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(Washington, DC) – Judicial Watch announced today that a senior FBI official admitted, in writing and under oath, that the agency found Clinton email records in the Obama White House, specifically, the Executive Office of the President. The FBI also admitted nearly 49,000 Clinton server emails were reviewed as result of a search warrant for her material on the laptop of Anthony Weiner.

E.W. (Bill) Priestap, assistant director of the FBI Counterintelligence Division, made the disclosure to Judicial Watch as part of court-ordered discovery into the Clinton email issue.

U.S District Court Judge Royce Lamberth ordered Obama administration senior State Department officials, lawyers, and Clinton aides, as well as Priestap, to be deposed or answer writer questions under oath. The court ruled that the Clinton email system was “one of the gravest modern offenses to government transparency.”

Priestap was asked by Judicial Watch to identify representatives of Hillary Clinton, her former staff, and government agencies from which “email repositories were obtained.” Priestap responded with the following non-exhaustive list:

  • Bryan Pagliano
  • Cheryl Mills
  • Executive Office of the President [Emphasis added]
  • Heather Samuelson
  • Jacob Sullivan
  • Justin Cooper
  • United States Department of State
  • United States Secret Service
  • Williams & Connolly LLP

Priestap also testifies that 48,982 emails were reviewed as a result of a warrant for Clinton email account information from the laptop of Anthony Weiner, who had been married to top Clinton aide Huma Abedin.

A complete copy of Priestap’s interrogatory responses is available here. Priestap, is serving as assistant director of the FBI’s counterintelligence division and helped oversee both the Clinton email and the 2016 presidential campaign investigations. Priestap testified in a separate lawsuit that Clinton was the subject of a grand jury investigation related to her BlackBerry email accounts.

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Image Credit: Politico

French Open - Roland Garros
Tennis – French Open – Roland Garros, Paris, France – May 26, 2019 Switzerland’s Roger Federer in action during his first round match against Italy’s Lorenzo Sonego REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

May 26, 2019

By Julien Pretot

PARIS (Reuters) – Roger Federer made a stylish comeback to the French Open after a three-year hiatus as the revamped, widely-acclaimed Roland Garros burst into life on Sunday.

The 20-time Grand Slam champion, back on the Paris clay 10 years after his only title here, swept aside Italian Lorenzo Sonego 6-2 6-4 6-4 in a graceful performance on an expanded court Philippe Chatrier.

“The reception I got today was crazy, it was really nice to see a full stadium for a first round like this. It was a beauty,” the 37-year-old Swiss told reporters.

Earlier, 2016 champion Garbine Muguruza inaugurated the new court Simonne Mathieu with a first-round victory, describing the semi-sunken 5,000-seater as a ‘cosy’ place.

Situated within a botanical garden at the East end of Roland Garros, the court is cocooned by greenhouses featuring rare tropical plants.

“It’s a cute court. It’s in a very different place. You don’t feel like you are around a court. It’s like in a garden,” Muguruza said.

Some top players, however, will not get much chance to enjoy the new stadium, with former world number ones Angelique Kerber and Venus Williams sent packing along with former winner Svetlana Kuznetsova.

Opening proceedings on Chatrier, Germany’s Kerber was downed in two short sets by Russia’s Anastasia Potapova as her attempt at completing a career slam was cut short on her least favorite surface.

Seven-time Grand Slam champion Williams was also eliminated in straight sets by Ukraine’s Elina Svitolina, the ninth seed and one of a dozen contenders for the Suzanne Lenglen Cup.

Last year’s semi-finalist Marco Cecchinato of Italy, seeded 16th, was at the receiving end of Nicolas Mahut’s spectacular comeback as the local favorite advanced into the second round with a 2-6 6-7(8-6) 6-4 6-2 6-4 victory on court Simonne Mathieu.

In the women’s draw, second seed Karolina Pliskova and seventh seed Sloane Stephens eased into round two while on the men’s side, Greek sensation Stefanos Tsitsipas and Japan’s Kei Nishikori also progressed.

Top favorites Rafa Nadal, the 11-time champion, and world number one Novak Djokovic will be in first-round action on Monday.

(Reporting by Julien Pretot; editing by Tony Lawrence)

Source: OANN

Tennis: French Open
May 26, 2019; Paris, France; Stefanos Tsitsipas (GRE) hits the ball during his match against Maximilian Marterer (not pictured) on day one of the 2019 French Open at Stade Roland Garros. Mandatory Credit: Susan Mullane-USA TODAY Sports

May 26, 2019

By Julien Pretot

PARIS (Reuters) – Stefanos Tsitsipas’s style, and his calm, have already drawn comparisons with 20-time Grand Slam champion Roger Federer, yet the Greek sensation may in fact have more in common with claycourt master Rafa Nadal.

The sixth seed reached the second round of the French Open with a no-nonsense 6-2 6-2 7-6 (4) victory against German Maximilian Marterer, with few fans to witness the feat as most of the crowd were grabbing lunch in the revamped Roland Garros before Federer made his return on the new court Philippe Chatrier.

Those who skipped the match missed Tsitsipas’s ease on the red dirt.

“Learning tennis on clay is very good for your body, for your development. It’s a way to learn how to slide, basically learn the basics of tennis,” the 20-year-old told reporters.

“Then you can move to hard (courts). That’s my personal opinion. I probably practised… I don’t know, I might be wrong… but I practised since the age of six up to the age of 14 on clay.

“Probably more than Rafa,” he added with a laugh.

Tsitsipas made a name for himself by beating 11-time French Open champion Rafa Nadal in the Madrid Open semi-finals earlier this month before losing to Novak Djokovic in the final.

The result boosted his confidence ahead of Roland Garros, one of his favorite tournaments — only Wimbledon trumps the Parisian event for him, but the surface is not the reason.

“I like Roland Garros because it’s the only Grand Slam on clay, I grew up playing on clay. I love the crowd. They are

very respectful,” he explained.

“Well, obviously they’re going to support the French guys if I play the French guys. The clay makes it very special. And also, I would say that after Wimbledon, Roland Garros is probably one of my favourites.

“My dream is to win it one day because of the history and because of the tradition.”

Next up for Tsitsipas is Bolivian Hugo Dellien, with Federer a potential opponent in the quarter-finals.

(Reporting by Julien Pretot; Editing by Tony Lawrence)

Source: OANN

French Open - Roland Garros
Tennis – French Open – Roland Garros, Paris, France – May 26, 2019 Switzerland’s Roger Federer in action during his first round match against Italy’s Lorenzo Sonego REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

May 26, 2019

By Julien Pretot

PARIS (Reuters) – Roger Federer returned to the French Open and breezed into the second round with a 6-2 6-4 6-4 win against Italian Lorenzo Sonego on Sunday, four years after hitting his last ball on the Parisian clay.

The third-seeded Swiss, who won his only title at Roland Garros 10 years ago, treated the crowd at the renovated court Philippe Chatrier to some exquisite shot-making, thwarting his opponent’s attempted comeback in the second set.

Sporting cream shorts and a taupe shirt that perfectly matched the red clay, the former world number one, who has been as been absent from the tournament since 2015, played some exquisite tennis as Sonego struggled to cope with the early pressure.

“Don’t be too quick, Roger!,” a spectator shouted after Federer had raced to a 4-0 lead in the second set, even playing serve-volley at times, a rarely-used tactic on clay.

That seemed to spur Sonego into action.

A jaw-dropping passing shot and a superb lob almost turned the crowd in his favour, but Federer contained the world number 73 and claimed the decisive break for 5-4 in the third set with a delicate backhand passing shot.

He then served it out to set up a second-round meeting with Germany’s Oscar Otte.

Federer opted to skip the French Open for the past three years — a decision based on prolonging his career

“I feel that the public missed me, and I missed them, as well,” Federer told reporters.

“There was some buzz, which I could feel on the central court when I was training and when I was playing today.

“So it was rather cool, rather pleasant, and I really loved the welcome I got on the court. I hope that it continues like this.”

Federer showed no ill effects of a right-leg injury that caused him to pull out of the Italian Open before his quarter-final clash against Greek Stefanos Tsitsipas, his possible last-eight opponent in Paris.

“No problems with my body before or after the match,” said the 37-year-old, who will play his next match in three days.

(Reporting by Julien Pretot; Editing by Toby Davis)

Source: OANN

Hotel maids, observe demonstrators during a pro-government demonstration near Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro
Hotel maids, observe demonstrators during a pro-government demonstration near Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil May 26, 2019. REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes

May 26, 2019

By Brad Brooks and Rodrigo Viga Gaier

SAO PAULO/RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) – Brazilians gathered in cities on Sunday to show their support for far-right President Jair Bolsonaro and to protest against lawmakers whom they see as putting up roadblocks to the leader’s legislative agenda.

There was not yet any official estimates on crowds, but by midday they appeared smaller than May 15 protests against Bolsonaro and his government’s planned spending freeze on education that sent tens of thousands into streets in over 200 cities, the largest protests in Brazil since Bolsonaro took office.

Bolsonaro easily won election last November, but since taking office on Jan. 1 has seen his popularity plummet in several polls. A survey released on Friday showed more Brazilians disapprove his government than approve it, a surprisingly fast erosion of popularity.

Those in the streets on Sunday argue that Brazil’s corrupt political system has not allowed Bolsonaro to push through his legislative agenda and make progress in critical areas like security, education and the economy. They say that Bolsonaro is standing by his core pledge to not engage in the traditional political horse trading in Brasilia that is largely blamed for the stunning levels of corruption in the nation’s political class.

Bolsonaro initially considered participating in the demonstrations, but later decided not to and recommended the government’s ministers not join. Protesters gathered in Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Belo Horizonte and Brasilia

In Rio de Janeiro, most demonstrators in the world-famous Copacabana Beach wore Brazil soccer team t-shirts and protested against Lower House speaker Rodrigo Maia and the Supreme Court.

“I have voted years for the left, but I am now worried about the future of the country. I hope the demonstrations influence Congress,” said Carley Farias.

Demonstrators brought an inflatable doll of Maia with logos of companies accused of paying him bribes, alongside an inflatable doll of former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva dressed in a striped jail suit, known as “Pixuleco”.

“Maia needs to wake up and help the country”, Jose Antonio de Souza told Reuters while demonstrating in Copacabana.

Speaking in a Sunday cult in a church in Rio, Bolsonaro said the demonstrations are giving a response “to those that insist on keeping old practices and do not allow the people to be free”.

Bolsonaro promised voters that he would secure an economic turnaround in part by reforming the pension system, that he would greatly improve Brazil’s precarious security situation and would end rampant corruption that has ensnared the country’s political and business elites in unprecedented anti-graft investigations during the past five years.

While those are clearly ambitious goals that will take time to make progress on, many of those who voted for Bolsonaro have grown frustrated with what is seen as unnecessary and incendiary tweets he and his politician-sons send out daily and the infighting between the military and far-right ideologue wings of his government, which is blamed for the few concrete accomplishments his team has made.

(Reporting by Brad Brooks in Sao Paulo and Rodrigo Viga Gaier in Rio; writing by Tatiana Bautzer; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

Source: OANN

The Supreme Court of Utah upheld a six-month suspension without pay for a municipal judge who disparaged President Donald Trump on social media and during official judicial proceedings.

Taylorsville Justice Court Judge Michael Kwan undermined public confidence in the courts by intervening in the political process, the state Supreme Court concluded.

“Fulfillment of judicial duties does not come without personal sacrifice of some opportunities and privileges available to the public at large,” Utah Supreme Court Justice John Pearce wrote in an opinion upholding the sanctions against Kwan. “And as a person the public entrusts to decide issues with the utmost fairness, independence, and impartiality, a judge must at times set aside the power of his or her voice.”

The state Judicial Conduct Commission (JCC) brought formal charges against Kwan after the judge disparaged the president on social networks and in his own courtroom during official proceedings. In one social media post, for example, Kwan suggested that congressional Republicans were comparable to the rubber-stamp parliament of Nazi Germany.

“Welcome to the beginning of the fascist takeover,” Kwan wrote. “We need to be diligent in questioning congressional Republicans if they are going to be the American Reichstag and refuse to stand up for the Constitution, refuse to uphold their oath of office, and enable the tyrants to consolidate their power.”

On another occasion, the judge dismissed a defendant’s contention that he would pay off overdue court fines with his tax rebate, saying that Trump will only give tax cuts to the wealthy.

The JCC concluded that Kwan’s internet posts and statements in court were “prejudicial to the administration of justice” and suspended the judge without pay for six months.

The state Supreme Court reviewed those findings. Kwan said his social media commentary is protected First Amendment speech. The court rejected Kwan’s argument, saying state precedent provides that judges cannot raise their first constitutional challenge to a JCC rule in a disciplinary proceeding. However, Pearce seemed to acknowledge that precedent is problematic and could be revisited in a future case.

According to Pearce’s opinion, the JCC and the Utah bar association have sanctioned Kwan in the past for inappropriate political commentary and misuse of judicial authority, to include imposing jail sentences in absentia and assessing excessive fines. On one occasion, the state Supreme Court publicly reprimanded Kwan for serving as president of a nonprofit that took policy positions and criticized candidates for public office.


Source: InfoWars

The Supreme Court of Utah upheld a six-month suspension without pay for a municipal judge who disparaged President Donald Trump on social media and during official judicial proceedings.

Taylorsville Justice Court Judge Michael Kwan undermined public confidence in the courts by intervening in the political process, the state Supreme Court concluded.

“Fulfillment of judicial duties does not come without personal sacrifice of some opportunities and privileges available to the public at large,” Utah Supreme Court Justice John Pearce wrote in an opinion upholding the sanctions against Kwan. “And as a person the public entrusts to decide issues with the utmost fairness, independence, and impartiality, a judge must at times set aside the power of his or her voice.”

The state Judicial Conduct Commission (JCC) brought formal charges against Kwan after the judge disparaged the president on social networks and in his own courtroom during official proceedings. In one social media post, for example, Kwan suggested that congressional Republicans were comparable to the rubber-stamp parliament of Nazi Germany.

“Welcome to the beginning of the fascist takeover,” Kwan wrote. “We need to be diligent in questioning congressional Republicans if they are going to be the American Reichstag and refuse to stand up for the Constitution, refuse to uphold their oath of office, and enable the tyrants to consolidate their power.”

On another occasion, the judge dismissed a defendant’s contention that he would pay off overdue court fines with his tax rebate, saying that Trump will only give tax cuts to the wealthy.

The JCC concluded that Kwan’s internet posts and statements in court were “prejudicial to the administration of justice” and suspended the judge without pay for six months.

The state Supreme Court reviewed those findings. Kwan said his social media commentary is protected First Amendment speech. The court rejected Kwan’s argument, saying state precedent provides that judges cannot raise their first constitutional challenge to a JCC rule in a disciplinary proceeding. However, Pearce seemed to acknowledge that precedent is problematic and could be revisited in a future case.

According to Pearce’s opinion, the JCC and the Utah bar association have sanctioned Kwan in the past for inappropriate political commentary and misuse of judicial authority, to include imposing jail sentences in absentia and assessing excessive fines. On one occasion, the state Supreme Court publicly reprimanded Kwan for serving as president of a nonprofit that took policy positions and criticized candidates for public office.


Source: InfoWars

French Open - Roland Garros
Tennis – French Open – Roland Garros, Paris, France – May 26, 2019 Germany’s Angelique Kerber during her first round match against Russia’s Anastasia Potapova REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

May 26, 2019

By Julien Pretot

PARIS (Reuters) – Angelique Kerber’s campaign to complete a career slam was cut short in the French Open first round on Sunday, but that came as no surprise considering the former world number one was playing on her least favorite surface.

Add in a niggling ankle injury to her poor record on clay, there was little chance that the fifth-seeded German would win a tournament where she has never gone past the quarter-finals in 11 previous appearances.

She entered only two claycourt tournaments – in Stuttgart and Madrid – before arriving in Paris, winning only one match at each. An ankle injury meant the German aborted her Madrid Open challenge without hitting a ball in her second-round match.

“The year has been with up-and-downs and right now I lost here the first round, so what should I say?,” Kerber told reporters after being swept aside 6-4 6-2 on Court Philippe Chatrier by Russian Anastasia Potapova.

“Of course I’m disappointed, but I tried everything the last two weeks to be here to play a match, and I was happy about the process the last days, but at the end, I didn’t have real match practice.”

Kerber, who would have reclaimed the world number one ranking by lifting the Suzanne Lenglen Cup on June 8, did not really believe in her own chances.

“At the end I really didn’t have too much expectation for this tournament,” she admitted.

“I think the feeling I had before the tournament was right.”

Even though she owns three claycourt titles among her haul of 12, Kerber has never found the conditions at Roland Garros to her liking.

“For me, of course, the (problem) is the movements, the sliding. Also the bounces, how the ball is bouncing, and how to play on clay,” she explained.

“It’s a little bit different to grass and to hard court, so it’s always a big challenge for me to have the patience to wait for the ball, to go through the balls.”

(Reporting by Julien Pretot; Editing by Pritha Sarkar)

Source: OANN

French Open - Roland Garros
Tennis – French Open – Roland Garros, Paris, France – May 26, 2019 Germany’s Angelique Kerber during her first round match against Russia’s Anastasia Potapova REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

May 26, 2019

By Julien Pretot

PARIS (Reuters) – Angelique Kerber’s campaign to complete a career slam was cut short in the French Open first round on Sunday, but that came as no surprise considering the former world number one was playing on her least favorite surface.

Add in a niggling ankle injury to her poor record on clay, there was little chance that the fifth-seeded German would win a tournament where she has never gone past the quarter-finals in 11 previous appearances.

She entered only two claycourt tournaments – in Stuttgart and Madrid – before arriving in Paris, winning only one match at each. An ankle injury meant the German aborted her Madrid Open challenge without hitting a ball in her second-round match.

“The year has been with up-and-downs and right now I lost here the first round, so what should I say?,” Kerber told reporters after being swept aside 6-4 6-2 on Court Philippe Chatrier by Russian Anastasia Potapova.

“Of course I’m disappointed, but I tried everything the last two weeks to be here to play a match, and I was happy about the process the last days, but at the end, I didn’t have real match practice.”

Kerber, who would have reclaimed the world number one ranking by lifting the Suzanne Lenglen Cup on June 8, did not really believe in her own chances.

“At the end I really didn’t have too much expectation for this tournament,” she admitted.

“I think the feeling I had before the tournament was right.”

Even though she owns three claycourt titles among her haul of 12, Kerber has never found the conditions at Roland Garros to her liking.

“For me, of course, the (problem) is the movements, the sliding. Also the bounces, how the ball is bouncing, and how to play on clay,” she explained.

“It’s a little bit different to grass and to hard court, so it’s always a big challenge for me to have the patience to wait for the ball, to go through the balls.”

(Reporting by Julien Pretot; Editing by Pritha Sarkar)

Source: OANN

French Open - Roland Garros
Tennis – French Open – Roland Garros, Paris, France – May 26, 2019 General view of Court Simonne-Mathieu during the first round match between Spain’s Garbine Muguruza and Taylor Townsend of the U.S. REUTERS/Vincent Kessler

May 26, 2019

By Julien Pretot

PARIS (Reuters) – At the heart of the Jardin des Serres botanical exhibition, Roland Garros’s new Simonne Mathieu court offers a green experience in tennis’ capital of red dirt.

Garbine Muguruza, the 2016 champion, fired down her serve shortly after 11am local time to christen the new court during her first round match against American Taylor Townsend in front of a 75%-filled stadium – a rarity for a French Open curtain raiser.

The Spaniard carved out a 5-7 6-2 6-2 win in the semi-sunken 5,000-seater arena, which has been constructed with a slick combination of glass and metal.

The court is surrounded by greenhouses featuring rare and tropical plants, giving fans and players a cocooning feel at the east end of Roland Garros.

With two 70-meter long structures stretching along the east and west stands and a couple of 40-metre long enclosures connected to the north and south stands around the concourses, the stadium has a view onto the botanical collections.

“It’s a double experience, it’s not just about sports, you can take the time to see the plants before watching a match. The whole thing is really pleasant and relaxing,” said Jean-Pierre, a 50-year-old spectator who declined to give his last name.

There was, however, no time to stroll around for 19th seed Muguruza, who was offered stiff resistance on a court named after former women’s tennis pioneer Simonne Mathieu who became a leading figure in the resistance during World War II.

Muguruza was unsettled by Townsend’s mix of power and finesse in the opening set before she finally dictated the pace and found her range, hammering a series of forehand winners to gain the upper hand.

“It’s a beautiful court, I took my time,” Muguruza smiled.

She next faces Swede Johanna Larsson.

(Reporting by Julien Pretot; Editing by Pritha Sarkar)

Source: OANN


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