigrants since taking office in January 2017.

The plaintiffs included two legal U.S. residents involved in separate lawsuits filed in 2013, a Cambodian immigrant named Mony Preap convicted of marijuana possession and a Palestinian immigrant named Bassam Yusuf Khoury convicted of attempting to manufacture a controlled substance.

Under federal immigration law, immigrants convicted of certain offenses are subject to mandatory detention during their deportation process. They can be held indefinitely without a bond hearing after completing their sentences.

(Reporting by Lawrence Hurley; Editing by Will Dunham)

Source: OANN

Oyub Titiev, the head of human rights group Memorial in Chechnya, attends his verdict hearing at a court in the town of Shali, in Chechnya
Oyub Titiev, the head of human rights group Memorial in Chechnya, attends his verdict hearing at a court in the town of Shali, in Chechnya, Russia, March 18, 2019. REUTERS/Said Tsarnayev

March 19, 2019

LONDON (Reuters) – British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt condemned the sentence handed out to a prominent human rights activist by a court in Chechnya, calling it “an awful example of Russia suppressing vital work of human rights defenders”.

Oyub Titiev, who runs the office of the Memorial Human Rights Center in the southern Russian region, was sentenced to four years in a penal settlement on Monday after he was found guilty of possessing illegal drugs. His supporters say he was framed, with the drugs planted in his car.

Hunt wrote on Twitter on Tuesday: “Fabricated charges & absurd sentence imposed on Oyub Titiev are intended to silence his work in holding Russian govt to account for human rights abuses in Chechnya – they must #FreeTitiev.”

(Reporting by Michael Holden; editing by Stephen Addison)

Source: OANN

Honduran migrant Ariel, 19, who is waiting for his court hearing for asylum seekers returned to Mexico to wait out their legal proceedings under a new policy change by the U.S. government, is pictured after an interview with Reuters in Tijuana
Honduran migrant Ariel, 19, who is waiting for his court hearing for asylum seekers returned to Mexico to wait out their legal proceedings under a new policy change by the U.S. government, is pictured after an interview with Reuters in Tijuana, Mexico March 18, 2019. Picture taken March 18, 2019. REUTERS/Jorge Duenes

March 19, 2019

By Lizbeth Diaz and Mica Rosenberg

TIJUANA/NEW YORK (Reuters) – A group of asylum seekers sent back to Mexico was set to cross the border on Tuesday for their first hearings in U.S. immigration court in an early test of a controversial new policy from the Trump administration.

The U.S. program, known as the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), turns people seeking protection in the United States around to wait out their U.S. court proceedings in Mexican border towns. Some 240 people – including families – have been returned since late January, according to U.S. officials.

Court officials in San Diego referred questions about the number of hearings being held on Tuesday to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which did not respond to a request for comment. But attorneys representing a handful of clients were preparing to appear in court.

Migrants like 19-year-old Ariel, who said he left Honduras because of gang death threats against himself and his family, were preparing to line up at the San Ysidro port of entry first thing Tuesday morning.

Ariel, who asked to use only his middle name because of fears of reprisals in his home country, was among the first group of asylum-seeking migrants sent back to Mexico on Jan. 30 and given a notice to appear in U.S. court in San Diego.

“God willing everything will move ahead and I will be able to prove that if I am sent back to Honduras, I’ll be killed,” Ariel said.

While awaiting his U.S. hearing, Ariel said he was unable to get a legal work permit in Mexico but found a job as a restaurant busboy in Tijuana, which does not pay him enough to move out of a shelter.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and other advocacy groups are suing in federal court to halt the MPP program, which is part of a series of measures the administration of President Donald Trump has taken to try to curb the flow of mostly Central American migrants trying to enter the United States.

The Trump administration says most asylum claims, especially for Central Americans, are ultimately rejected, but because of crushing immigration court backlogs people are often released pending resolution of their cases and live in the United States for years. The government has said the new program is aimed at ending “the exploitation of our generous immigration laws.”

Critics of the program say it violates U.S. law and international norms since migrants are sent back to often dangerous towns in Mexico in precarious living situations where it is difficult to get notice about changes to U.S. court dates and to find legal help.

Immigration advocates are closely watching how the proceedings will be carried out this week, especially after scheduling glitches created confusion around three hearings last week, according to a report in the San Diego Union Tribune.

The Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), which runs U.S. immigration courts under the Department of Justice, said only that it uses its regular court scheduling system for the MPP hearings and did not respond to a question about the reported scheduling problems.

Gregory Chen, director of government relations at the American Immigration Lawyers Association, said there are real concerns about the difficulties of carrying out this major shift in U.S. immigration policy.

“The government did not have its shoes tied when they introduced this program,” he said.

(Reporting by Lizbeth Diaz in Tijuana and Mica Rosenberg in New York; Editing by Bill Trott)

Source: OANN

An aircraft engine being built at Honeywell Aerospace in Phoenix
FILE PHOTO: A worker is seen building an aircraft engine at Honeywell Aerospace in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S. on September 6, 2016. REUTERS/Alwyn Scott

March 19, 2019

WASHINGTON, (Reuters) – New orders for U.S.-made goods rose less than expected in January, held back by decreases in orders for computers and electronic products, in another indication of slowing manufacturing activity.

Factory goods orders edged up 0.1 percent, the Commerce Department said on Tuesday, as demand for primary metals and fabricated metal products fell. That followed an unrevised 0.1 percent gain in December.

Economists polled by Reuters had forecast factory orders rising 0.3 percent in January. Factory orders increased 3.8 percent compared to January 2018.

The release of the report was delayed by a 35-day partial shutdown of the federal government that ended on Jan. 25.

Reports last Friday showed manufacturing output fell for a second straight month in February and factory activity in New York state hit nearly a two-year low this month.

Manufacturing, which accounts for about 12 percent of the economy, is losing momentum as the stimulus from last year’s $1.5 trillion tax cut package fades. Activity is also being crimped by a trade war between the United States and China as well as by last year’s surge in the dollar and softening global economic growth, which are hurting exports.

In January, orders for machinery rose 1.5 percent after falling 0.4 percent in December. Orders for mining, oil field and gas field machinery fell 2.7 percent after tumbling 8.2 percent in December.

Orders for electrical equipment, appliances and components rebounded 1.4 percent after dropping 0.3 percent in December. Computers and electronic products orders fell 0.9 percent after decreasing 0.4 percent in December.

Orders for primary metals declined 2.0 percent and fabricated metal products orders fell 0.6 percent. Transportation equipment orders increased 1.2 percent in January, slowing from the prior month’s 3.2 percent rise.

Orders for civilian aircraft and parts increased 15.6 percent in January. Motor vehicles and parts orders gained 0.4 percent.

The Commerce Department also said January orders for non-defense capital goods excluding aircraft, which are seen as a measure of business spending plans on equipment, rose 0.8 percent as reported last week. Orders for these so-called core capital goods dropped 0.8 percent in December.

Shipments of core capital goods, which are used to calculate business equipment spending in the gross domestic product report, also increased 0.8 percent in January as previously reported. Core capital goods shipments edged up 0.1 percent in December.

(Reporting By Lucia Mutikani; Editing by Andrea Ricci)

Source: OANN

Betsy Rothstein | Reporter

Stanley Singleton feels so small and stupid right now.

As well he might Tuesday morning after reaching out to ABC News Chief Meteorologist Ginger Zee to tell that what she wore on today’s “Good Morning America” makes her she look like a “bimbo.”

He says his intention was to compliment her.

Gee rained down hard on Singleton, letting him have it. But not too meanly, considering.

Some 57 minutes later, Singleton apparently saw the light and realized that his so-called complimentary tweet went over like a lead balloon. He apologized. Oh, if not for the Twitter mob that will let you know when you’ve screwed up, where would he be?

Stanley apologized and called himself stupid.

Viewers quickly sided with Zee.

“I wouldn’t even reply to these morons!! You do a Fantastic job…that’s all that matters!!” wrote Ann McIver.

Another female viewer sharply told Stanley, “Women are not here to be your eye candy!”

He agreed. “I deserve to be dumped on for being stupid at this moment,” he replied.

“So rude,” wrote Bobbie.

Again, he agreed,

“Rude and stupid,” Stanley replied.

Another woman told him that his penance  should spending the rest of the week “propping up every woman you can instead of tearing them down.”

Stanley flogged himself again.

“I said something stupid and need to be seen as stupid right now,” he said.

“Shame on you,” replied Chrissy Chris.

Stanley: “Yes, I am stupid right now.”

Zee was pretty kind to Stanley, considering his boneheadedness.

“No worries,” she replied. “I understand, but wanted to use the comment to start an important conversation. I agree that a professional wardrobe is critical but I believe I have that.”

Another viewer told her that teal happens to be the color people wear to promote awareness for ovarian cancer. It’s called Teal Tuesday. She said the color of Zee’s skirt was close enough.

Source: The Daily Caller

Rep. David Cicilline, D-R.I., is urging the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Facebook for violating antitrust laws.

Cicilline’s comments came in a column posted by The New York Times on Tuesday.

“A year ago, the world learned that Facebook allowed a political consulting company called Cambridge Analytica to exploit the personal information of up to 87 million users, to obtain data that would help the company’s clients “fight a culture war” in America,” he said.

“Since then, a torrent of reports has revealed that the Cambridge Analytica scandal was part of a much broader pattern of misconduct by Facebook.”

And, he claimed Facebook also has “engaged in campaigns to obstruct congressional oversight to smear and discredit critics.”

Cicilline noted that after each incident becomes public, Facebook alternates between “denial, hollow promises and apology campaigns.”

But he maintained nothing seems to change.

“That’s why, as chairman of the House Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law, I am calling for an investigation into whether Facebook’s conduct has violated antitrust laws” he said.

Cicilline maintained reports also indicate a “disturbing pattern of anticompetitive conduct” on the part of Facebook.

And he said how the FTC responds to “repeated abuses” by Facebook will determine whether it is willing to protect consumers.

“It’s clear that serious enforcement is long overdue,” he said.

Source: NewsMax Politics

David Hookstead | Reporter

Free agent receiver Jordy Nelson has no shortage of suitors.

Nelson was cut from the Oakland Raiders after they paid him $3 million, and it doesn’t sound like he’ll be out of a job for long. According to Adam Schefter, the former Packers star will visit the Seahawks on Tuesday. The Patriots, Titans, Chiefs and Raiders are also all reportedly interested.

Yes, the Raiders, the team that just cut him after paying him might want him back. What a bizarre situation. Notably, the Packers aren’t on the list. (RELATED: Packers QB Aaron Rodgers Says He Won’t Get Surgery On His Knee)

The Seahawks and Nelson could be a great fit. Russell Wilson needs a dependable receiver, and that’s exactly what the former Packers star can be.

He might not be the star he once was, but he’s still a workhorse of a dude. The Seahawks would be incredibly wise to get him as quickly as possible.

The exact same can be said of the Patriots. Tom Brady has the rare ability of squeezing the most out of everybody around him, and we all know New England is a premium destination for veterans searching for a ring.

Nelson would probably flourish under Bill Belichick and Tom Brady. He would provide a legit receiving threat to go along with Edelman.

It is a little surprising to see the Packers not on the list. You’d think Aaron Rodgers would absolutely want his former star back.

I guess not. It looks like Nelson will have to get paid elsewhere.

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Source: The Daily Caller

William Davis | Contributor

Actor Bruce Willis was born Mar. 19, 1955, in Oberstein, Germany.

Willis turned 64-years-old on Tuesday. Willis is best known for his role in the 1988 classic Christmas film “Die Hard.” (RELATED: Bruce Willis’ Film ‘Air Strike’ Axed After Co-Star Disappears)

NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 05: Actor Bruce Willis attends the 2017 Room To Grow Spring Benefit at Guastavino's on April 5, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Noam Galai/WireImage)

Actor Bruce Willis attends the 2017 Room To Grow Spring Benefit … (Photo by Noam Galai/WireImage)

Die Hard is one of the greatest movies of all time and a perfect one to pull out of your cabinet during the Christmas season. It’s a shame that Willis’ birthday doesn’t fall around the holidays, because there would be no better way to celebrate than turning on this classic film. (RELATED: Celebrate Bruce Willis’ Birthday With His Top 10 Movies Of All Time [Video])

Even though it’s only March, It’s still a great flick to watch anytime, but it’s hardly the only classic film Willis has ever made. The award-winning actor has also starred in other classics such as “Pulp Fiction,” and “The Sixth Sense.”

Bruce Willis Die Hard (Photo: YouTube Screenshot)

Bruce Willis Die Hard (Photo: YouTube Screenshot)

He was awarded a Golden Globe for Best Actor – Television Series Musical or Comedy in 1987 for his role in “Moonlighting”; a People’s Choice Award for Actor in a New TV Series in 1986 for his role in “Moonlighting”; and another People’s Choice Award for Favorite Motion Picture Star In A Drama in 2000 for his role in “The Sixth Sense” among many others.

Willis is one of the greatest actors in American history, and we all wish him the happiest of birthdays.

Follow William Davis on Twitter

Source: The Daily Caller

Michael Bastasch | Energy Editor

  • Activists are blaming global warming for historic flooding in the Midwest, however, the science behind their claim is weak and not in line with the latest National Climate Assessment.
  • Hundreds of homes are inundated with water and at least three people have been killed in floods.
  • Thousands of people across four states were forced to evacuate because river flooding breached nearly 200 miles of levees.

Some environmentalists and scientists are blaming global warming for the historic flooding across the Midwest, adding to the long list of disasters eager activists link to climate change.

But is the scientific connection between historic Midwest floods and global warming very strong? No, it’s not.

A “bomb cyclone” led to sudden, devastating floods across the Midwest and Great Plains that left at least three people dead, according to reports. Officials say it’s the worst flooding in 50 years.

While most in the media largely stayed away from connecting Midwest flooding to climate change, environmentalists were quick to make the connection, claiming the science was on their side.

Bill McKibben, a prominent environmentalist who made headlines protesting the Keystone XL oil pipeline, proclaimed “[s]cientists confirm climate change” was at work in the historic Midwest flooding.

An aerial view of the flooding at the Camp Ashland in Nebraska

Flooded Camp Ashland, Army National Guard facility, is seen in this aerial photo taken in Ashland, Nebraska, U.S., March 17, 2019. Picture taken March 17, 2019. Courtesy Herschel Talley/Nebraska National Guard/Handout via REUTERS.

The article McKibben linked to, however, only mentions a “changing climate” once, but does discuss the myriad of other, likely more important factors, that contributed to the massive flooding, like rainfall piling up over frozen ground. (RELATED: DC Opens Door To Private Investors Financing Its Climate Change Case Against Exxon, Lawyer Says)

The liberal blog ThinkProgress claimed Midwest floods were a “terrifying preview of climate impacts to come,” though the article relied heavily on comment from environmental activists.

“This level of flooding is becoming the new normal,” John Hickey, Sierra Club’s Missouri chapter director, told ThinkProgress.

Other environmental activists attacked major media outlets, like The New York Times and The Washington Post, for not linking Midwest flooding to global warming.

Environmental policy experts were quick to point out the lack of science behind such claims.

An aerial view of Spencer Dam after a storm triggered historic flooding, near Bristow, Nebraska

An aerial view of Spencer Dam after a storm triggered historic flooding, near Bristow, Nebraska, U.S. March 16, 2019. Office of Governor Pete Ricketts/Handout via REUTERS.

The 2018 National Climate Assessment (NCA) found that “formal attribution approaches have not established a significant connection of increased riverine flooding to human-induced climate change.”

Likewise, the NCA noted that “a variety of other compounding factors, including local land use, land-cover changes, and water management also play important roles.”

Land-cover was an extremely important factor in the Midwest floods. Heavy rain fell onto snow-covered, frozen ground. Rain and snowmelt ran off into already ice-covered rivers, which rose and sent massive chunks of ice downstream, breaking infrastructure and damming up the river.

More than 70 cities across Nebraska declared emergencies amid historic floods. Thousands of people across four states were forced to evacuate because river flooding breached nearly 200 miles of levees, CBS News reported.

The Mississippi and Missouri rivers also saw widespread flooding. Residents in western Illinois saw the worst floods in 50 years, according to The Chicago Tribune. Many homes in Holt County, Missouri were sitting in up to 7 feet of water from river flooding, The Associated Press reported.

Flooded apartments are seen over Elkhorn River after a storm triggered historic flooding in Nebraska

Flooded apartments are seen over Elkhorn River after a storm triggered historic flooding in Nebraska, U.S. March 16, 2019. Office of Governor Pete Ricketts/Handout via REUTERS.

Oddly enough, the Nebraska-based Omaha World-Herald got comments from two scientists who gave rather broad statements on the connection between global warming and extreme rainfall.

Former NASA climate scientist James Hansen said “the strongest storms are getting stronger with global warming” because warmer air has more moisture. Penn State University climate scientist Michael Mann, creator of the controversial “hockey stick graph,” told the World-Herald that some studies show factors behind “bomb cyclones” are increasing due to climate change.

“There is evidence now in modeling studies that climate change is increasing these factors, supporting the development of more intense bomb cyclones and Nor’easters, packing tropical storm-scale winds and dumping huge amounts of precipitation (often in the form of huge snowfalls),” Mann said.

However, atmospheric scientist Ryan Maue shot back, saying that Hansen and Mann were giving generalized explanations of modeled climate impacts instead of gathering actual data on the flood event.

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Source: The Daily Caller

David Hookstead | Reporter

Golden State Warriors star Steph Curry behaved like a child Monday night in a loss to the San Antonio Spurs.

Curry behaved like a spoiled brat when he was called for a foul at the end of the third quarter. He ran around the court, yelled at the refs and resembled a kid on prom night who has been told to drink a little less and doesn’t take it well.

It was not at all what you’d expect to see out of a generally composed NBA star. Watch his pathetic antics below.

Imagine being a full-grown man, and behaving like that in front of the whole country. Hell, you shouldn’t behave like that if you’re in private.

You damn sure shouldn’t do it in front of TV cameras. It’s not like that was a bad call, either. It might not have been great, but it’s fair to say there was some contact there. (RELATED: Warriors Star Steph Curry Suffers Humiliating Fall During Dunk Attempt)

Why that reaction was necessary, we might never know.

Curry should take a long look in the mirror, and ask himself if that behavior is the standard we expect out of some of the best athletes in the world.

He’s out there acting like he just got accused of murder. Give it a rest. It’s one foul call in one game, and it was probably the right call.

Source: The Daily Caller


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