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MLB: Boston Red Sox at Houston Astros
May 25, 2019; Houston, TX, USA; Houston Astros center fielder George Springer (4) looks on from the dugout during the fifth inning against the Boston Red Sox at Minute Maid Park. Mandatory Credit: Troy Taormina-USA TODAY Sports

May 26, 2019

The Houston Astros put star outfielder George Springer on the 10-day injured list on Saturday, a day after he strained his left hamstring while chasing a foul ball.

Springer had missed four games with a stiff lower back, then returned to action Friday in a 4-3 home win over the Boston Red Sox. But as he and two teammates chased a Xander Bogaerts foul ball in the eighth inning, Springer slid so that he wouldn’t collide with the wall and grabbed his hamstring.

He left the game then, limping off the field. He was 0-for-3 with a sacrifice fly on the night.

“Going for the ball, giving it as much as I can, and the hamstring locked up,” said Springer, who led the American League in homers (17), and RBIs (43) while batting .308 in 48 games going into Saturday’s game.

–The San Francisco Giants called up outfielder Mike Yastrzemski, grandson of Hall of Famer Carl Yastrzemski, before their game against the Arizona Diamondbacks.

The 28-year-old made his major league debut after more than 700 games over six-plus seasons in the minors.

Yastrzemski started in left field and went 0-for-3 with two strikeouts and a run scored in a 10-4 loss to Arizona.

–Dustin Pedroia left his rehab game Friday night because of discomfort, and the Boston Red Sox are bringing him back to the city for the team’s medical staff to look at his ailing left knee on Monday.

He had two at-bats for Double-A Portland on Friday before he pulled himself out of the game.

The second baseman, 35, has played in just nine games for the Red Sox in the 2018 and 2019 seasons.

–The Philadelphia Phillies placed right-handed reliever Pat Neshek on the 10-day injured list with a right shoulder strain.

Neshek, 38, is 0-1 with three saves and a 4.67 ERA in 19 bullpen appearances this season. The move is retroactive to Friday.

The Phillies also transferred right-hander David Robertson to the 60-day injured list and called up right-hander J.D. Hammer from Triple-A Lehigh Valley.

–The Diamondbacks recalled right-hander Taylor Clarke from Triple-A Reno and designated catcher John Ryan Murphy for assignment.

Clarke, 26, was brought up to start Saturday’s game at San Francisco and got the win, allowing three runs on six hits in 6 1/3 innings. He is 1-1 with a 2.93 ERA and one save in three appearances for Arizona this season.

Murphy, 28, is batting just .177 with four homers and seven RBIs in 25 games this season.

–The Chicago White Sox placed catcher Welington Castillo on the seven-day concussion list and promoted catcher Seby Zavala from Triple-A Charlotte.

Castillo left in the eighth inning of Friday’s 11-4 loss in Minnesota after taking two foul tips off his mask.

Castillo, 32, is batting just .176 with three homers and 10 RBIs in 26 games this season.

–The Los Angeles Angels placed right-hander Matt Harvey on the 10-day injured list due to an upper back strain.

The move comes two days after Harvey served up four homers and was hammered for eight runs and seven hits in just 2 2/3 innings against the Minnesota Twins.

The poor outing leaves the 30-year-old Harvey with a 2-4 record and 7.50 ERA in 10 starts this season.

–The Oakland Athletics designated struggling right-hander Fernando Rodney for assignment.

Rodney had a 9.42 ERA during 17 appearances this season. Opponents batted .345 against him in 14 1/3 innings.

The 42-year-old Rodney ranks 18th in major league history with 325 saves. He is 48-68 with a 3.79 ERA in 913 career appearances since 2002.

–Gerry Fraley, a veteran sportswriter who covered the Texas Rangers for three decades, passed away on Saturday morning after a lengthy cancer battle. He was 64.

Fraley spent the bulk of his career covering sports for the Dallas Morning News, taking up the Rangers beat in 1989.

“He covered this sport with a passion and intensity second to none,” a statement from the Rangers read. “He was as thorough as any writer in the game as was evidenced in his numerous contacts with players, coaches, baseball executives and scouts, and umpires.”

–Field Level Media

Source: OANN

PGA: Charles Schwab Challenge - Third Round
May 25, 2019; Fort Worth, TX, USA; Kevin Na walks to the 18th green atop the leaderboard by two strokes going into Sundays final round of the Charles Schwab Challenge golf tournament at Colonial Country Club. Mandatory Credit: Ray Carlin-USA TODAY Sports

May 25, 2019

(Reuters) – Kevin Na rebounded from a back-nine double-bogey to grab a two-stroke lead as Jordan Spieth moved into a tie for second after three rounds of the Charles Schwab Challenge in Fort Worth, Texas on Saturday.

Na shook off the double at the 11th hole to birdie the 13th on his way to a one-under par 69 at a Colonial Country Club layout made tough by breezy conditions.

While the birdies did not fall as frequently as they had on Friday when he shot 62, Na still had three in claiming the lead at nine-under 201.

Spieth continued his impressive putting to shoot 68 and tie with four others at seven under, Canadian Mackenzie Hughes (65), Taiwan’s Pan Cheng-tsung (68) and Americans Jim Furyk (68) and Tony Finau (71).

Pan, who goes by the initials C.T., had grabbed the lead after Na’s double, but bogeyed the 17th and 18th holes.

Sweden’s Jonas Blixt, the second-round leader by a stroke, was never in contention after a first-hole bogey. He shot a four-over 74 to drop to four strokes off the pace.

World number three Justin Rose, the defending champion, also turned in a 74 to sit at five over par after 54 holes.

(Reporting by Gene Cherry in Raleigh, North Carolina, editing by Ed Osmond)

Source: OANN

IndyCar: 103rd Running of the Indianapolis 500-Carb Day
May 24, 2019; Indianapolis, IN, USA; IndyCar Series driver Helio Castroneves during Carb Day practice for the 103rd Running of the Indianapolis 500 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Mandatory Credit: Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports

May 25, 2019

By Steve Keating

INDIANAPOLIS (Reuters) – If Tiger Woods can get back in the winners’ circle Helio Castroneves says he sees no reason he cannot return to Victory Lane at the Indianapolis 500 on Sunday and finally claim a place in the Brickyard’s most exclusive club.

In more than a century of racing at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (IMS) only three men — A.J. Foyt, Al Unser Sr. and Rick Mears — have won the 500 four times and with a win on Sunday Castroneves would become the first non-American to join that group.

Now on the downside of his career, the 44-year-old no longer drives full-time on the IndyCar Series but Roger Penske continues to give his long-time employee a competitive car and a chance to get his name on the Borg-Warner trophy again.

The bubbly Brazilian has always been a driver to take motivation from wherever he can find it and this week is drawing inspiration from Woods, who completed one of sport’s all-time great comebacks last month when he ended an 11-year major title drought with a stunning victory at the Masters.

“You know it took Tiger Woods 10 years to go back and win another big one so maybe it could be this year (for me),” said Castroneves. “You’re always looking for positive ways to look and I’m always a positive guy and realistic at the same time.

“I can only imagine how special it would be. At this point you can dream big but you still have to execute first.”

Castroneves was quick to put his mark on the Indy 500, winning on his Brickyard debut in 2001 and repeating in 2002.

It was seven years before he returned to Victory Lane in 2009 and he has not found his way back since, though he has twice come agonizingly close, finishing as runner-up in 2014 and 2017.

In 2014 Ryan Hunter-Reay denied Castroneves victory by 0.0600 seconds, the second-closest finish in race history.

Castroneves said it was the memory of 2017 that haunted him most, recalling how Japan’s Takuma Sato powered past him with five laps remaining then bravely fought off the Brazilian to take the checkered flag.

“It’s hard to forget the ones you’ve missed,” said Castroneves, who has looked right at home back in his Penzoil Team Penske Chevrolet, qualifying 12th fastest in the 33-car field.

“Obviously great memories of the ones that happened but the ones you’ve missed stay in your mind.

“I mean 2017 with Takuma was really tough; I did everything I could but he did a really great job.

“Hopefully I don’t have to think this year about being a close call and just make it happen.”

(Editing by Clare Fallon)

Source: OANN

IndyCar: 103rd Running of the Indianapolis 500-Drivers Meeting
May 25, 2019; Indianapolis, IN, USA; The 1969 Indy 500 winner Mario Andretti drives a golf cart after attending the drivers meeting for the 103rd Running of the Indianapolis 500 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Mandatory Credit: Brian Spurlock-USA TODAY Sports

May 25, 2019

By Steve Keating

INDIANAPOLIS (Reuters) – In the run-up to the Indianapolis 500 the spotlight has been on Mario Andretti but come Sunday it is grandson Marco in the crosshairs as he attempts to lift a family curse by returning a member of the clan to Victory Lane at the famed Brickyard.

As usual there are no shortage of high-octane storylines at the sprawling 2.5-mile oval but Marco Andretti’s bid to end a 50-year Brickyard barren stretch for American motor racing’s first family has dominated conversation.

In over a century of racing at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (IMS), it is doubtful there has ever been a more popular winner of what is unapologetically billed as “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing” than Mario Andretti.

On that Memorial Day holiday weekend in 1969 a dashing Andretti powered across the finish line to deliver a victory that still resonates today.

It wasn’t supposed to be that way.

The win was expected to be just the first of many at the famed Brickyard but a half-century later it stands alone.

Mario would never again reach Victory Lane and chug from the winner’s quart of milk.

Neither would his sons Michael or Jeff. Nor has his nephew John or grandson Marco, who will again carry the Andretti colours into Sunday’s race.

“Pressure? This is the biggest race in the world, with or without what’s going on,” said Marco, who qualified 10th and will start on the inside of Row Four. “I can’t even imagine if we were to book end it 50 years, it would be incredible.

“I think pressure is a good thing. I think you should be honored to carry pressure. It means you’re playing for something awesome.

“It’s almost 80 tries, we’re all still here and we’re able come back and keep trying to win it.”

Fernando Alonso’s attempt to complete motor racing’s Triple Crown of wins at Monaco, Le Mans and Indianapolis had taken some of the focus and pressure off of Andretti until the Spaniard’s qualifying flop last Sunday left the twice Formula One champion out of the race.

EXCLUSIVE CLUB

Charismatic Brazilian Helio Castroneves’s bid to claim a record-equalling fourth Indy 500 victory that would gain him entry in the Brickyard’s most exclusive club has been swept aside by a wave of Andretti nostalgia.

The possibility of Roger Penske adding an 18th win to his collection has also taken a back seat despite the captain rolling out an all-star stable including Castroneves, 2017 IndyCar Series champion Josef Newgarden, reigning Indy 500 winner Will Power and Simon Pagenaud, who will start Sunday’s race from pole position.

Such has been their cruel misfortune that the thinking is there could be no other explanation for the Andretti heartbreak than a curse (there is an entire Wikipedia page dedicated to the jinx).

Exactly what it is that so angered the racing gods is uncertain but the entire Andretti clan rejects the idea that there are malevolent forces at work.

Scoffing at any idea of a curse, Andretti, whose best Indy 500 finish came in his rookie year crossing second in 2006, will pay tribute to his grandfather by driving a car with the same day-glow red livery he used when winning in 1969.

Michael Andretti, winless at the Brickyard in 16 attempts as driver but five-times winner as a team owner, will put five cars on the grid including Marco and two former Indy 500 champions in Alexander Rossi and Ryan Hunter-Reay.

“I’ve had good shots to win the biggest race in the world and its eluded me numerous times,” said Marco, who has also had three third-place results. “I’m not going to change too much on the driver’s side for this race.

“Hopefully, our number is picked this year.”

(Editing by Ed Osmond)

Source: OANN

IndyCar: 103rd Running of the Indianapolis 500-Drivers Meeting
May 25, 2019; Indianapolis, IN, USA; The 1969 Indy 500 winner Mario Andretti drives a golf cart after attending the drivers meeting for the 103rd Running of the Indianapolis 500 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Mandatory Credit: Brian Spurlock-USA TODAY Sports

May 25, 2019

By Steve Keating

INDIANAPOLIS (Reuters) – In the run-up to the Indianapolis 500 the spotlight has been on Mario Andretti but come Sunday it is grandson Marco in the crosshairs as he attempts to lift a family curse by returning a member of the clan to Victory Lane at the famed Brickyard.

As usual there are no shortage of high-octane storylines at the sprawling 2.5-mile oval but Marco Andretti’s bid to end a 50-year Brickyard barren stretch for American motor racing’s first family has dominated conversation.

In over a century of racing at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (IMS), it is doubtful there has ever been a more popular winner of what is unapologetically billed as “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing” than Mario Andretti.

On that Memorial Day holiday weekend in 1969 a dashing Andretti powered across the finish line to deliver a victory that still resonates today.

It wasn’t supposed to be that way.

The win was expected to be just the first of many at the famed Brickyard but a half-century later it stands alone.

Mario would never again reach Victory Lane and chug from the winner’s quart of milk.

Neither would his sons Michael or Jeff. Nor has his nephew John or grandson Marco, who will again carry the Andretti colours into Sunday’s race.

“Pressure? This is the biggest race in the world, with or without what’s going on,” said Marco, who qualified 10th and will start on the inside of Row Four. “I can’t even imagine if we were to book end it 50 years, it would be incredible.

“I think pressure is a good thing. I think you should be honored to carry pressure. It means you’re playing for something awesome.

“It’s almost 80 tries, we’re all still here and we’re able come back and keep trying to win it.”

Fernando Alonso’s attempt to complete motor racing’s Triple Crown of wins at Monaco, Le Mans and Indianapolis had taken some of the focus and pressure off of Andretti until the Spaniard’s qualifying flop last Sunday left the twice Formula One champion out of the race.

EXCLUSIVE CLUB

Charismatic Brazilian Helio Castroneves’s bid to claim a record-equalling fourth Indy 500 victory that would gain him entry in the Brickyard’s most exclusive club has been swept aside by a wave of Andretti nostalgia.

The possibility of Roger Penske adding an 18th win to his collection has also taken a back seat despite the captain rolling out an all-star stable including Castroneves, 2017 IndyCar Series champion Josef Newgarden, reigning Indy 500 winner Will Power and Simon Pagenaud, who will start Sunday’s race from pole position.

Such has been their cruel misfortune that the thinking is there could be no other explanation for the Andretti heartbreak than a curse (there is an entire Wikipedia page dedicated to the jinx).

Exactly what it is that so angered the racing gods is uncertain but the entire Andretti clan rejects the idea that there are malevolent forces at work.

Scoffing at any idea of a curse, Andretti, whose best Indy 500 finish came in his rookie year crossing second in 2006, will pay tribute to his grandfather by driving a car with the same day-glow red livery he used when winning in 1969.

Michael Andretti, winless at the Brickyard in 16 attempts as driver but five-times winner as a team owner, will put five cars on the grid including Marco and two former Indy 500 champions in Alexander Rossi and Ryan Hunter-Reay.

“I’ve had good shots to win the biggest race in the world and its eluded me numerous times,” said Marco, who has also had three third-place results. “I’m not going to change too much on the driver’s side for this race.

“Hopefully, our number is picked this year.”

(Editing by Ed Osmond)

Source: OANN

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leading climatologist is warning that nearly all of the computer simulations at the heart of the predictions of catastrophic, man-made global warming cannot be trusted with respect to a key measure.

At a meeting in the Palace of Westminster in London, Professor John Christy of the University of Alabama in Huntsville told MPs and peers the climate models are way off in their predictions of rapid warming at high altitudes in the tropics.

“They all have rapid warming above 30,000 feet in the tropics – it’s effectively a diagnostic signal of greenhouse warming,” he said. “But in reality it’s just not happening. It’s warming up there, but at only about one third of the rate predicted by the models.”

Christy’s remarks were highlighted by the Global Warming Policy Foundation, a non-partisan think tank in London. The group says that while it is “open-minded on the contested science of global warming,” it is “deeply concerned about the costs and other implications of many of the policies currently being advocated.”

Christy said a similar discrepancy between empirical measurements and computer predictions has been confirmed at the global level.

Read more at https://www.wnd.com/2019/05/top-climatologist-our-models-cant-be-trusted/#eIZRXyWFaJf0Ru34.99

Image Credit: Real World Gardener

Spread the love

leading climatologist is warning that nearly all of the computer simulations at the heart of the predictions of catastrophic, man-made global warming cannot be trusted with respect to a key measure.

At a meeting in the Palace of Westminster in London, Professor John Christy of the University of Alabama in Huntsville told MPs and peers the climate models are way off in their predictions of rapid warming at high altitudes in the tropics.

“They all have rapid warming above 30,000 feet in the tropics – it’s effectively a diagnostic signal of greenhouse warming,” he said. “But in reality it’s just not happening. It’s warming up there, but at only about one third of the rate predicted by the models.”

Christy’s remarks were highlighted by the Global Warming Policy Foundation, a non-partisan think tank in London. The group says that while it is “open-minded on the contested science of global warming,” it is “deeply concerned about the costs and other implications of many of the policies currently being advocated.”

Christy said a similar discrepancy between empirical measurements and computer predictions has been confirmed at the global level.

Read more at https://www.wnd.com/2019/05/top-climatologist-our-models-cant-be-trusted/#eIZRXyWFaJf0Ru34.99

Image Credit: Real World Gardener

IndyCar: 103rd Running of the Indianapolis 500-Drivers Meeting
May 25, 2019; Indianapolis, IN, USA; All 33 NTT IndyCar series drivers starting in the 2019 Indianapolis 500 attend the drivers meeting for the 103rd Running of the Indianapolis 500 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Mandatory Credit: Brian Spurlock-USA TODAY Sports

May 25, 2019

The forecast for Sunday’s Indianapolis 500 calls for an 80-90 percent chance of rain, with thunderstorms throughout the day.

“I would just tell everyone to remember: This is Indiana,” Indianapolis Motor Speedway President Doug Boles said Saturday, referring to the state’s unpredictable weather.

IndyCar President Jay Frye told reporters that the race, schedule to begin at noon ET, could start as late as 6 p.m. because of the amount of daylight at this time of year.

The Indy 500 has been pushed back to Monday three times in 102 previous races, most recently in 1997. That year, more rain delayed the finish to Tuesday, with Arie Luyendyk finishing first.

The race becomes official after 101 laps of the scheduled 200-lap race. The last time it was shortened was 2007, when winner Dario Franchitti completed 166 laps before rain moved in.

The 2 1/2-mile track was resurfaced last year with a new sealant that helps water run off the track rather than soak in.

–Field Level Media

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: Tennis: Miami Open
FILE PHOTO: Mar 21, 2019; Miami Gardens, FL, USA; Bianca Andreescu of Canada hits a backhand against Irina-Camelia Begu of Romania (not pictured) in the first round of the Miami Open at Miami Open Tennis Complex. Mandatory Credit: Geoff Burke-USA TODAY Sports -/File Photo

May 25, 2019

By Martyn Herman

LONDON (Reuters) – Injury breaks are not usually welcomed by tennis players but when Bianca Andreescu’s shoulder began troubling her in Miami it offered her the chance to take stock of a stunning breakthrough.

The 18-year-old Canadian became the first wildcard to win the Indian Wells title the week before — a feat that shook the tennis world and had Rod Laver remarking that a star had been born.

Andreescu has only played in two Grand Slams and at the start of the year said just making the French Open main draw was her goal. She will debut as the 22nd seed.

When she takes on 20-year-old Czech Marie Bouzkova it will be her first match on clay this season and her first anywhere since a sore shoulder forced her to retire in her last 16 clash with Anett Kontaveit in Miami.

It ended the incredible 10-match winning streak that has catapulted the Ontario-born Andreescu into the big time.

“I think the injury helped me in the way that I could have the chance to let everything soak in and spend time with my family and friends,” Andreescu, whose exploits have trumped those of compatriots and close friends Denis Shapovalov and Felix Auger-Aliassime, told Reuters in a phone interview.

“I have amazing family and friends and they really helped me stay grounded because the media when I got home were all over me. It was certainly a different feeling but I’m getting used to it slowly but surely.”

Andreescu says her shoulder is ready to go in Paris, having opted to skip the warm-up tournaments and head to Mallorca to tune up her claycourt game at the Rafael Nadal Academy.

“I’m completely healed,” she said. “It was a wide decision because if I had continued the tear could have got worse.

“The facilities at Rafa’s academy were amazing, really good physios, really good food, the people were nice and they accommodated me really well.

“On my days off I could just stroll around and get my mind off the game and focus on relaxing which was really helpful. It was a good two-week period and I feel that I needed that.”

Andreescu, who moved back to her parents’ native Romania soon after she was born, says her career has been a “crazy ride” since returning to Canada to become part of the development program that produced Milos Raonic, Eugenie Bouchard, Auger-Aliassime and Shapovalov.

“Happy days for Canadian tennis,” she said. “We are just feeding off each other’s success and energy. I played juniors with Felix and Denis, we grew up together and just seeing them, all of us doing well at the same time, it’s just incredible.

“Tennis Canada is doing a great job. Without them I wouldn’t be here today. I’m so grateful. I can’t begin to repay them.”

TITLE RUN

Andreescu’s title run in Indian Wells began slowly but she soon got on a roll, beating seeds Dominica Cibulkova and Qiang Wang before obliterating former French Open and Wimbledon champion Garbine Muguruza 6-0 6-1.

In the final she downed reigning Wimbledon champion Angelique Kerber, banked the $1.3 million winner’s check and celebrated with a burger.

Her performances were likened to a more powerful version of Martina Hingis — full of variety and not just belting balls.

Naturally curious, Andreescu says finding different ways to win matches is her biggest strength.

“I’ve always been like, even as a junior,” she said. “I think I just get bored easy! I kept improving on that and its paying off. A lot of the players have only got one game style.

“I’m one of few that can give a variety of shots back and I think they don’t like that.”

Andreescu said her rise from ending 2018 ranked 178th to her current 22 is “a dream come true”.

“You get treated a bit differently, for sure,” she said. “And not having to go through qualifying for the French is so much better for body and mind.

“I can now use all my fuel for the first round.”

Unsurprisingly, she names Romanian Simona Halep as one of her inspirations, and said it was a chat with the current French Open champion in 2016 that launched her career.

“We shared a ride at the Rogers Cup in 2016 I asked her if she could give me one piece of advice. She told me I should stop playing juniors and focus on the pros.

“That was a really good decision.”

(Reporting by Martyn Herman, editing by Ed Osmond)

Source: OANN

Yellow Vest protesters marched in the streets of Paris for the 28th straight week against French President Emmanuel Macron’s globalist policies as the EU Parliamentary Elections are underway.

The marches have been mostly peaceful throughout France, but some police used teargas against protesters.

The Yellow Vest movement began in November 2018 over Macron’s plan to hike fuel prices in the name of combating “climate change.”

Macron said his party, the pro-European Republic On The Move party was facing an “existential risk”  against against Le Pen’s nationalist populist movement in the EU Election, which ends on Sunday.

So far, support for Le Pen’s party has edged out Macron’s in a 25% to 23% matchup, according to polls.

(Image Credit: @thewolfreports/Twitter)

Source: InfoWars


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