Beto

After the New Zealand mosque shootings in March, Trump was asked whether white nationalism was

“rising threat around the world.”

The president responded:

“I don’t. I don’t really. It’s a small group of people…But it is a terrible thing.”

Castro, speaking to anchor Jonathan Karl, said that only the shooter bears “direct” responsibility. (In a statement released later Sunday, Castro echoed that comment, saying,

“These shooters are ultimately to blame for their actions. They are attempting to terrorize us but I believe that the vast majority of Americans reject this hatred.”

Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney denied earlier on “This Week” that Trump had “downplayed” the threat of white nationalism and at the White House in March, Trump remarked,

“Last month, more than 76,000 illegal migrants arrived at our border. We’re on track for a million illegal aliens to rush our borders. People hate the word ‘invasion,’ but that’s what it is. It’s an invasion of drugs and criminals and people. You have no idea who they are.” “At the same time, as our national leader, you have a role to play in either fanning the flames of division or trying to bring Americans of different backgrounds together,”

Castro told Karl.

“Most presidents have chosen to try and bring people together. This president very early on made a clear choice to divide people for his own political benefit. And these are some of the consequences that we’re seeing of that.”

Asked about the March interaction, Mulvaney said Trump has been misinterpreted.

Trump condemned the El Paso shooting early Sunday morning, calling it “hateful” and “an act of cowardice.”

“It’s no accident that, just a few weeks after he announced his 2020 reelection bid, where he was indulging and entertaining this ‘Send her back’ chant,”

Castro said.

“And he’s spoken about immigrants as being invaders. “

He’s given license for this toxic brew of white supremacy to fester more and more in this country. And we’re seeing the results of that.”

Shortly after Beto O’Rourke claimed Sunday that President Trump’s “racism” is what “leads to” violent shootings, another Democratic presidential contender, Julian Castro said

“there’s one person that’s responsible directly” for Saturday’s deadly mass shooting in El Paso, Texas — “and that’s the shooter.” “God bless the people of El Paso Texas,” “God bless the people of Dayton, Ohio.”

Trump said.

Responding directly to Mulvaney’s comments, Castro told Karl,

“You know, it’s so unfortunate that not only our president but his administration can’t rise up to the challenge of leadership in these times.” “We need to acknowledge that this is a problem.”

Buttigieg said, claiming that white nationalism has been “condoned at the highest levels” in Washington. Fox News’ Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.

“Right now you see it being echoed by the White House and there is a measure of responsibility that you just can’t get away from,”

he said. Buttigieg cited President Trump’s comment that there were “very fine people” on both sides after a deadly attack at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va.

“This is terrorism and we have to name it as such,”

Buttigieg said, specifically calling it “white nationalist terrorism” in a conversation with host Chris Wallace on “Fox News Sunday.” Mulvaney continued:

“I don’t think it’s fair to try and lay this at the feet of the president. There are people in this country this morning thinking that President Trump was happy by this. That’s a sad, sad state of this nation. He’s angry. He’s upset. He wants it to stop. I don’t think it’s at all fair to sit here and say that he doesn’t think that white nationalism is bad for the nation. These are sick people. You cannot be a white supremacist and be normal in the head.”

In January, Trump wrote on Twitter,

“Humanitarian Crisis at our Southern Border. I just got back and it is a far worse situation than almost anyone would understand, an invasion!”

At the same time, Castro told ABC News’ “This Week,” Trump has embraced “division and bigotry and fanning the flames of hate” as a form of “political strategy.”

Separately on Sunday, Democratic presidential contender Pete Buttigieg pointed specifically to “weak gun safety” measures and white nationalism as the culprits, after the El Paso shooter was linked to anti-Mexican statements.

“I don’t believe that’s downplaying it, look at what he said,”  “Look, this is not the same as international nuclear weapons. This is a serious problem, there’s no question about it. But they are sick, sick people and the president knows that.”

Mulvaney said.

Tribe subsequently clarified by saying that he is not saying that Trump

“should be impeached” for “racist incitements alone,” rather that “impeaching the president for inciting white nationalist terrorism and violence [should be] taken as seriously as impeaching him for obstructing justice.”

Democrats such as presidential candidates Pete Buttigieg and Beto O’Rourke accused Trump of encouraging racism, but Tribe went so far as to imply that the president may have committed high crimes or misdemeanors and should be removed from office for taking an active role in supporting racist violence.

Harvard Law professor Laurence Tribe has a history of passionate opposition to President Trump and calling for his impeachment, and he continued the trend Sunday by blaming Trump for a pair of shootings that took place over the weekend in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio.

The professor included a link to a video of a Trump rally, which was meant to be an example. In it, the president was discussing migrant caravans. Trump asked what to do, and someone in the crowd yelled,

“Shoot them!”

Trump shook his head, then joked,

“Only in the panhandle, you can get away with that statement.”

Immediately prior to the person’s outburst, Trump noted that

“we can’t let [border patrol agents] use weapons. Other countries do, I would never do that.”

The video had been posted as a reply to Tribe’s tweet but has since been removed.

In May, the constitutional law professor drew attention for comparing Trump to Adolf Hitler, saying,

“the physical and behavioral resemblances aren’t altogether irrelevant.”

In 2018, he focused a Constitutional Law course he was teaching on Trump and his hypothetical impeachment.

“It’s the pattern of abuses of his office as president that is accumulating, in my view, to a strong basis for formal impeachment proceedings beyond what various House committees are already conducting by way of investigating possible Articles of Impeachment,”

he said.

Tribe first promoted discussion of impeaching Trump for inciting violent acts, then took it a step further and outright accused the president of the United States of terrorism.

“How many more people have to DIE violent deaths at racist hands before impeaching the president for inciting white nationalist terrorism and violence is taken as seriously as impeaching him for obstructing justice? The real national emergency is Donald J. Trump’s terrorism,”

Tribe tweeted Sunday morning.

When asked for an explanation by Fox News, Tribe did not go into any legal analysis, but said,

“There is an alarming pattern of incitements that together warrant being taken seriously in conjunction with other, more specific, offenses.”

In the last fundraising quarter, nearly half of the Democratic presidential candidates are burning through cash reserves faster than donors are giving.

According to Federal Election Commission records the biggest spenders are New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker and Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard. Former Maryland Rep. John Delaney was also listed as having spent several million more than he raised.

Highest burn rates, second quarter

Kirsten Gillibrand:

Raised $2.3 million. Spent $4.2 million

Beto O’Rourke:

Raised $3.6 million. Spent $5.3 million

Cory Booker:

Raised $4.5 million. Spent $5.3 million

Tulsi Gabbard:

Raised $1.6 million. Spent $1.9 million

While all the candidates still maintain substantial amounts of cash on hand, running a deficit this early into their campaigns is not a very great sign of success.

Though honestly as much as we may think money isn’t the most important aspect of a presidential campaign, it’s certainly an essential component.

Although the Republican National Committee and the president have raked in donations – Trump alone to the tune of $56 million – many Democrats claim that the general election is far from a foregone conclusion.

Money sometimes does not decide the election, a LOT of it has to do with the character of the candidates and their likeability.

What will happen in the 2020 season is up in the air.. personally my opinion is Trump will win… what do you think?

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Mueller has agreed to testify before the House judiciary and intelligence committee, do really think he had anything important to say?

Mueller agrees to testify under subpoena before House lawmakers 
It looks like critics who thought they had heard the last from former Special Counsel Robert Mueller in the ongoing President Trump-Russia collusion saga have been proven wrong. Mueller has agreed to testify before the House judiciary and intelligence committees on July 17 after they subpoenaed See More Mueller on Tuesday, according to the committees’ chairmen, Reps. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., and Adam Schiff, D-Calif. House Democrats have fought toget access to Mueller and his unredacted report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and whether President Trump obstructed justice. Weeks of negotiations between the Democrats and the Justice Department ultimately resulted in the subpoena.

Fox News has learned Mueller would agree to appear only under a subpoena – and that the subpoena was “friendly.” Perhaps a bigger question is, What do Democrats hope to achieve with Mueller’s testimony? The news of his scheduled appearance has already overshadowed this week’s scheduled Democratic primary debates and could be addressed by all 20 presidential candidates over the two-night event in Miami. Some GOP lawmakers, such asU.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida, a Judiciary Committee member, warn that Democrats could be planting the seeds of “impeachment by surprise.” But Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., says Mueller better be prepared for a “GOP cross-examination” when he testifies.

Dershowitz: Dems ‘shooting themselves in the foot’ with Mueller subpoena
Democrats will regret issuing a subpoena to former Special Counsel Robert Mueller, according to famed legal scholar Alan Dershowitz. Democrats, Dershowitz argues, appear to have overlooked that Republican lawmakers also will have an opportunity to question Mueller and highlight weaknesses and potential biases in his investigation and report. And Mueller cannot refuse to answer questions from Republicans not covered by “privilege,” Dershowitz said on Fox News’ “The Ingraham Angle.” “I’m trying to stop them from shooting themselves in the foot,” he said. In separate column for FoxNews.com, Dershowitz, writes the following: “Mueller should refuse to say anything about the investigation of Trump and his campaign beyond what is already in his report.”

Democratic primary debate, Night 1
The road to the 2020 presidential election will heat up, starting with the first Democratic primary debate, which will take place over two consecutive nights, starting Wednesday. Because so many qualified for the first round of debate, the candidates were split up randomly into two groups. The two-hour debates will kick off at 9 p.m. E.T. in Miami, Fla. on Wednesday and Thursday. A total of 20 candidates — 10 each night — will debate. Wednesday’s participants will include: Julian castro, former secretary of Housing and Urban Development; John Delaney a former congressman from Maryland; U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii; Washington Gov. Jay Inslee; U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota; Beto O’Rourke, a former congressman from Texas; U.S. Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio; and U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.

Showdown over border aid bill brews in Congress; Customs and Border Protection chief steps down
The House approved a $4.5 billion supplemental spending bill on Tuesday night to address humanitarian issues at the U.S.-Mexico border and to provide additional funding for food, water, medical services and stronger protections for unaccompanied children, among other things — setting up a showdown between the Democrat-led House and the Republican-led Senate. The House bill, which passed 230-195, included specifics that would prevent the Trump administration from allowing any funding to go toward supporting Immigrationand Customs Enforcement (ICE) personnel at the border, likely to become a point of contention with Republicans. President Trump warned Monday that he would veto the House bill if it passed. Earlier Wednesday, Acting Commissioner John Sanders of U.S. Customs and Border Protection resigned amid ongoing controversy over conditions at migrant detention facilities along the U.S-Mexico border.

Navy SEAL’s defense expected to begin at court-martial
The prosecution in the court-martial of Navy SEAL Eddie Gallagher rested its case Tuesday, ending six days of testimony in which SEALs accused one of their own of stabbing to death an ISIS prisoner in Iraq in 2017. Special Operations Chief Gallagher is charged with premeditated murder. In a trial that has frayed the reputation of the SEAL community, the Navy’s lead investigator took the witness stand Tuesday for cross-examination and was accused of vindictiveness, incompetence and a rush to judgment. Gallagher’sdefense is expected to begin its case Wednesday morning and show jurors videotaped testimony from an Iraqi general who handed over the ISIS fighter to Gallagher for medical treatment..

TODAY’S MUST-READS
Jay Sekulow: Obama administration’s anti-Trump actions revealed in newly disclosed documents.
Lawrence Jones: NBA ‘owner’ nix is ‘political correctness gone wild.’
Dozens of uniformed service members attend funeral of 5-year-old who wanted to be ‘Army Man.’ 

MINDING YOUR BUSINESS
Wayfair employees plan walkout over $200G furniture order to immigration detention facility.
These are the most undervalued cities in the US this year.
Town where Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates live is running out of money.

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