attack

FILE PHOTO: Ali Wazir and Mohsin Dawar PTM leaders walk at the venue of the rally in Karachi
FILE PHOTO: Ali Wazir (L) and Mohsin Dawar, leaders of the Pashtun Tahaffuz Movement (PTM) walk at the venue of a rally against, what they say, are human rights violations by security forces, in Karachi, Pakistan May 13, 2018. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro/File Photo

May 26, 2019

By Jibran Ahmad and Drazen Jorgic

PESHAWAR/ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Reuters) – Pakistan’s army on Sunday accused two lawmakers critical of the military of playing a key role in a clash with troops at a security checkpost in which three people were killed, setting up a potential confrontation with a vast rights movement the two lawmakers helped to found.

Mohsin Dawar and Ali Wazir, parliamentarians for the volatile Waziristan region bordering Afghanistan, were among the founders of the Pashtun Tahaffuz Movement (PTM) civil rights group that has been a thorn in the side of the military with frequent sit-ins and rallies denouncing alleged military abuses.

PTM has been peaceful since its founding in early 2018 and has vowed not to respond with violence to frequent arrests and what it calls “humiliation” of its members, but some analysts have warned that some elements within PTM could turn violent if the state continued with its tough approach.

PTM’s support base is mostly among ethnic Pashtuns in the Khyber Pakhtunkwa region that is still scarred by a devastating decade-long Islamist insurgency and was led by the Tehrik-i Taliban Pakistan (TTP), also known as the Pakistani Taliban.

The army said Dawar and Wazir on Sunday led a group that “assaulted” a security checkpost near the North Waziristan town of Boyya, about 10 miles (16 km) from the Afghanistan border.

“They wanted to exert pressure for release of suspected terrorists’ facilitator arrested the other day,” the army said in a statement. “In exchange of fire three individuals who attacked the post lost their lives and 10 got injured.”

The military said five soldiers were also wounded in the attack, following which Wazir and eight others were detained. “Mohsin Javed (Dawar) is at large after inciting the crowd,” the army said.

Dawar and Wazir could not be reached for comment.

Sources in the so-called tribal regions bordering Afghanistan said phone and internet networks in the region have been shut down and curfew imposed.

They said Dawar and Wazir were planning to stage a sit-in along with PTM members to protest against the alleged abusive treatment of a Pakistani woman by the security forces.

Dawar told Voice of America’s (VOA) Pashto language radio service, Deewa, that about 30 people were wounded in the incident, including himself, and some were seriously injured.

Dawar said the security forces tried to stop protestors going through barricades and initially shot in the air but “then opened straight fire at us. Many our of people were injured,” Dawar told Deewa.

PTM, which was founded to protest against the death of a Pashtun man killed by police in the southern port of Karachi, regularly draws thousands of protesters to its demonstrations against state violence.

Its leaders have challenged the military in a way seldom openly done by Pakistani politicians, especially when discussing sensitive topics such as the military’s alleged links to Islamist militants and the army’s vast business empire.

(Writing by Drazen Jorgic)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: Ali Wazir and Mohsin Dawar PTM leaders walk at the venue of the rally in Karachi
FILE PHOTO: Ali Wazir (L) and Mohsin Dawar, leaders of the Pashtun Tahaffuz Movement (PTM) walk at the venue of a rally against, what they say, are human rights violations by security forces, in Karachi, Pakistan May 13, 2018. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro/File Photo

May 26, 2019

By Jibran Ahmad and Drazen Jorgic

PESHAWAR/ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Reuters) – Pakistan’s army on Sunday accused two lawmakers critical of the military of playing a key role in a clash with troops at a security checkpost in which three people were killed, setting up a potential confrontation with a vast rights movement the two lawmakers helped to found.

Mohsin Dawar and Ali Wazir, parliamentarians for the volatile Waziristan region bordering Afghanistan, were among the founders of the Pashtun Tahaffuz Movement (PTM) civil rights group that has been a thorn in the side of the military with frequent sit-ins and rallies denouncing alleged military abuses.

PTM has been peaceful since its founding in early 2018 and has vowed not to respond with violence to frequent arrests and what it calls “humiliation” of its members, but some analysts have warned that some elements within PTM could turn violent if the state continued with its tough approach.

PTM’s support base is mostly among ethnic Pashtuns in the Khyber Pakhtunkwa region that is still scarred by a devastating decade-long Islamist insurgency and was led by the Tehrik-i Taliban Pakistan (TTP), also known as the Pakistani Taliban.

The army said Dawar and Wazir on Sunday led a group that “assaulted” a security checkpost near the North Waziristan town of Boyya, about 10 miles (16 km) from the Afghanistan border.

“They wanted to exert pressure for release of suspected terrorists’ facilitator arrested the other day,” the army said in a statement. “In exchange of fire three individuals who attacked the post lost their lives and 10 got injured.”

The military said five soldiers were also wounded in the attack, following which Wazir and eight others were detained. “Mohsin Javed (Dawar) is at large after inciting the crowd,” the army said.

Dawar and Wazir could not be reached for comment.

Sources in the so-called tribal regions bordering Afghanistan said phone and internet networks in the region have been shut down and curfew imposed.

They said Dawar and Wazir were planning to stage a sit-in along with PTM members to protest against the alleged abusive treatment of a Pakistani woman by the security forces.

Dawar told Voice of America’s (VOA) Pashto language radio service, Deewa, that about 30 people were wounded in the incident, including himself, and some were seriously injured.

Dawar said the security forces tried to stop protestors going through barricades and initially shot in the air but “then opened straight fire at us. Many our of people were injured,” Dawar told Deewa.

PTM, which was founded to protest against the death of a Pashtun man killed by police in the southern port of Karachi, regularly draws thousands of protesters to its demonstrations against state violence.

Its leaders have challenged the military in a way seldom openly done by Pakistani politicians, especially when discussing sensitive topics such as the military’s alleged links to Islamist militants and the army’s vast business empire.

(Writing by Drazen Jorgic)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: Ali Wazir and Mohsin Dawar PTM leaders walk at the venue of the rally in Karachi
FILE PHOTO: Ali Wazir (L) and Mohsin Dawar, leaders of the Pashtun Tahaffuz Movement (PTM) walk at the venue of a rally against, what they say, are human rights violations by security forces, in Karachi, Pakistan May 13, 2018. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro/File Photo

May 26, 2019

By Jibran Ahmad and Drazen Jorgic

PESHAWAR/ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Reuters) – Pakistan’s army on Sunday accused two lawmakers critical of the military of playing a key role in a clash with troops at a security checkpost in which three people were killed, setting up a potential confrontation with a vast rights movement the two lawmakers helped to found.

Mohsin Dawar and Ali Wazir, parliamentarians for the volatile Waziristan region bordering Afghanistan, were among the founders of the Pashtun Tahaffuz Movement (PTM) civil rights group that has been a thorn in the side of the military with frequent sit-ins and rallies denouncing alleged military abuses.

PTM has been peaceful since its founding in early 2018 and has vowed not to respond with violence to frequent arrests and what it calls “humiliation” of its members, but some analysts have warned that some elements within PTM could turn violent if the state continued with its tough approach.

PTM’s support base is mostly among ethnic Pashtuns in the Khyber Pakhtunkwa region that is still scarred by a devastating decade-long Islamist insurgency and was led by the Tehrik-i Taliban Pakistan (TTP), also known as the Pakistani Taliban.

The army said Dawar and Wazir on Sunday led a group that “assaulted” a security checkpost near the North Waziristan town of Boyya, about 10 miles (16 km) from the Afghanistan border.

“They wanted to exert pressure for release of suspected terrorists’ facilitator arrested the other day,” the army said in a statement. “In exchange of fire three individuals who attacked the post lost their lives and 10 got injured.”

The military said five soldiers were also wounded in the attack, following which Wazir and eight others were detained. “Mohsin Javed (Dawar) is at large after inciting the crowd,” the army said.

Dawar and Wazir could not be reached for comment.

Sources in the so-called tribal regions bordering Afghanistan said phone and internet networks in the region have been shut down and curfew imposed.

They said Dawar and Wazir were planning to stage a sit-in along with PTM members to protest against the alleged abusive treatment of a Pakistani woman by the security forces.

Dawar told Voice of America’s (VOA) Pashto language radio service, Deewa, that about 30 people were wounded in the incident, including himself, and some were seriously injured.

Dawar said the security forces tried to stop protestors going through barricades and initially shot in the air but “then opened straight fire at us. Many our of people were injured,” Dawar told Deewa.

PTM, which was founded to protest against the death of a Pashtun man killed by police in the southern port of Karachi, regularly draws thousands of protesters to its demonstrations against state violence.

Its leaders have challenged the military in a way seldom openly done by Pakistani politicians, especially when discussing sensitive topics such as the military’s alleged links to Islamist militants and the army’s vast business empire.

(Writing by Drazen Jorgic)

Source: OANN

Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign stop in Philadelphia
Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during a campaign stop in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., May 18, 2019. REUTERS/Mark Makela

May 26, 2019

(Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un agree on their assessment of former Vice President Joe Biden, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said on Sunday.

North Korea’s state-run news agency issued a blistering attack last week on Biden, who has been critical of the reclusive communist state in the past.

“I think they agree in their assessment of former Vice President Joe Biden,” Sanders said of Trump and Kim. She was speaking from Japan during a state visit by Trump.

“The president doesn’t need somebody else to give him an assessment of Joe Biden. He’s given his own assessment a number of times.”

Trump, a Republican, referenced the criticism in a Twitter post on Saturday in which he mentioned Biden, a Democrat who is running for president, initially misspelling his name as Bidan and taking pleasure in the North Korean leader’s sharp rhetoric about a fellow American.

Trump said in a subsequent corrected tweet that he smiled when Kim “called Swampman Joe Biden a low IQ individual, & worse. Perhaps that’s sending me a signal?”

Trump on Sunday dismissed concerns about recent missile launches from North Korea and said he was confident that Kim would keep promises that he had made.

(Reporting by Doina Chiacu in Washington; Editing by Phil Berlowitz)

Source: OANN

Iranian Foreign Minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, speaks during a news conference with Iraqi Foreign Minister Mohamed Ali Alhakim in Baghdad
Iranian Foreign Minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, speaks during a news conference with Iraqi Foreign Minister Mohamed Ali Alhakim in Baghdad, Iraq May 26, 2019. REUTERS/Khalid Al-Mousily

May 26, 2019

By Ahmed Rasheed

BAGHDAD (Reuters) – Iranian will defend itself against any military or economic aggression, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said on Sunday, calling on European states to do more to preserve a nuclear agreement his country signed.

Speaking in a news conference in Baghdad with his Iraqi counterpart Mohammed al-Hakim, Zarif said his country wanted to build balanced relations with its Gulf Arab neighbours and that it had proposed signing a non-aggression pact with them.

“We will defend against any war efforts against Iran, whether it be an economic war or a military one, and we will face these efforts with strength,” he said.

Strains have increased between Iran and the United States, which is a firm backer of Tehran’s regional rival Saudi Arabia, after this month’s attack on oil tankers in the Gulf region that Washington has blamed on Iran.

Tehran has distanced itself from the bombings, but the United States has sent an aircraft carrier and an extra 1,500 troops to the Gulf, sparking concerns about the risks of conflict in a volatile region.

Iraq stands with Iran and is willing to act as an intermediary between its neighbour and the United States, Hakim said, adding that Baghdad does not believe an “economic blockade” is fruitful, a reference to U.S. sanctions.

“We are saying very clearly and honestly that we oppose the unilateral actions taken by the United States. We stand with the Islamic Republic of Iran in its position,” said Hakim. The United States and Iran are Iraq’s two main allies.

NUCLEAR REFERENDUM?

Washington has been seeking to tighten sanctions against Iran, as relations worsen under President Donald Trump, who last year pulled out of a nuclear agreement his predecessor Barack Obama had signed with Iran alongside other world powers in 2015.

In Tehran, President Hassan Rouhani floated the idea of holding a referendum over Iran’s nuclear programme, Iranian media reported.

A referendum over the controversial nuclear programme could give Iran’s leaders space to manoeuvre and a chance to resolve the standoff with the United States.

Top Iranian leaders have said they are not seeking war with the United States and officials speaking to Reuters from Tehran said last week that despite the sharpened rhetoric with Washington, authorities are trying to avoid an open conflict.

“Article 59 of the Constitution (referendum ) is a deadlock breaker … and could be a problem-solver at any junction,” the semi-official news agency ILNA quoted Rouhani as saying late on Saturday.

Rouhani said that, when he was a top nuclear negotiator in 2004, he had proposed holding a referendum on the nuclear issue to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

Iran has only held three referendums since its 1979 Islamic revolution — to approve the setting up of an Islamic Republic and then to approve and amend the constitution.

Washington says it has built up the U.S. military presence in the region, accusing Tehran of threats to U.S. troops and interests. Tehran has described U.S. moves as “psychological warfare” and a “political game”.

Separately, a deputy commander of Iran’s elite Revolutionary Guards said the U.S. military presence in the Middle East was at its “weakest in history” despite the talk of a build-up.

(Reporting by Ahmed Rasheed in Baghdad, additional reporting by Parisa Hafezi in Dubai and Dubai newsroom ; Writing by Ahmed Aboulenein; Editing by Keith Weir)

Source: OANN

Iranian Foreign Minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, speaks during a news conference with Iraqi Foreign Minister Mohamed Ali Alhakim in Baghdad
Iranian Foreign Minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, speaks during a news conference with Iraqi Foreign Minister Mohamed Ali Alhakim in Baghdad, Iraq May 26, 2019. REUTERS/Khalid Al-Mousily

May 26, 2019

By Ahmed Rasheed

BAGHDAD (Reuters) – Iranian will defend itself against any military or economic aggression, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said on Sunday, calling on European states to do more to preserve a nuclear agreement his country signed.

Speaking in a news conference in Baghdad with his Iraqi counterpart Mohammed al-Hakim, Zarif said his country wanted to build balanced relations with its Gulf Arab neighbours and that it had proposed signing a non-aggression pact with them.

“We will defend against any war efforts against Iran, whether it be an economic war or a military one, and we will face these efforts with strength,” he said.

Strains have increased between Iran and the United States, which is a firm backer of Tehran’s regional rival Saudi Arabia, after this month’s attack on oil tankers in the Gulf region that Washington has blamed on Iran.

Tehran has distanced itself from the bombings, but the United States has sent an aircraft carrier and an extra 1,500 troops to the Gulf, sparking concerns about the risks of conflict in a volatile region.

Iraq stands with Iran and is willing to act as an intermediary between its neighbour and the United States, Hakim said, adding that Baghdad does not believe an “economic blockade” is fruitful, a reference to U.S. sanctions.

“We are saying very clearly and honestly that we oppose the unilateral actions taken by the United States. We stand with the Islamic Republic of Iran in its position,” said Hakim. The United States and Iran are Iraq’s two main allies.

NUCLEAR REFERENDUM?

Washington has been seeking to tighten sanctions against Iran, as relations worsen under President Donald Trump, who last year pulled out of a nuclear agreement his predecessor Barack Obama had signed with Iran alongside other world powers in 2015.

In Tehran, President Hassan Rouhani floated the idea of holding a referendum over Iran’s nuclear programme, Iranian media reported.

A referendum over the controversial nuclear programme could give Iran’s leaders space to manoeuvre and a chance to resolve the standoff with the United States.

Top Iranian leaders have said they are not seeking war with the United States and officials speaking to Reuters from Tehran said last week that despite the sharpened rhetoric with Washington, authorities are trying to avoid an open conflict.

“Article 59 of the Constitution (referendum ) is a deadlock breaker … and could be a problem-solver at any junction,” the semi-official news agency ILNA quoted Rouhani as saying late on Saturday.

Rouhani said that, when he was a top nuclear negotiator in 2004, he had proposed holding a referendum on the nuclear issue to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

Iran has only held three referendums since its 1979 Islamic revolution — to approve the setting up of an Islamic Republic and then to approve and amend the constitution.

Washington says it has built up the U.S. military presence in the region, accusing Tehran of threats to U.S. troops and interests. Tehran has described U.S. moves as “psychological warfare” and a “political game”.

Separately, a deputy commander of Iran’s elite Revolutionary Guards said the U.S. military presence in the Middle East was at its “weakest in history” despite the talk of a build-up.

(Reporting by Ahmed Rasheed in Baghdad, additional reporting by Parisa Hafezi in Dubai and Dubai newsroom ; Writing by Ahmed Aboulenein; Editing by Keith Weir)

Source: OANN

MLB: Detroit Tigers at New York Mets
May 25, 2019; New York City, NY, USA; New York Mets catcher Wilson Ramos (40) watches his two run home run during the sixth inning against the Detriot Tigers at Citi Field. Gregory J. Fisher-USA TODAY Sports

May 26, 2019

Tomas Nido homered leading off the bottom of the 13th inning Saturday night as the New York Mets finally outlasted the Detroit Tigers, 5-4.

The Mets are 5-1 on a seven-game homestand. The Tigers have dropped 10 of 11.

The Mets loaded the bases with one out and failed to score in the bottom of the 11th before the Tigers did the same thing in the top of the 12th. Nido, who was the last player on the Mets’ bench when he entered in the 11th inning, capped a four hour and 11-minute duel when he hit his first walk-off homer off Buck Farmer (3-4).

Hector Santiago (1-0) tossed two innings for the Mets, who received two homers and four RBIs from catcher Wilson Ramos, who left for a pinch-runner in the 11th and was replaced by Nido. The two-homer game was the eighth of Ramos’ career and his first since last June 25.

Padres 19, Blue Jays 4

Austin Hedges hit his first career grand slam, Hunter Renfroe and Wil Myers each homered twice and visiting San Diego set a franchise record with seven homers while defeating Toronto.

Ian Kinsler and Eric Hosmer also homered for the Padres. Hedges had five RBIs and Myers had four.

Right-hander Cal Quantrill (1-2) struck out nine in six innings to earn his first career win for San Diego. Quantrill, who is from nearby Port Hope, Ont., and the son of former major league pitcher Paul Quantrill, allowed three runs on two hits, both home runs, and two walks in his fourth career start.

Yankees 7, Royals 3 (Game 1)

Luke Voit’s two-run home run in the seventh inning helped lead New York past host Kansas City in the first game of a day-night doubleheader.

With the win, the Yankees clinched the season series over the Royals for the fifth straight season. Since 2000, the Yankees have won 16 season series, with three splits and just one Royals series win (2014). The Yankees are 99-43 in the 2000s against Kansas City.

J.A. Happ (4-3) picked up the win after giving up three runs on four hits in six innings. Relying mostly on his fastball, Happ struck out 10 Royals.

Athletics 6, Mariners 5

Matt Chapman hit a home run, and Mike Fiers pitched six quality innings as Oakland defeated visiting Seattle for their eighth consecutive victory.

Domingo Santana hit two solo homers, and Mitch Haniger had one for Seattle, which lost its fifth in a row, eighth of nine and 20th of 25.

Chapman lined a solo shot over the wall in right-center field in the first inning against Mariners left-hander Yusei Kikuchi (3-2). Seattle twice tied the score after being down a run, but the Athletics never trailed.

Cubs 8, Reds 6

Jason Heyward, Addison Russell and Albert Almora Jr. each hit home runs, and Chicago Cubs outlasted visiting Cincinnati.

Anthony Rizzo also drove in a pair of runs for Chicago, which evened the series at one game apiece heading into Sunday’s finale. The Cubs improved to 18-9 at Wrigley Field. Tucker Barnhart, Derek Dietrich and Yasiel Puig each homered for Cincinnati.

The score was tied at 6 in the eighth when David Bote delivered a go-ahead double to deep center field with Almora at second base and Russell at first. Almora scored, and Kyle Schwarber followed with a sacrifice fly to send Russell home and increase the advantage to 8-6 entering the ninth.

Diamondbacks 10, Giants 4

Arizona put up double-figure runs for a second consecutive game, pummeling host San Francisco.

After an 18-2 romp of the Giants on Friday night, the Diamondbacks recorded 10 or more runs in back-to-back games for the first time since September 2017.

Ketel Marte hit the second pitch of the game for a triple and led off the third inning with a solo home run, his 11th of the season, highlighting a 13-hit attack one day after the Diamondbacks belted out 21 hits.

Cardinals 6, Braves 3

Pinch hitter Jedd Gyorko hit a three-run homer in the eighth inning to spark St. Louis to a win over visiting Atlanta.

Gyorko’s homer, his first of the season, came against reliever Dan Winkler (1-1) and highlighted a four-run rally. It was the first home run for Gyorko since Aug. 20, 2018, when he went deep against the Los Angeles Dodgers.

The Cardinals tied the game earlier in the inning when Matt Carpenter beat the shift with an RBI single to left field that scored Paul DeJong. Carpenter was 3-for-4 with two RBIs.

Rays 6, Indians 2

Charlie Morton struck out a season-high 10 batters and Ji-Man Choi and Tommy Pham each belted a two-run homer as visiting Tampa Bay beat Cleveland. Brandon Lowe added his team-leading 11th homer to go along with an RBI double for the Rays, who handed the Indians their fifth loss in six games.

Carlos Santana belted a solo homer and Leonys Martin had an RBI single for the Indians, who saw manager Terry Francona ejected for the first time since 2016 after arguing a called strike on a pitch that hit Jose Ramirez in the sixth inning.

Morton (5-0) allowed one run on three hits in six innings to improve to 8-0 during an 18-start unbeaten streak that dates back to Aug. 17.

Phillies 7, Brewers 2

Jake Arrieta pitched eight innings to win his first start in nearly a month, and Philadelphia moved a season-high 10 games over .500 with a victory over host Milwaukee.

The Phillies won their third straight and for the seventh time in nine games to improve to 31-21.

Andrew McCutchen and Cesar Hernandez hit early solo homers, while Rhys Hoskins and J.T. Realmuto hit back-to-back homers in the ninth as Philadelphia totaled 12 hits. Jean Segura contributed a bases-loaded walk and extended his hitting streak to 16 games with a single in the ninth.

Twins 8, White Sox 1

Ehire Adrianza went 3-for-4 with a homer and four RBIs, C.J. Cron also drove in four runs and Kyle Gibson allowed one run on five hits over seven innings to help Minnesota beat visiting Chicago for its fifth straight victory.

Cron finished 2-for-4 with a walk and two runs scored. Jonathan Schoop and Eddie Rosario each scored two runs, and Jorge Polanco also had two hits for Minnesota, which matched its longest winning streak of the season.

Gibson (5-2) won for the fifth time in his last seven starts, walking one and striking out nine to improve to 8-4 in 15 career starts against the White Sox.

Nationals 5, Marlins 0

Patrick Corbin, who signed a six-year, $140 million contract in December, pitched a four-hitter, and Yan Gomes hit a three-run double to lead host Washington to a win over Miami.

In his seventh year in the majors, this was just Corbin’s second career shutout and fifth complete game.

Corbin (5-2), who threw 116 pitches, allowed one walk and struck out five. He also induced three double plays and got first-pitch strikes on 17 of the 29 batters he faced. He got 21 called strikes and eight swinging.

(Field Level Media)

Source: OANN

On Thursday night Fox’s “Tucker Carlson Tonight” featured rare prime time coverage of the bombshell leaked OPCW report which refuted key events surrounding the April 2018 alleged chemical gas attack in Douma, Syria — which resulted in massive US and allied airstrikes on Damascus, nearly leading to a major war at the time. And now new allegations are looming which could once again lead to US airstrikes on Syria. 

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) is the international chemical weapons watchdog group which has worked in tandem with the UN to investigation claimed Sarin and chlorine gas attack sites in Syria. The smoking gun document, Tucker said in opening remarks, vindicates his and others’ past skepticism. He said:

“Now a leaked document shows there was good reason to be skeptical.” 

But here we are again — one year later — with yet another chemical attack claim near Idlib on Sunday, which the US State Department says it is investigating, vowing to “respond quickly and appropriately” if Assad is found guilty of using the banned weapons, according to an official statement.

But crucially, as Tucker Carlson pointed out on his show Thursday evening in reference last year’s Douma events, “At the time that happened this program was pretty much the only show on mainstream television to show any skepticism about the official narrative of the attack.”

Introducing a segment with Democratic presidential contender Tulsi Gabbard, a known longtime skeptic on Syrian regime change, Carlson reviewed the prior two American attacks on the Syrian government, noting “Justification for both attacks was an alleged aerial chemical weapons attack on anti-Assad rebels in Douma, Syria.”

Congresswomen Gabbard told the Fox host during the interview that the leaked document presents major reasons to doubt the official narrative concerning both Douma and the most recent claims out of Idlib being advanced by the al-Qaeda groups Hay’at Tahrir Al-Sham (HTS) and the Turkestan Islamic Party (TIP). She said she is reaching out to both the UN and OPCW for answers.

Referencing current and past Syria chemical attack claims, Tucker agreed that, “I’m beginning to suspect that we’re being played here.”

The document, whose authenticity the OPCW has confirmed, contends that the official story which was used to justify an air strike by the US, UK and France about poison gas being dropped on civilians from Syrian government helicopters is scientifically implausible, saying “In summary, observations at the scene of the two locations, together with subsequent analysis, suggest that there is a higher probability that both cylinders were manually placed at those two locations rather than being delivered from aircraft.” — Establishment Narrative-Managers Struggling With New Syria Plot Holes

Since the leaked OPCW report surfaced over a week ago there’s predictably been mainstream silence, perhaps with the exception of two major UK outlets, The Independent and The Daily Mail.

Rocket scientist and MIT professor emeritus Theodore Postol has also weighed in to say the new evidence reveals the “attacks were staged”.

Writing for The Independent, world-renowned Middle East war correspondent Robert Fisk summarized the significance of the leaked report. This comes just as once again US war rhetoric against Damascus is looming.

Fisk wrote in his report:

The OPCW officially maintains that these canisters were probably dropped by an aircraft – probably a helicopter, presumably Syrian – over Douma on 7 April 2018. But the dissenting assessment, which the OPCW made no reference to in its published conclusions, finds there is a “higher probability that both cylinders were manually placed at those two locations rather than being delivered from aircraft”.

It is difficult to underestimate the seriousness of this manipulative act by the OPCW. In a response to the conservative author Peter Hitchens, who also writes for the Mail on Sunday – he is of course the brother of the late Christopher Hitchens – the OPCW admits that its so-called technical secretariat “is conducting an internal investigation about the unauthorised [sic] release of the document”.

Importantly, the OPCW has confirmed the authenticity of the report, authored by an expert that had spent most of his career as an on the ground technical investigator since the OPCW’s inception.

The leaked OPCW document can be accessed here.

Though there’s largely been a mainstream media blackout on the leaked document, it’s possible it could slowly trickle into media discourse following Fox’s prime time coverage on Tucker’s show.

Fisk further articulated that the document is a game-changer at the conclusion of his article, saying, “Put bluntly, the paper is suggesting that the location of the cylinders was a set-up, that someone inside Douma immediately after the bombings of 7 April 2018 – and no one, not even the Syrians or Russians, deny there was conventional bombing and shelling that night – placed the cylinders in the locations in which they were subsequently examined by the OPCW.”

With the potential for a new round of attacks by US forces against Assad based on fresh chemical attack claims out of Idlib, we wonder, did President Trump catch Tucker’s show on Thursday night?

Source: InfoWars

The Pentagon says “the leadership of Iran at the highest level” ordered a spate of disruptive attacks over the past two weeks including attacks on an Aramco Saudi oil pipeline and pumping facilities, the recent sabotage of four tankers near the Strait of Hormuz, as well as a May 19 lone rocket attack on the US embassy in Baghdad’s protected Green Zone. 

However, the Pentagon statements issued by Adm. Michael Gilday, director of the Joint Staff, on Friday offered absolutely nothing in terms of hard proof. That still didn’t stop the war rhetoric from continuing: “Even more troubling: We have had multiple credible reports that Iranian proxy groups intend to attack U.S. personnel in the Middle East,” Gilday said.

File photo of US troops positioned at Qayyarah West Airfield, Iraq.

The military analysis site, Task & Purpose in a follow-up pressed the Pentagon to cite some level of evidence that Iran did indeed order attacks “at the highest levels.” The response was issued as follows:

“The Iranians said they were going to close the Strait of Hormuz,” Gilday said. “The Iranians struck those tankers. The Iranians struck the pipeline facility in Saudi Arabia through their proxies in Yemen. We know they’re tied directly to those proxies. We know they’re tied directly to the proxies in Iraq that launched the rocket.”

The Pentagon statements came on the heels of a Washington Post report saying the White House has agreed to send “roughly 2,000” additional troops to the Middle East to help protect American forces in the region and “monitor Iran” — as prior reports suggested in the days leading to Trump’s Thursday meeting with Defense Department leaders. Follow-up statements have put the number at 1,500.

Trump met with Pentagon leaders Thursday evening where they decided to move ahead with the troop deployment to CENTCOM, which oversees all American troops in the Middle East.

“The deployment will include approximately 1,500 U.S. military personnel and consist of a Patriot battalion to defend against missile threats, additional intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance aircraft, an engineer element to provide force protection improvements throughout the region and a fighter aircraft squadron to provide additional deterrence and depth to our aviation response options,” acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan said in a written statement Friday.

Cardinal Raymond Burke recently commented about those Muslim immigrants that are “opportunists” looking to replace western culture with their own. Owen explains that it’s a good sign that not everyone in the Catholic church is a globalist like the current pope.

Importantly, Adm. Gilday said Iran’s series of attacks last week went straight to the top: “We believe with a high degree of confidence that this [recent attacks] stems back to the leadership in Iran at the highest levels,” he said.

However, given the original Pentagon plan reportedly pitched a total troop deployment of up to 10,000 additional forces to counter Iran in the Middle East, Trump’s agreeing to a much humbler 1,500 appears a meager attempt to merely pacify the hawks without actually changing the playing field significantly.

Or rather, to put up the pretense and appearance of “doing something” without actually substantively escalating at all.

The president himself seemed to all but admit this in passing remarks to reporters as he left the White House for a trip to Japan: “We want to have protection in the Middle East. We’re going to be sending a relatively small number of troops, mostly protective,” Trump said. “Some very talented people are going to the Middle East right now. And we’ll see what happens,” he added.

However, troop build-up in the region to any degree could prove explosive and extremely dangerous for the prospect of a broader conflagration, considering both the IRGC’s recent terror designation, as well as Iran ally Syria coming under new chemical weapons scrutiny over fresh claims it used poison gas in a battle near Idlib on Sunday.

Source: InfoWars

The Pentagon says “the leadership of Iran at the highest level” ordered a spate of disruptive attacks over the past two weeks including attacks on an Aramco Saudi oil pipeline and pumping facilities, the recent sabotage of four tankers near the Strait of Hormuz, as well as a May 19 lone rocket attack on the US embassy in Baghdad’s protected Green Zone. 

However, the Pentagon statements issued by Adm. Michael Gilday, director of the Joint Staff, on Friday offered absolutely nothing in terms of hard proof. That still didn’t stop the war rhetoric from continuing: “Even more troubling: We have had multiple credible reports that Iranian proxy groups intend to attack U.S. personnel in the Middle East,” Gilday said.

File photo of US troops positioned at Qayyarah West Airfield, Iraq.

The military analysis site, Task & Purpose in a follow-up pressed the Pentagon to cite some level of evidence that Iran did indeed order attacks “at the highest levels.” The response was issued as follows:

“The Iranians said they were going to close the Strait of Hormuz,” Gilday said. “The Iranians struck those tankers. The Iranians struck the pipeline facility in Saudi Arabia through their proxies in Yemen. We know they’re tied directly to those proxies. We know they’re tied directly to the proxies in Iraq that launched the rocket.”

The Pentagon statements came on the heels of a Washington Post report saying the White House has agreed to send “roughly 2,000” additional troops to the Middle East to help protect American forces in the region and “monitor Iran” — as prior reports suggested in the days leading to Trump’s Thursday meeting with Defense Department leaders. Follow-up statements have put the number at 1,500.

Trump met with Pentagon leaders Thursday evening where they decided to move ahead with the troop deployment to CENTCOM, which oversees all American troops in the Middle East.

“The deployment will include approximately 1,500 U.S. military personnel and consist of a Patriot battalion to defend against missile threats, additional intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance aircraft, an engineer element to provide force protection improvements throughout the region and a fighter aircraft squadron to provide additional deterrence and depth to our aviation response options,” acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan said in a written statement Friday.

Cardinal Raymond Burke recently commented about those Muslim immigrants that are “opportunists” looking to replace western culture with their own. Owen explains that it’s a good sign that not everyone in the Catholic church is a globalist like the current pope.

Importantly, Adm. Gilday said Iran’s series of attacks last week went straight to the top: “We believe with a high degree of confidence that this [recent attacks] stems back to the leadership in Iran at the highest levels,” he said.

However, given the original Pentagon plan reportedly pitched a total troop deployment of up to 10,000 additional forces to counter Iran in the Middle East, Trump’s agreeing to a much humbler 1,500 appears a meager attempt to merely pacify the hawks without actually changing the playing field significantly.

Or rather, to put up the pretense and appearance of “doing something” without actually substantively escalating at all.

The president himself seemed to all but admit this in passing remarks to reporters as he left the White House for a trip to Japan: “We want to have protection in the Middle East. We’re going to be sending a relatively small number of troops, mostly protective,” Trump said. “Some very talented people are going to the Middle East right now. And we’ll see what happens,” he added.

However, troop build-up in the region to any degree could prove explosive and extremely dangerous for the prospect of a broader conflagration, considering both the IRGC’s recent terror designation, as well as Iran ally Syria coming under new chemical weapons scrutiny over fresh claims it used poison gas in a battle near Idlib on Sunday.

Source: InfoWars


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