Apple

Workers are seen near the booth of Huawei Technologies Co under construction at the venue of China International Big Data Industry Expo in Guiyang
Workers are seen near the booth of Huawei Technologies Co under construction at the venue of China International Big Data Industry Expo in Guiyang, Guizhou province, China May 22, 2019. Picture taken May 22, 2019. REUTERS/Stringer

May 24, 2019

By Sijia Jiang and Josh Horwitz

HONG KONG/SHANGHAI (Reuters) – China’s Huawei, hit by crippling U.S. sanctions, could see shipments decline by as much as a quarter this year and faces the possibility that its smartphones will disappear from international markets, analysts said.

Smartphone shipments at Huawei, the world’s second-largest smartphone maker by volume, could tumble between 4% and 24% in 2019 if the ban stays put, according to Fubon Research and Strategy Analytics.

Several experts said they expect Huawei’s shipments to slide over the next six months but declined to give a hard estimate due to uncertainties surrounding the ban.

The U.S. Commerce Department blocked Huawei from buying U.S. goods last week amid its escalating trade spat with China.

The ban applies to goods and services with 25% or more of U.S.-originated technology or materials, and may, therefore, affect non-American firms.

Tech companies including Google and SoftBank Group-owned chip designer ARM have said they will cease supplies and updates to Huawei.

“Huawei may be wiped out of the Western European smartphone market next year if it loses access to Google,” said Linda Sui, director of wireless smartphone strategies at Strategy Analytics.

She predicts Huawei handset shipments will decline another 23% next year but believes the company could survive on the sheer size of the China market.

Fubon Research, which previously forecast Huawei would ship 258 million smartphones in 2019, now expects the company to ship just 200 million in a worst-case scenario.

Huawei commands nearly 30% of the global market according to industry tracker IDC, and shipped 208 million phones last year, including half to markets outside China. The company counts Europe as the most important market for its premium smartphones.

WHO WINS?

Huawei has said it has been developing the technology it needs to be self-sufficient for years.

But experts are not buying the company’s claim.

They said key components and intellectual property needed in Huawei’s devices are not available outside the United States.

Huawei would potentially need to lay off thousands of people and “disappear as a global player for some time,” said Stewart Randall, who tracks the chip industry at Shanghai-based consultancy Intralink.

Potential buyers of Huawei’s phones are likely to switch to high-end devices from Samsung Electronics and Apple Inc, and also buy mid-end phones from domestic rivals OPPO and Vivo, analysts said.

“It leaves an amount of share in its wake that can get picked up by competitors, particularly Samsung given its strength in regions like Europe,” said Bryan Ma, who researches the global smartphone market at IDC.

Huawei handsets are already drawing fewer clicks from online shoppers since the United States blacklisted the company, according to PriceSpy, a product comparison site that attracts an average of 14 million visitors per month.

“Over the last four days, Huawei handsets have slumped in popularity – receiving almost half as many clicks as they did last week in the UK and 26% less on the global stage,” PriceSpy said.

The export ban on Huawei could also delay China’s 5G rollout, Jefferies analyst Edison Lee said. Huawei has said it signed 5G contracts with 40 clients around the world.

(Reporting by Sijia Jiang in HONG KONG and Josh Horwitz in Shanghai; Writing by Sayantani Ghosh; editing by Louise Heavens)

Source: OANN

Traders work on the floor at the NYSE in New York
Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., May 23, 2019. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

May 24, 2019

By Shreyashi Sanyal

(Reuters) – U.S. stock index futures edged higher on Friday, attempting to bounce back from the previous session’s steep sell-off, on cautious optimism after President Donald Trump predicted a swift end to the ongoing tariff war with China.

Trump said on Thursday that complaints against Huawei Technologies Co Ltd might be resolved within the framework of a U.S.-China trade deal.

However, no high-level talks have been scheduled between the two countries since the last round of negotiations in Washington two weeks ago. Trump will meet his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping at the G20 meeting next month in Japan.

Earlier this week, while Washington temporarily relaxed its ban on Huawei, there were reports that it was planning a similar ban on another Chinese firm, making investors worry that such moves would have lasting effects on the global technology supply chain.

In the previous session, the S&P 500 technology and industrials sectors closed 1.5% lower.

Technology giants Apple Inc and Microsoft Corp rose about 1% in premarket trading, while industrial bellwethers Boeing Co and 3M Co gained over 1%.

Reuters reported the Federal Aviation Administration expects to approve Boeing’s 737 MAX jet to return to service as soon as late June.

At 7:20 a.m. ET, Dow e-minis were up 171 points, or 0.67%. S&P 500 e-minis were up 18.25 points, or 0.65% and Nasdaq 100 e-minis were up 43.25 points, or 0.59%.

The daily exchanges between the United States and China have kept investors on edge, putting the S&P 500 index on track to post its biggest monthly decline since the December sell-off.

Following a sell-off on Thursday, the S&P 500 is now 4.7% off its all-time high hit on May 1.

Among other stocks, Foot Locker Inc dropped 6.7% after the footwear retailer missed quarterly profit and same-store sales estimates.

Autodesk Inc fell 7.4% after the software maker reported quarterly earnings below expectations.

Total System Services Inc jumped 6.4% after Bloomberg reported Global Payments Inc has held preliminary tie-up talks with the payment solutions provider. Global Payments’ shares rose 1.4%.

On the macro front, a U.S. Commerce Department report is likely to show April durable goods declined 2%, after a 2.6% rise in March. The data is due at 8:30 a.m. ET.

(Reporting by Shreyashi Sanyal in Bengaluru; Editing by Arun Koyyur)

Source: OANN

President Donald Trump is delivering $16 billion more in aid to farmers hurt by his trade policies, an effort to relieve the economic pain among his supporters in rural America.

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said the first of three payments is likely to be made in July or August and suggested that U.S. negotiators may be weeks away from settling a bitter trade dispute with China.

The latest bailout comes atop $11 billion in aid Trump provided farmers last year.

Trump, seeking to reduce America’s trade deficit with the rest of the world and with China in particular, has imposed import taxes on foreign steel, aluminum, solar panels and dishwashers and on thousands of Chinese products.

U.S trading partners have lashed back with retaliatory tariffs of their own, focusing on U.S. agricultural products in a direct shot at the American heartland, where support for Trump runs high.

“The package we’re announcing today will ensure that farmers will not bear the brunt of those trade actions,” Perdue said.

Financial markets buckled Thursday on heightened tensions between the U.S. and China. The Dow Jones industrial average was down more than 400 points in mid-day trading.

U.S. crude plunged 6 percent on fears that the trade standoff could knock the global economy out of kilter and kill demand for energy.

Talks between the world’s two biggest economies broke off earlier this month with no resolution to a dispute over Beijing’s aggressive efforts to challenge American technological dominance. The U.S. charges that China is stealing technology, unfairly subsidizing its own companies and forcing U.S. companies to hand over trade secrets if they want access to the Chinese market.

Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping are expected to discuss the standoff at a meeting of the Group of 20 major economies in Osaka, Japan, next month.

But briefing reporters on the farm aid package, Perdue said he doubted that “a trade deal could be consummated before” the first payments to farmers in July or August.

In Beijing, China held the door open to resuming talks in the tariff war with Washington on Thursday, but lashed out at limits on access to key technologies that it said might hurt global supply chains.

Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang said China hopes to restart the talks that broke down earlier this month after the U.S. hiked tariffs on $250 billion in Chinese imports, but only if the conditions are deemed fair.

“China is open to the door of dialogue, but sincerity is indispensable to make a consultation meaningful,” Lu said at regularly scheduled briefing. “A mutually beneficial agreement must be based on mutual respect, equality and mutual benefit.”

Seeking to rally support for its side in the tariff war, Beijing is vehemently protesting the Trump administration’s decision last week to impose controls on exports of computer chips and other key components.

The move, mainly aimed at telecom equipment maker Huawei and other Chinese high-tech companies, will hinder global cooperation in science and technology and has “harmed the vital interests of relevant enterprises and countries,” Lu said.

A spokesman for China’s Commerce Ministry said Washington was “using American national power to suppress Chinese companies.”

This “not only seriously disrupts regular business cooperation between the sides’ enterprises, but also seriously threatens the security of the global industrial supply chain,” the spokesman, Gao Feng, told reporters.

The Trump administration has singled out Huawei, accusing it of posing a security threat. As a result, U.S. allies and their companies increasingly have put cooperation with the company on hold.

On Wednesday, Britain’s EE and Vodafone and Japan’s KDDI and Y! Mobile said they were holding off on the launch of Huawei smartphones, including some that can be used on next generation mobile networks, amid uncertainty about the devices from the world’s No. 2 smartphone maker.

As the trade dispute drags on, battering Chinese manufacturers and raising uncertainty for investors, Beijing has stepped up efforts to sway opinion in its favor both at home and abroad.

That extends even to neighboring countries whose economies are unlikely to be much affected by friction between Beijing and Washington.

Speaking to members of the eight-nation Shanghai Cooperation Organization at a meeting in Kyrgyzstan, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi vowed to match “extreme pressure” from the U.S. with its own measures.

The trade frictions have “aroused great concern from the international community,” Wang said. “I stress to everyone that China’s actions are not just about preserving our own legitimate rights and interests but also to maintain the norms of international relations and safeguard the international free trading system.”

Wang, whose comments Wednesday were posted on the Foreign Ministry’s website, said representatives of the group had expressed “broad support” for China’s position.

A security-oriented group dominated by Moscow and Beijing, the Shanghai Cooperation Organization also includes Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, India and Pakistan and several observer states and “dialogue partners.”

Beijing has already responded to Trump’s tariff hikes on $250 billion of Chinese imports by slapping penalties on $110 billion of American goods. Based on last year’s trade, that leaves about $45 billion in imports from the U.S.

They include semiconductors and other critical inputs needed by fledgling Chinese tech industries.

So far, Beijing has sought to win sympathy and support by burnishing its credentials as a rules-abiding member of the World Trade Organization.

China has hinted it could also leverage its role as the main global supplier of rare earths used in smartphones, lightweight magnets, batteries and other components to slap back. It could also target Apple and other companies that rely on Chinese manufacturing and sales.

Source: NewsMax Politics

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Police from the Alhambra and West Covina Police Departments arrested Manuel Gallardo, 55, of Apple Valley and Daniel Gonzalez, 21, of Ontario, California. The arrests came during a raid on an Apple Valley auto body repair shop on May 15. The rais also resulted in the discovery of 500 pounds of methamphetamine, the seizure of 11 firearms, $38,000 dollars, and 40 grams of fentanyl. The raid grew out of a two-month multi-agency drug investigation.

Officials said both suspects are believed to be members of a Sinaloa Cartel-connected U.S.-based drug ring. The two men are charged with possession of methamphetamine with the intent to sell, transport for sale purposes, and possession of methamphetamine while in possession of a firearm. Apple Valley is located in the Victor Valley of San Bernardino County — approximately 90 miles northeast of Los Angeles, California.

Read More:
https://www.breitbart.com/border/2019/05/19/sinaloa-cartel-linked-meth-ring-busted-in-california/?fbclid=IwAR2HBH_Hm7re6HD0g24qrzX2QtTYbCL-JthOtaUgiUtE9MVFbRLk9wK7A54

Image Credit: Alhambra Police Department

FILE PHOTO: Women walk past a Huawei P30 advertising LED board at a shopping centre in Bangkok
FILE PHOTO: Women walk past a Huawei P30 advertising LED board at a shopping centre in Bangkok, Thailand May 22, 2019. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun/File Photo

May 22, 2019

By Paul Sandle

LONDON (Reuters) – British chip designer ARM has halted relations with Huawei [HWT.L] in order to comply with a United States blockade of the company, potentially crippling the Chinese company’s ability to make new chips for its future smartphones.

Huawei, in common with Apple and chipmakers such as Qualcomm, uses ARM blueprints to design the processors that power its smartphones. It also licenses graphics technology from the Cambridge-based company.

“ARM is complying with all of the latest regulations set forth by the U.S. government,” an ARM spokesman said in a statement. “No further comment at this time.”

Huawei said it valued its close relationships with its partners, but it recognized the pressure some of them are under “as a result of politically motivated decisions”.

“We are confident this regrettable situation can be resolved and our priority remains to continue to deliver world-class technology and products to our customers around the world,” a spokesman said.

The United States blocked Huawei from buying U.S. goods last week, jeopardizing ties with Google, which provides the Android operating system and services like Gmail and Google Maps, as well as hardware partners such as ARM.

It temporarily eased restrictions on Huawei on Tuesday, granting it a license to buy U.S. goods until Aug. 19, meaning that updates of Google apps can continue until then.

The BBC reported earlier on Wednesday that ARM, which is owned by Japan’s Softbank, had instructed employees to halt “all active contracts, support entitlements, and any pending engagements” with Huawei after the United States added Huawei to a list of companies with which U.S. firms could not do business.

ARM said in an internal company memo that its designs contained technology of U.S. origin, the BBC reported.

It told staff they were no longer allowed to “provide support, delivery technology (whether software, code, or other updates), engage in technical discussions, or otherwise discuss technical matters” with Huawei, according to the memo seen by the BBC.

Huawei’s international partners are moving to distance themselves from the Chinese company until there is clarity over its relationship with U.S. technology partners that provide the apps and services that are crucial for consumers.

British mobile operators EE and Vodafone both said on Wednesday they had dropped Huawei smartphones from the imminent launch range of their 5G networks.

(Reporting by Michael Holden and Paul Sandle; Editing by Mark Potter and Louise Heavens)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: An illuminated Google logo is seen inside an office building in Zurich
FILE PHOTO: An illuminated Google logo is seen inside an office building in Zurich, Switzerland December 5, 2018. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann/File Photo

May 22, 2019

DUBLIN (Reuters) – Google’s lead regulator in the European Union, Ireland’s Data Protection Commissioner, opened its first investigation into the U.S. internet giant on Wednesday over how it handles personal data for the purpose of advertising.

The probe was the result of a number of submissions against the company, the Irish Data Protection Commissioner said, including from privacy-focused web browser Brave which complained last year that Google and other digital advertising firms were playing fast and loose with people’s data.

Brave argued that when a person visits a website, intimate personal data that describes them and what they are doing online is broadcast to tens or hundreds of companies without their knowledge in order to auction and place targeted adverts.

“A statutory inquiry pursuant to section 110 of the Data Protection Act 2018 has been commenced in respect of Google Ireland Limited’s processing of personal data in the context of its online Ad Exchange,” the Irish DPC said in a statement.

It said the enquiry would establish whether processing of personal data carried out at each stage of an advertising transaction was in compliance with the landmark European GDPR privacy law introduced a year ago.

That would include considering the lawful basis for processing, the principles of transparency and data minimization, as well as Google’s retention practices, it added.

Many of the large technology firms have their European headquarters in Ireland, putting them under the watch of the Irish DPC.

The regulator said earlier this month that it had 51 large-scale investigations under way, 17 of which related to large technology firms including Twitter, LinkedIn, Apple and a number into Facebook and its WhatsApp and Instagram subsidiaries.

Under the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), regulators have the power to impose fines for violations of up to 4% of a company’s global revenue or 20 million euros, whichever is higher.

GDPR seeks to ensure that individuals have greater control over the data that companies hold about them, prompting the complaints from Brave, set up by Silicon Valley engineering guru and Mozilla co-founder Brendan Eich, and others last September.

Google said at the time that it had already implemented strong privacy protections in consultation with European regulators and is committed to complying with the GDPR.

The probe could become a test case into the foundations of the data-driven model the online ad industry depends on.

“The Irish Data Protection Commission’s action signals that now – nearly one year after the GDPR was introduced – a change is coming that goes beyond just Google,” Brave’s chief policy officer Johnny Ryan said in a statement on Wednesday.

(Reporting by Padraic Halpin; Editing by Kirsten Donovan)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: An illuminated Google logo is seen inside an office building in Zurich
FILE PHOTO: An illuminated Google logo is seen inside an office building in Zurich, Switzerland December 5, 2018. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann/File Photo

May 22, 2019

DUBLIN (Reuters) – Google’s lead regulator in the European Union, Ireland’s Data Protection Commissioner, opened its first investigation into the U.S. internet giant on Wednesday over how it handles personal data for the purpose of advertising.

The probe was the result of a number of submissions against the company, the Irish Data Protection Commissioner said, including from privacy-focused web browser Brave which complained last year that Google and other digital advertising firms were playing fast and loose with people’s data.

Brave argued that when a person visits a website, intimate personal data that describes them and what they are doing online is broadcast to tens or hundreds of companies without their knowledge in order to auction and place targeted adverts.

“A statutory inquiry pursuant to section 110 of the Data Protection Act 2018 has been commenced in respect of Google Ireland Limited’s processing of personal data in the context of its online Ad Exchange,” the Irish DPC said in a statement.

It said the enquiry would establish whether processing of personal data carried out at each stage of an advertising transaction was in compliance with the landmark European GDPR privacy law introduced a year ago.

That would include considering the lawful basis for processing, the principles of transparency and data minimization, as well as Google’s retention practices, it added.

Many of the large technology firms have their European headquarters in Ireland, putting them under the watch of the Irish DPC.

The regulator said earlier this month that it had 51 large-scale investigations under way, 17 of which related to large technology firms including Twitter, LinkedIn, Apple and a number into Facebook and its WhatsApp and Instagram subsidiaries.

Under the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), regulators have the power to impose fines for violations of up to 4% of a company’s global revenue or 20 million euros, whichever is higher.

GDPR seeks to ensure that individuals have greater control over the data that companies hold about them, prompting the complaints from Brave, set up by Silicon Valley engineering guru and Mozilla co-founder Brendan Eich, and others last September.

Google said at the time that it had already implemented strong privacy protections in consultation with European regulators and is committed to complying with the GDPR.

The probe could become a test case into the foundations of the data-driven model the online ad industry depends on.

“The Irish Data Protection Commission’s action signals that now – nearly one year after the GDPR was introduced – a change is coming that goes beyond just Google,” Brave’s chief policy officer Johnny Ryan said in a statement on Wednesday.

(Reporting by Padraic Halpin; Editing by Kirsten Donovan)

Source: OANN

Apple company logos are reflected on the glass window outside an Apple store in Shanghai
Apple company logos are reflected on the glass window outside an Apple store in Shanghai, China January 3, 2019. REUTERS/Aly Song

May 22, 2019

(Reuters) – Apple Inc’s browser engine Webkit said https://webkit.org/blog/8943/privacy-preserving-ad-click-attribution-for-the-web on Wednesday it will launch a new technology to track ad clicks while preserving user privacy.

Earlier this month, Alphabet Inc’s Google said it will roll out a dashboard-like function in its Chrome browser to offer users more control in fending off tracking cookies, according to Wall Street Journal.

Apple’s step shows how increased public scrutiny is forcing greater transparency in Silicon Valley.

(Reporting by Sayanti Chakraborty in Bengaluru; Editing by Shinjini Ganguli)

Source: OANN

Apple company logos are reflected on the glass window outside an Apple store in Shanghai
Apple company logos are reflected on the glass window outside an Apple store in Shanghai, China January 3, 2019. REUTERS/Aly Song

May 22, 2019

(Reuters) – Apple Inc’s browser engine Webkit said https://webkit.org/blog/8943/privacy-preserving-ad-click-attribution-for-the-web on Wednesday it will launch a new technology to track ad clicks while preserving user privacy.

Earlier this month, Alphabet Inc’s Google said it will roll out a dashboard-like function in its Chrome browser to offer users more control in fending off tracking cookies, according to Wall Street Journal.

Apple’s step shows how increased public scrutiny is forcing greater transparency in Silicon Valley.

(Reporting by Sayanti Chakraborty in Bengaluru; Editing by Shinjini Ganguli)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg makes his keynote speech during Facebook Inc's annual F8 developers conference in San Jose
FILE PHOTO: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg makes his keynote speech during Facebook Inc’s annual F8 developers conference in San Jose, California, U.S., April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Stephen Lam/File Photo

May 22, 2019

By Foo Yun Chee

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – A landmark European privacy law is making waves worldwide a year after it came into force, fundamentally changing the way data are handled as Facebook, Apple and Google face increasingly frequent complaints.

Adopted on May 25 last year, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) aims to protect all EU citizens from privacy and data breaches, regardless of which part of the world the data handler is in.

The new regulation has forced global companies to reconsider their own rules, inspiring territories from Brazil to China and India to California to develop their own privacy and security regulations based on a de facto GDPR benchmark.

“GDPR has fundamentally changed Facebook as a company,” the world’s biggest social network said in an emailed statement, citing a range of improvements to users’ privacy controls it had implemented, along with additions to its compliance team.

In the wake of heightened awareness of data privacy, fueled by Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal in which personal data were harvested from millions of users without their consent, financial penalties and legal tests will now follow.

“It’s going to be a year where we see and test how the rules get interpreted,” said Cristina Cabella, IBM’s chief privacy officer, who oversees a team of dozens of lawyers worldwide for the technology multinational.

The Cambridge Analytica scandal, which erupted just before GDPR came into force, resulted in a paltry 500,000 pound ($632,000) fine in Britain – the maximum amount possible at the time.

But GDPR grants new powers to privacy enforcers to impose fines of up to 4 percent of global revenue or 20 million euros ($22 million), whichever is higher.

The biggest penalty so far, 50 million euros, has gone to Google for failing to properly secure users’ consent for personalized ads in France.

More may be on the way, with more than 95,000 complaints filed to national data enforcers, triggering 225 investigations.

Facebook, the target of seven investigations by the Irish data protection watchdog, could face its first sanction this summer. Its WhatsApp and Instagram subsidiaries are the focus of separate probes by Dublin.

Ireland, the lead regulator for the tech giants because their European headquarters are located there, is also investigating Twitter, Microsoft’s LinkedIn and Apple, with decisions in all the cases expected this year.

GDPR has succeeded in raising awareness of personal data among individuals and companies and how to protect it, said Benoit Van Asbroeck, a partner at law firm Bird & Bird.

“Everywhere people realize that data is a key asset,” he said.

The new rules can force companies to clean house, meaning they will be more effective in data retrieval and analytics as well as building consumer confidence, said IBM’s Cabella.

“Individuals can have more trust in the companies that process their data transparently, and that is a competitive advantage,” she told Reuters.

IMPEDING ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

There is a risk however that the rules could hamper Europe’s bid to lead in artificial intelligence, putting it at a disadvantage compared with the United States and Asia where the legal threshold is lower, Van Asbroeck said.

“Protection for people is too high. It will backfire for the development of artificial intelligence in the EU. To develop AI, you need to train algorithms with data. Some of this is personal data which needs to be compliant with GDPR, making it difficult for some companies,” he said.

Google, Facebook and Apple with their massive troves of user data and contractual consent to use it would not face any problem but the same cannot be said of other companies without the same access to volumes of information, he said.

U.S. think tank Information Technology and Innovation Foundation said there was a case for modifying GDPR.

“If the EU wants to thrive in the algorithmic economy, it needs to reform the GDPR, such as by expanding authorized uses of AI in the public interest, allowing re-purposing of data that poses only minimal risk, not penalizing automated decision-making,” it said.

VZBV, the federal umbrella for Germany’s consumer protection movement, said the right to data portability – which allows individuals to obtain and reuse their personal data for their own purposes across different services – should be clarified.

“We need industry-specific codes of conduct for data portability. Here companies have to agree on standards with data protection authorities and civil society,” said VZBV chief Klaus Mueller.

(Additional reporting by Georgina Prodhan and Paul Sandle in London, Doug Busvine in Frankfurt; Padraic Halpin in Dublin and Jonathan Weber in Singapore; Writing by Foo Yun Chee and Georgina Prodhan; Editing by Georgina Prodhan and Kirsten Donovan)

Source: OANN


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