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Brazilian President Bolsonaro participates in Brazil-U.S. Business forum
FILE PHOTO: Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro participates in a Brazil-U.S. Business Council forum to discuss relations and future cooperation and engagement in Washington, U.S. March 18, 2019. REUTERS/Erin Scott

March 19, 2019

By Lisandra Paraguassu

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro endorsed U.S. President Donald Trump’s immigration agenda on the eve of their first meeting at the White House, saying he supports a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border and that most immigrants to the United States wish to do harm.

Bolsonaro, a far-right congressman who rode to the presidency with a brash, anti-establishment campaign modeled on Trump’s 2016 run, has pledged a new era of pro-American policy in the Southern Hemisphere’s second-largest country.

Ahead of Tuesday’s Oval Office meeting, Bolsonaro waived a visa requirement for U.S. visitors to Brazil and later in a Fox News interview on Monday night threw his weight behind Trump’s immigration agenda, which includes a wall on the Mexican border.

“We do agree with President Trump’s decision or proposal on the wall,” Bolsonaro said, in remarks translated to English by the broadcaster. “The vast majority of potential immigrants do not have good intentions. They do not intend to do the best or do good to the U.S. people.

“I would very much like the U.S. to uphold the current immigration policy, because to a large extent we owe our democracy in the Southern Hemisphere to the United States,” he said.

Bolsonaro, a former army captain, rose to power praising the U.S.-backed military government that ran Brazil for two decades before a return to democracy in 1985, echoing Cold War rhetoric in his presidential campaign about the need to fight a continued communist threat.

Since his inauguration in January, Bolsonaro also has adopted elements of Trump’s presidential style, including taunting political foes on Twitter and denouncing media coverage he does not like as “fake news.”

Although he did not get into specifics of his agenda in Washington, Bolsonaro said the presidents would discuss a deepening political and economic crisis in socialist Venezuela.

Bolsonaro said Brazil is the country most interested in seeing an end to the government of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, which he called a “drug trafficking dictatorship.”

In addition to their shared political agenda, Bolsonaro spoke hopefully of a blossoming friendship with Trump.

“I’m willing to open my heart up to him and do whatever is good, to the benefit of both the Brazilian and the American people,” Bolsonaro told Fox News.

(Writing and additional reporting by Marcelo Rochabrun; Editing by Brad Haynes and Bill Trott)

Source: OANN

David Hookstead | Reporter

Free agent receiver Jordy Nelson has no shortage of suitors.

Nelson was cut from the Oakland Raiders after they paid him $3 million, and it doesn’t sound like he’ll be out of a job for long. According to Adam Schefter, the former Packers star will visit the Seahawks on Tuesday. The Patriots, Titans, Chiefs and Raiders are also all reportedly interested.

Yes, the Raiders, the team that just cut him after paying him might want him back. What a bizarre situation. Notably, the Packers aren’t on the list. (RELATED: Packers QB Aaron Rodgers Says He Won’t Get Surgery On His Knee)

The Seahawks and Nelson could be a great fit. Russell Wilson needs a dependable receiver, and that’s exactly what the former Packers star can be.

He might not be the star he once was, but he’s still a workhorse of a dude. The Seahawks would be incredibly wise to get him as quickly as possible.

The exact same can be said of the Patriots. Tom Brady has the rare ability of squeezing the most out of everybody around him, and we all know New England is a premium destination for veterans searching for a ring.

Nelson would probably flourish under Bill Belichick and Tom Brady. He would provide a legit receiving threat to go along with Edelman.

It is a little surprising to see the Packers not on the list. You’d think Aaron Rodgers would absolutely want his former star back.

I guess not. It looks like Nelson will have to get paid elsewhere.

Follow David Hookstead on Twitter

Source: The Daily Caller

U.S. Republican House leaders speak after meeting with Trump at the White House in Washington
FILE PHOTO: Paul Ryan speaks after meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump at the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Young

March 19, 2019

(Reuters) – Fox Corp on Tuesday appointed former U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan, Chief Executive Officer of Formula One Group Chase Carey and two others to its board.

Carey served as president and chief operating officer from 2009 to 2015 at Twenty-First Century Fox.

The newly spun-off media company, which will mark a new phase for billionaire Rupert Murdoch’s media business, will debut on the Nasdaq on Tuesday.

(Reporting by Vibhuti Sharma; Editing by Arun Koyyur)

Source: OANN

Chris White | Energy Reporter

The brother of Jeff Bezos’s mistress sold racy text messages from the Amazon CEO to the National Enquirer, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday, citing anonymous sources familiar with the matter.

Michael Sanchez — the brother of Bezos’s lover, Lauren Sanchez — reportedly sold the billionaire’s secrets for $200,000 to the Enquirer’s publisher, American Media, the report notes. Michael denied sending the National Enquirer “the many penis selfies” but declined to comment about whether he sent the publication other photos of Bezos, according to WSJ.

The report appears to conflict with rumors that President Donald Trump was behind the caper.

Neither Bezos nor Lauren replied to requests from WSJ for comment. The story appears to conflict with media-generated rumors that the president or Saudi Arabia were behind the leaked text messages. (RELATED: Bezos Investigated An Expose Into His Affair And Now Thinks He Knows Who’s Responsible)

Longtime Bezos consultant, Gavin de Becker, suggested in February that reports about the billionaire’s relationship with Lauren, a former TV anchor, started with a “politically motivated” leak from Trump supporters. Bezos announced that he and his wife MacKenzie were divorcing in January, two days after American Media approached him about the texts.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump participates in a briefing on "drug trafficking on the southern border" in the Roosevelt Room at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 13, 2019. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump participates in a briefing on “drug trafficking on the southern border” in the Roosevelt Room at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 13, 2019. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo

Michael began conversations with the National Enquirer in 2018 about his sister’s relationship with Bezos, sources told WSJ. The Enquirer by then had already been following Bezos and Lauren, trying to determine whether the two were having an affair, sources claimed.

American Media CEO David Pecker was concerned that his connections with Trump would create the impression that the report was politically motivated. He was concerned Bezos would sue. Pecker and the company’s legal council, Cameron Stracher, argued during a lunch date in November 2018 about why Michael had been paid upfront for the texts.

Stratcher quit on the spot, sources said. His employment key card reportedly no longer functioned by the time he made the 10 minute walk back to American Media’s office.

Bezos struck back in February. He accused the National Enquirer’s parent company in a Feb. 7 blog post of trying to blackmail him with lewd photos of him and his mistress.

“I was made an offer I couldn’t refuse. Or at least that’s what the top people at the National Enquirer thought. I’m glad they thought that, because it emboldened them to put it all in writing,” Bezos wrote in a Medium post. “Rather than capitulate to extortion and blackmail, I’ve decided to publish exactly what they sent me, despite the personal cost and embarrassment they threaten.”

The billionaire owner of The Washington Post also pointed to his outlet’s coverage of the murder of Jamal Khashoggi as a potential reason for why people would target him. Subsequent reports have also noted that American Media once asked Saudi Arabian officials to invest in the company to stave off bankruptcy.

Follow Chris White on Facebook and Twitter

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Source: The Daily Caller

David Hookstead | Reporter

Johnny Manziel has finally addressed joining the Memphis Express in the Alliance of American Football.

Johnny Football joined the Express late Saturday night after being exiled from the CFL. Naturally, the hype train immediately began, and it sounds like he is ready to embrace it. (RELATED: Johnny Manziel Signs With The Memphis Express In The AAF)

“I’m just excited to get back to playing American football again. I’m excited to get back to the basics of football. I’ve been working out constantly, playing some golf in my spare time and living the offseason life. I’m excited to be around the guys and to get back on the field,” The former Montreal Alouettes quarterback said after his first practice with the team Monday.

That’s right, folks. We’re doing playing that crazy Canadian style of football. We’re balling out the way we were meant to. There are 11 guys on each side of the ball and a 100-yard field.

Last time I checked, that’s how this game was meant to be played.

The addition of Manziel is truly going to set the AAF on fire, and I can’t wait. TV ratings are going to go through the roof, a major name is immediately involved and that will draw the fans.

Could it end up being a disaster on the field? It could be, but I doubt it. Manziel played a full year up in the CFL last season. (RELATED: Johnny Manziel Shows Off Arm Strength)

He appears to be in prime shape and ready to roll. That’s what the fans want, and the AAF wants the fans to be engaged and interested.

He is supposed to be available to the media at length at some point today. Check back for more updates when we have them.

Follow David Hookstead on Twitter

Source: The Daily Caller

Phillip Stucky | Contributor

Former Vice President Joe Biden experienced a four-point bump over his previous standing with potential Democratic challengers should he join the 2020 presidential race, in a Morning Consult poll released Tuesday.

Biden leads with 35 percent of the vote, followed by Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders, who garnered 27 percent of the vote. Sen. Kamala Harris and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke were tied for third place with 8 percent. (RELATED: Biden Claims He Was A Desegregationist Despite Sordid History On Race)

US Senator of Vermont Bernie Sanders in Conway NH on August 24th 2015 by Michael VadonUS Senator of Vermont Bernie Sanders in Conway NH on August 24th 2015 by Michael Vadon

US Senator of Vermont Bernie Sanders in Conway NH on August 24th 2015 by Michael Vadon

The Morning Consult poll is released each week, and Biden increased his standing by four percentage points. Despite a wide-reaching media and ground campaign, O’Rourke only experienced a 1 percent increase in support in the poll. Harris lost two points in the poll this week.

Biden is not officially in the race, but he appeared to indicate his interest Saturday during a Democratic Party event in Dover, Delaware.

“I have the most progressive record of anyone running,” Biden said to raucous applause before correcting himself. “Anybody who would run — I didn’t mean it. Anybody who would run.”

Morning Consult polled 13,551 registered Democrats who self-reported they may vote in a Democratic primary or caucus in their state. The poll ran from March 11 through March 17 and had a margin of error of 1 percentage point in either direction.

Source: The Daily Caller

The Reserve Bank of India Governor Urjit Patel pauses during a news conference after a monetary policy review in Mumbai
FILE PHOTO: The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) Governor Urjit Patel pauses during a news conference after a monetary policy review in Mumbai, India, December 5, 2018. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas

March 19, 2019

By Suvashree Choudhury

MUMBAI (Reuters) – Economists raised concerns over a sharp slowdown in Indian economy and pitched for a monetary policy boost to support growth at a meeting with the nation’s central bank chief on Tuesday, according to three participants.

Reserve Bank of India Governor Shaktikanta Das met more than a dozen economists to get their views on the economy ahead of the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) decision due on April 4.

Most economists expect the six-member MPC to cut the repo rate by 25 basis points for the second time in a row next month to 6.00 percent, a level last seen in August 2017.

While the economists did not specify the extent of rate cut that the RBI could consider, one of them called for a 50-basis- point reduction, one of the participants said.

“Most of the participants said that monetary policy needs to do the heavy lifting to boost growth as there was no space for fiscal expansion,” another participant said.

The meeting under Das, who took charge in December, was in sharp contrast to the previous ones under former governor Urjit Patel, who was slightly reclusive and preferred to meet a small group of 5-6 economists. Das’ style has, however, been more open and communicative.

India’s economy expanded by 6.6 percent during October-December, its slowest pace in five quarters, on weak consumer demand and investments, dealing a major blow to Prime Minister Narendra Modi as he seeks a second term in office at a general election that kicks off next month.

Slowing growth has hit the federal government’s tax collections, constraining its ability to substantially boost spending ahead of elections.

However, neither Das nor any RBI official from the monetary policy department gave any indication of their thoughts or views, as is typical in such big-group meetings.

Economists and strategists spoke of several issues including drought, liquidity management, exchange rate, inflation, growth, bank credit growth, real interest rates and monetary policy transmission.

“The meeting went on for two-and-a-half hours as there were many participants,” said another economist who attended the meeting.

“But they didn’t say a single word on these topics.”

The RBI did not respond to an email seeking comment on the meeting with economists.

Some economists pointed out that food inflation could begin inching up after September if monsoon rains were not sufficient, but was unlikely to push retail inflation past the RBI’s 4 percent target.

Consumer inflation was at 2.57 percent on-year in February as food prices continued to fall for a fifth straight month.

The economists also raised concerns over a slowdown in global growth that has hurt India’s exports. India’s outbound shipments grew 2.4 percent annually in February, slower than 3.7 percent in January.

“Overall, the view was that the downside risks to growth have increased since the last policy while inflation risks have remained muted,” said a third participant.

“Not many of us clearly specified how much rate cut we wanted, but we presented the facts to make it clear to RBI that there was a need for a big boost to the economy.”

(Reporting by Suvashree Choudhury; Editing by Shreejay Sinha)

Source: OANN

King of fake news, CNN’s Jim Acosta giddied his way through a segment Monday where he pondered why the White House constantly has to deny that President Trump is a mentally unstable white supremacist.

At no point did it cross Acosta’s mind that it may be because the fake media is constantly claiming these things as part of its obstruction agenda.

“[W]hat does it say that the top aides are defending the President’s mental fitness and denying that he’s a white supremacist?” Acosta crowed, adding “These are pretty extraordinary defenses to be out there with.”

“In any other administration, you just wouldn’t hear that kind of thing being said by a chief of staff” Acosta declared.

Then again, with any other administration in the White House, Jim Acosta wouldn’t be cashing huge checks after labeling the President ‘the enemy of the people’ in a crapped out book aimed at those suffering rampant Trump derangement syndrome.

At this point, Acosta calling Trump mentally unstable is merely part of an advertisement campaign. Anyone still believing Acosta is a legitimate journalist needs to have their own mental stability assessed.

Acosta further questioned the President’s mind by pointing to tweets from George Conway’s attorney claiming Trump has a personality disorder.

“I don’t believe he is a psychiatrist, but he’s sharing his opinion that the President’s behavior, I guess, points to some kind instability he feels that — that we see here on a daily basis.”

Yeah, he’s not a psychiatrist, just like you’re not a journalist, Jim.

“I mean, it is just another day at the office for us over here at the White House in terms of trying to address these sorts of questions.” Acosta added.

And it was another day in the office over at MSNBC also, where the Deadline panel declared that Trump’s tweets are a sign of  “crisis level psychological duress” brought on from a fear based mental “spasm”.

“There are these spasms he has where he starts tweeting this crazy stuff.” claimed former Republican campaign advisor Mike Murphy.

“I’m not sure what the cause is [rampant biased media attacks?] but we have become so dulled to Trump’s madness, I don’t know what it will take. Does he have to go run around for an aluminum foil hat? He is clearly under psychological duress here. And it, I think, is a crisis level event.” Murphy added.

If anyone needs a reference of what a mental spasm looks like, watch the video of this outburst:

Source: InfoWars

Al Noor mosque shooting survivor Farhid Ahmed poses with a photo of his wife Husna, who was killed in the attack, after an interview with Reuters in Christchurch, New Zealand
Al Noor mosque shooting survivor Farhid Ahmed poses with a photo of his wife Husna, who was killed in the attack, after an interview with Reuters in Christchurch, New Zealand March 18, 2019. Picture taken March 18, 2019. REUTERS/Edgar Su TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

March 19, 2019

By Charlotte Greenfield and Tom Westbrook

CHRISTCHURCH, New Zealand (Reuters) – Husna Ahmed was 19 when she arrived in New Zealand from Bangladesh on her wedding day. Waiting to meet her was Farid, the man she would marry in a few hours, as their families had agreed.

A quarter of a century later, the life they had built together was torn apart at the Al Noor mosque in Christchurch when a gunman walked into the building, firing on worshippers at Friday prayers.

Husna encountered the gunman on his way out of the mosque. He shot her on the footpath. She fell and he fired two more shots, killing her instantly.

Farid, who uses a wheelchair after an earlier accident, was talking to a friend and was delayed from joining worshippers at his usual spot at the front of the mosque, instead praying in a small side room.

He managed to escape when he heard the shooting begin, returning when the gunman left, to find many of his friends and community members dead and comfort those who were dying.

Farid found out about his wife’s death when a detective he knew called his niece as they waited outside the mosque.

She passed the phone: “I don’t want you to wait the whole night, Farid. Go home, she will not come,” Farid said the detective told him.

“At the moment I hear that, my response was I felt numb,” Farid told Reuters. “I had tears but I didn’t break down.” His niece crumbled.

A total of 50 people were killed in the rampage, with as many wounded, as the gunman went from Al Noor to another mosque in the South Island city.

Most victims were migrants or refugees from countries including Pakistan, India, Malaysia, Syria, Turkey, Somalia and Afghanistan.

Husna was one of five members of a growing but tight-knit Bangladeshi community killed, according to the Bangladesh consul in New Zealand, Shafiqur Rahman Bhuiyan. Four others were wounded, one critically, he added.

Members of the Bangladesh cricket team, in town for a test match against New Zealand, narrowly avoided the carnage, turning up at the Al Noor mosque soon after the attack took place.

Based on what eyewitnesses told him, Farid said instead of hiding, Husna helped women and children inside the mosque and ran to the front of the building to look for him.

“She’s such a person who always put other people first and she was even not afraid to give her life saving other people,” Farid said.

Australian Brenton Tarrant, 28, a suspected white supremacist, has been charged with murder. He entered no plea and police said he is likely to face more charges.

The slaughter has rocked Christchurch, and New Zealand, to its core, blanketing the city in grief and driving Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern to promise swift gun law reform.

Farid said he had forgiven his wife’s killer.

“I want to give the message to the person who did this, or if he has any friends who also think like this: I still love you,” Farid said. “I want to hug you and I want to tell him in face that I am talking from my heart. I have no grudge against you, I never hated you, I will never hate you.”

LIKE A MOTHER

A few hours after the massacre as evening fell, the front room of Farid’s home in a sleepy Christchurch suburb where he runs a homeopathy business was full with survivors and friends grieving for a woman many described as like a mother to them.

Husna was born on 12 October in 1974 in Sylhet, a city on the banks the Surma River, in northeastern Bangladesh. She was so fast that Shahzalal Junior High School would only let her run three races, to give her rivals a chance, Farid said.

She moved to New Zealand in 1994.

Thin, nervous and overwhelmed by leaving everyone she knew for a new life in an alien country, she burst into tears when her husband-to-be picked her up from Auckland airport.

He comforted her on the long drive back to Nelson, where he was living, and where she quickly found her feet.

With almost no other Bangladeshis in the small city, Husna made English-speaking friends and learned the language within six months. Farid said she spoke it with more of a Kiwi accent than he did.

When Farid’s workmates at a meatpacking plant agreed to work half an hour longer on Fridays so he could take a break to pray, she cooked them a feast every week in thanks.

And when Farid was partially paralyzed after being run over by a car outside his house, after four years of marriage, she moved with him to Christchurch and became his nurse.

“Our hobby was we used to talk to each other. A lot. And we never felt bored,” he said.

REBUILDING CHRISTCHURCH

When Christchurch was razed by a deadly earthquake in 2011, Husna helped settle an influx of Bangladeshi migrants – qualified engineers, metalworkers and builders – who came to assist the rebuilding of the shattered city.

Mohammad Omar Faruk, 36, was one of the new arrivals. Faruk was working as a welder in Singapore but leapt at the opportunity to come to New Zealand where working conditions were better and permanent residency was possible.

Faruk was also killed at Al Noor mosque.

His employer, Rob van Peer, said he had allowed his team to leave early last Friday after they finished a job by lunchtime, meaning Faruk could attend Friday prayers.

Van Peer said Faruk was loved by his colleagues for his loyal and friendly personality and fast, precise welds.

Zakaria Bhuiyan, a welder at another engineering firm, also died. Newly married, he was waiting for a visitor visa so his wife could travel from Bangladesh.

Mojammel Haque worked as a dentist in Bangladesh and was studying in New Zealand for an advanced medical qualification when he was killed.

All three men knew Husna, said Mojibur Rahman, a welder and former flatmate of Faruk.

“It’s really hard because we are a little community but everyone’s living here in unity, we know each other, we share everything with each together,” he said. “Now I don’t know what’s going to happen, how we become normal.”

The fifth Bangladeshi victim was Abus Samad, 66, a former faculty member of Bangladesh Agriculture University who had been teaching at Christchurch’s Lincoln University.

CUSTOMS AND CARE

Many new workers to Christchurch brought young families, or were starting them and Husna took it upon herself to care for women through their pregnancies, often waking Farid at all hours so he could drive her to the births.

“We think she’s like a mother…if there’s something we needed, we go to Husna,” said Mohammed Jahangir Alan, another welder.

Husna guided his wife, then 19, to a midwife and a doctor and joined her in the delivery room as she gave birth to a baby girl, Alan said.

A few days later Husna shaved the infant’s head, an Islamic ritual which she did for dozens of children in the community. She was so gentle the baby fell asleep while she pulled the razor over the soft skin.

Husna would also lead the customary washing and prayer ritual for women who died. She was due to lead a workshop the day after her death to teach other women the process.

Now, Husna’s devastated female family members will wash her for her funeral, expected later this week.

“We know she would just want us to be a part of it, to wash her,” said her sister-in-law Ayesha Corner.

After the burial, Farid says he wants to continue the work he and his wife used to do and to care for their 15-year-old daughter.

When the lockdown at her school lifted on Friday, their daughter returned home, knowing only her mother was missing and asking where she was.

“I didn’t miss a second, I said: ‘She is with God,’” Farid said.

“She said: ‘You are lying’. She said: ‘Are you telling me I don’t have a mother?’”

“I said: ‘Yes, but I am your mother now and I am your father…we have to change the roles.”

(Reporting by Charlotte Greenfield and Tom Westbrook in CHRISTCHURCH; Additional reporting by Ruma Paul in DHAKA; Editing by Lincoln Feast)

Source: OANN

Twitter has admitted to shadowbanning a tweet by The Federalist co-founder Sean Davis in order to “keep people safe.” 

Tweeting a passage last week from former FBI attorney Lisa Page’s Congressional testimony discussing the FBI’s rush to find connections between the Trump campaign and Russia, Davis pointed out the irony of Hillary Clinton’s campaign employing former UK spy Christopher Steele, a foreign national, “working with Russians to obtain damaging information about Donald Trump.” 

Of note, the dossier Steele compiled which was subsequently used to obtain a warrant to spy on a Trump adviser (and later smear Trump) relied on a “senior Russian Foreign Ministry figure” and “a former top level intelligence officer still active in the Kremlin,” according to Vanity Fair.

Following his March 12 tweet, Davis wondered if Twitter was experimenting with “shadow bans” – as he could only see his tweet if he was logged in, meaning nobody else could see it.

Alex Jones exposes the massive push around the globe to use corporate media to use the New Zealand shooting to smear patriots.

Six days later, Twitter confirmed with Davis that they had deliberately shadow-banned his tweet in order to “keep people safe.”

“Twitter gave me no notice or explanation when it shadowbanned one of my Tweets about Russian interference in our elections,” wrote Davis, adding “But what’s worse is how Twitter apparently gives its users the fraudulent impression that their tweets, which Twitter secretly bans, are still public.”

In short, Twitter did not want the public to consider the irony of Hillary Clinton’s campaign paying for a foreign national to collude with Russians against Donald Trump, while the FBI scrambled to prove the Trump campaign did.

Unreal.

In other censorship news, ZeroHedge is now banned in New Zealand and much of Australia following our reporting on the Christchurch terror attacks.

Sorry citizen, some facts are just too dangerous for your own good.

Source: InfoWars


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