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Ice Hockey World Championships - Final - Canada v Finland
Ice Hockey World Championships – Final – Canada v Finland – Ondrej Nepela Arena, Bratislava, Slovakia – May 26, 2019 Finland’s players celebrate after winning the World Championship. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

May 26, 2019

BRATISLAVA (Reuters) – Finland completed a fairytale world championship after they came from behind to beat favorites Canada 3-1 and clinch their third gold medal in an absorbing final on Sunday.

The Finns, who beat the Canadians by the same score in their opening group-stage match, were underdogs in all three knockout stage games but they defied the odds to shock 2018 champions Sweden, Russia and Canada en route to the title.

It was a case of history repeating itself for the battling Finns, who won their previous title at the same venue in 2011.

Canada, who were aiming for a record 27th title, dominated the opening period as Shea Theodor fired them ahead midway through with a brilliant solo effort.

The Vegas Golden Knights defenseman weaved his way through three Finnish players and found the top corner with a superb wrist-shot after Oliwer Kaski had missed a penalty for Finland.

Canada hit the crossbar twice and those misses, coupled with lapses in concentration early in the second and third periods, cost them dearly.

Finland captain Marko Antilla, who scored the winner in the 1-0 semi-final win over Russia, was instrumental again as he leveled two minutes and 35 seconds into the second period when he beat goaltender Matt Muray with a fizzing low shot.

At exactly the same point in the third period, the towering Anttila punished the Canadians again as he popped up in front of goal and swept a fine Veli-Matti Savinainen assist into the roof of the net.

Harri Pesonen sealed Finland’s memorable win in the closing stages and the Canadians failed to create much up front in the dying minutes although they threw men forward in the Ondrej Nepela Arena.

Earlier on Sunday, Russia won the bronze medal with a penalty shootout win over the Czech Republic as the match finished 2-2 after regulation and overtime.

Nikita Gusev and Ilya Kovalchuk netted Russia’s goals in the shootout as the Czechs, who had led 2-1 in regular time after falling behind early on, missed all of their four attempts.

(Writing by Zoran Milosavljevic; Editing by Toby Davis)

Source: OANN

Ice Hockey World Championships - Final - Canada v Finland
Ice Hockey World Championships – Final – Canada v Finland – Ondrej Nepela Arena, Bratislava, Slovakia – May 26, 2019 Finland’s players celebrate after winning the World Championship. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

May 26, 2019

BRATISLAVA (Reuters) – Finland completed a fairytale world championship after they came from behind to beat favorites Canada 3-1 and clinch their third gold medal in an absorbing final on Sunday.

The Finns, who beat the Canadians by the same score in their opening group-stage match, were underdogs in all three knockout stage games but they defied the odds to shock 2018 champions Sweden, Russia and Canada en route to the title.

It was a case of history repeating itself for the battling Finns, who won their previous title at the same venue in 2011.

Canada, who were aiming for a record 27th title, dominated the opening period as Shea Theodor fired them ahead midway through with a brilliant solo effort.

The Vegas Golden Knights defenseman weaved his way through three Finnish players and found the top corner with a superb wrist-shot after Oliwer Kaski had missed a penalty for Finland.

Canada hit the crossbar twice and those misses, coupled with lapses in concentration early in the second and third periods, cost them dearly.

Finland captain Marko Antilla, who scored the winner in the 1-0 semi-final win over Russia, was instrumental again as he leveled two minutes and 35 seconds into the second period when he beat goaltender Matt Muray with a fizzing low shot.

At exactly the same point in the third period, the towering Anttila punished the Canadians again as he popped up in front of goal and swept a fine Veli-Matti Savinainen assist into the roof of the net.

Harri Pesonen sealed Finland’s memorable win in the closing stages and the Canadians failed to create much up front in the dying minutes although they threw men forward in the Ondrej Nepela Arena.

Earlier on Sunday, Russia won the bronze medal with a penalty shootout win over the Czech Republic as the match finished 2-2 after regulation and overtime.

Nikita Gusev and Ilya Kovalchuk netted Russia’s goals in the shootout as the Czechs, who had led 2-1 in regular time after falling behind early on, missed all of their four attempts.

(Writing by Zoran Milosavljevic; Editing by Toby Davis)

Source: OANN

Ice Hockey World Championships - Final - Canada v Finland
Ice Hockey World Championships – Final – Canada v Finland – Ondrej Nepela Arena, Bratislava, Slovakia – May 26, 2019 Finland’s players celebrate after winning the World Championship. REUTERS/Vasily Fedosenko

May 26, 2019

BRATISLAVA (Reuters) – Finland completed a fairytale world championship after they came from behind to beat favorites Canada 3-1 and clinch their third gold medal in an absorbing final on Sunday.

The Finns, who beat the Canadians by the same score in their opening group-stage match, were underdogs in all three knockout stage games but they defied the odds to shock 2018 champions Sweden, Russia and Canada en route to the title.

It was a case of history repeating itself for the battling Finns, who won their previous title at the same venue in 2011.

Canada, who were aiming for a record 27th title, dominated the opening period as Shea Theodor fired them ahead midway through with a brilliant solo effort.

The Vegas Golden Knights defenseman weaved his way through three Finnish players and found the top corner with a superb wrist-shot after Oliwer Kaski had missed a penalty for Finland.

Canada hit the crossbar twice and those misses, coupled with lapses in concentration early in the second and third periods, cost them dearly.

Finland captain Marko Antilla, who scored the winner in the 1-0 semi-final win over Russia, was instrumental again as he leveled two minutes and 35 seconds into the second period when he beat goaltender Matt Muray with a fizzing low shot.

At exactly the same point in the third period, the towering Anttila punished the Canadians again as he popped up in front of goal and swept a fine Veli-Matti Savinainen assist into the roof of the net.

Harri Pesonen sealed Finland’s memorable win in the closing stages and the Canadians failed to create much up front in the dying minutes although they threw men forward in the Ondrej Nepela Arena.

Earlier on Sunday, Russia won the bronze medal with a penalty shootout win over the Czech Republic as the match finished 2-2 after regulation and overtime.

Nikita Gusev and Ilya Kovalchuk netted Russia’s goals in the shootout as the Czechs, who had led 2-1 in regular time after falling behind early on, missed all of their four attempts.

(Writing by Zoran Milosavljevic; Editing by Toby Davis)

Source: OANN

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Yesterday, prolific tweeters Brian and Ed Krassenstein were banned for life from the platform for allegedly operating fake accounts and trying to buy clout. The two brothers then took to The Hill Reporter to plead their innocence and mount a defense, which relied in part on their past enthusiasm for the Ouya.

The Ouya was an Android-based video game console shaped like a metal cube that raised $8,596,475 on Kickstarter in 2012 but years later ended up a massive failure.

As for the Krassensteins, they’ve been ubiquitous presences in the mentions of President Trump’s Tweets. The Krassenstein twins rose to prominence on the social media platform by quickly responding to Donald Trump’s tweets with timeless dunks like, “Three weeks ago you told us that Isis was defeated in Syria. What happened?”

They’ve occasionally tried to spin this popularity into gold, most notably by selling a children’s book about the Robert Mueller investigation which featured the former Special Counsel as a super buff, shirtless cartoon character. But something about the pair’s popularity never quite added up. Now, according to Twitter, that’s because it was mostly a scam, a characterization the two rejected in an op-ed posted to their news blog late yesterday. Twitter claims the duo operated “multiple fake accounts” and purchased account interactions. “Engaging in these behaviors will result in permanent suspension from the service,” the platform said in a statement.

Read More:
https://kotaku.com/anti-trump-resistance-scammers-who-got-banned-from-twit-1835011953

Image Credit: Beyond MLM


The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Boston’s Dorchester neighborhood was vandalized Thursday night by a suspect who drew swastikas on monuments, threw American flags in a creek and ripped bushes from the earth.

Surveillance video shows an image of the person suspected of committing the vandalism just days before Memorial Day.

Watch below as a crew takes American flags out of the muddy water.

President of the Dorchester Vietnam Memorial Committee Joe Zinck said, “It’s very frustrating. Unless we find the person and talk to them we might never know why they chose this site to do it, because I don’t think it was a random act.”

According to Zinck, the suspect ripped over 100 flags from the ground and pulled bushes and shrubs out, throwing them into a nearby wooded area.

“It’s a sickness, a disease, deranged,” he said.

A local resident noted that the vandalism comes days before Gold Star families are set to descend on the grounds to pay tribute the the fallen soldiers for Memorial Day.

Police are investigating the incident, which is similar to another attack on the memorial in October.

Last fall, a granite obelisk at the memorial was torn apart when a suspect threw bricks at it.

The individual from the October incident also cut up an American flag and took a Massachusetts flag off its pole and covered it in trash.

The memorial is in honor of 80 servicemen who were killed during the Vietnam War and sits on a space owned by the University of Massachusetts Boston.

Source: InfoWars

FILE PHOTO: The Boeing logo is pictured at the LABACE fair in Sao Paulo
FILE PHOTO: The Boeing logo is pictured at the Latin American Business Aviation Conference & Exhibition fair (LABACE) at Congonhas Airport in Sao Paulo, Brazil August 14, 2018. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/File Photo

May 23, 2019

By Marcelo Rochabrun

SAO PAULO (Reuters) – Boeing Co on Thursday said that after taking over Brazilian planemaker Embraer SA’s passenger jet unit, it will call the division Boeing Brasil – Commercial, dropping one of Brazil’s most iconic company names.

The name change comes after Boeing agreed to pay $4.2 billion to buy 80% of Embraer’s operation making passenger jets with fewer than 150 seats. Embraer will retain a 20% stake. That division is still Embraer’s most profitable and considered a gold standard of Brazilian engineering.

Boeing has not made a decision yet about whether to rebrand the small and mid-sized planes, which currently carry the Embraer name followed by a model code.

The new corporate name underscores a realignment of the global aerospace industry in which two dominant manufacturers – Boeing and Airbus SE – strengthened their duopoly in the $150 billion jet market by absorbing weaker challengers.

After Airbus SE took a controlling stake in the CSeries division of Bombardier Inc, which competes directly with Embraer’s commercial jets, it rebranded the planes Airbus A220, in line with the branding of other Airbus planes.

The twin takeovers effectively halted the aerospace ambitions of Canada and Brazil and left China as the main threat to the transatlantic duopoly, with Russia and Japan making slower inroads, analysts said.

The Embraer name holds special meaning in Brazil, evoking its founding in 1969 as a state-run company that grew into a national champion and was privatized in 1994. Embraer is short for Empresa Brasileira de Aeronáutica or Brazilian Aeronautics Company.

After the deal with Boeing, Embraer will still exist as a company focused on executive jets and defense. The deal with Boeing has been approved by shareholders but is still waiting on regulatory approval.

(Reporting by Marcelo Rochabrun; Editing by Brad Haynes and Cynthia Osterman)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: The Boeing logo is pictured at the LABACE fair in Sao Paulo
FILE PHOTO: The Boeing logo is pictured at the Latin American Business Aviation Conference & Exhibition fair (LABACE) at Congonhas Airport in Sao Paulo, Brazil August 14, 2018. REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/File Photo

May 23, 2019

By Marcelo Rochabrun

SAO PAULO (Reuters) – Boeing Co on Thursday said that after taking over Brazilian planemaker Embraer SA’s passenger jet unit, it will call the division Boeing Brasil – Commercial, dropping one of Brazil’s most iconic company names.

The name change comes after Boeing agreed to pay $4.2 billion to buy 80% of Embraer’s operation making passenger jets with fewer than 150 seats. Embraer will retain a 20% stake. That division is still Embraer’s most profitable and considered a gold standard of Brazilian engineering.

Boeing has not made a decision yet about whether to rebrand the small and mid-sized planes, which currently carry the Embraer name followed by a model code.

The new corporate name underscores a realignment of the global aerospace industry in which two dominant manufacturers – Boeing and Airbus SE – strengthened their duopoly in the $150 billion jet market by absorbing weaker challengers.

After Airbus SE took a controlling stake in the CSeries division of Bombardier Inc, which competes directly with Embraer’s commercial jets, it rebranded the planes Airbus A220, in line with the branding of other Airbus planes.

The twin takeovers effectively halted the aerospace ambitions of Canada and Brazil and left China as the main threat to the transatlantic duopoly, with Russia and Japan making slower inroads, analysts said.

The Embraer name holds special meaning in Brazil, evoking its founding in 1969 as a state-run company that grew into a national champion and was privatized in 1994. Embraer is short for Empresa Brasileira de Aeronáutica or Brazilian Aeronautics Company.

After the deal with Boeing, Embraer will still exist as a company focused on executive jets and defense. The deal with Boeing has been approved by shareholders but is still waiting on regulatory approval.

(Reporting by Marcelo Rochabrun; Editing by Brad Haynes and Cynthia Osterman)

Source: OANN

Formula One F1 - Monaco Grand Prix
Motoracing – Formula One F1 – Monaco Grand Prix – Circuit de Monaco, Monte Carlo, Monaco – May 24, 2018 Jackie Stewart looks on before practice REUTERS/Benoit Tessier

May 23, 2019

By Alan Baldwin

MONACO (Reuters) – Jackie Stewart expects it to be business as usual on track for Lewis Hamilton in Sunday’s Monaco Grand Prix despite the Mercedes driver’s grief at the death of Formula One great Niki Lauda.

The 79-year-old, a triple world champion and Britain’s most successful racer before Hamilton, told reporters in the harborside paddock that it was all about focus.

“Mind management is what I lived with, and I think it’s why I am alive today,” said the Scot, who this year celebrates the 50th anniversary of his first title.

“In my day there were so many deaths. At one point, one in three of us were going to die. I lost 57 people who were my friends.

“In those days, you had to manage that mentally in a very strict way. I suspect Lewis will handle it in exactly the same way as I would have done.”

Lauda, the Mercedes non-executive chairman who won championships with Ferrari and McLaren in 1975, 1977 and 1984, died on Monday aged 70.

Mercedes employees are wearing black armbands, with the cars carrying messages in his memory.

The Austrian and Hamilton were close, with Lauda instrumental in the Briton’s move from McLaren to Mercedes in 2013. Hamilton has been excused his usual media duties until the weekend.

Stewart agreed a victory in Monaco, where Lauda won twice for Ferrari, would be a fitting tribute even if he doubted the famously blunt Austrian would have cared about that.

“When you get in the cockpit, and the lights go out, you are a racing driver and driving a motor car which is the most sophisticated piece of motor engineering in the world.

“To take that to it’s absolute limit, Lewis Hamilton is totally capable of doing that this weekend in qualifying and in the race.”

Stewart recalled how he had felt in 1970 when he had to get back in the car 45 minutes after another Austrian friend of his, the sport’s only posthumous champion Jochen Rindt, was killed in practice at Monza.

“I will never forget it for the rest of my life,” he said. “I was crying when I got into the car, and I cried when I got out of the car, but I put in the fastest lap that I had ever done at Monza.

“People in the media said it was a death wish but it wasn’t. It was just removing the bad bit. But the bad bits came back as soon as you stop the car,” added Stewart.

“It’s not being selfish, not caring, it’s just that you’ve got a job to do and you do it. And I should think Lewis Hamilton’s got all the skills and talent to just do the same.”

Hamilton, a two-times winner in Monaco, was fastest in both practice sessions on Friday.

Stewart was speaking at the presentation of a one kilo gold coin featuring his likeness and donated by Rosland Capital for an auction on Friday to benefit his “Race against Dementia” charity.

(Reporting by Alan Baldwin, editing by Ed Osmond)

Source: OANN

Russia once again added to its growing gold reserves in April, buying another 15.55 tons of the yellow metal. According to a press release from the Central Bank of Russia, it now holds 2,183.46 tons of gold.

Russia has expanded its gold holdings by 71.53 tons through the first four months of 2019. Russian gold reserves increased 274.3 tons in 2018, marking the fourth consecutive year of plus-200 ton growth. Meanwhile, the Russians sold off nearly all of its US Treasury holdings. According to Bank of America analysts,  the amount of US dollars in Russian reserves fell from 46% to 22% in 2018.

In an appearance on RT, Peter Schiff said he thinks the Russians are preparing for an impending dollar crisis.

As Peter explained, the world has been on a dollar standard ever since the US led the world off the gold standard.

“That was fine when the dollar was backed by gold, but now the dollar is backed by nothing. So, if you’re backing your currency with a currency that’s backed by nothing, well, then your currency is backed by nothing.”

Peter said this wasn’t a problem when people perceived value in the dollar, but he thinks that’s going to change.

“I think the next recession when the Fed goes back to zero and when we launch QE4, I think the dollar’s role as a reserve currency is going to be questioned, and central banks need an alternative. And the only viable alternative to back up their own currency is real money, which is gold.”

Peter also talked about the fact that the US uses the dollar as a weapon.

“Other countries don’t like this, and to the extent that they can move away from the dollar, well then they kill two birds with one stone. And one way of doing that is to increase their gold reserves now while gold is still cheap. Because when the dollar really starts to tank, the price of gold is going to soar. Russia, right now, obviously wants to buy as much gold as it can while the price is still relatively cheap. That allows it to build up a bigger hoard of gold to replace the diminished value that the dollar is going to play as a reserve currency.”

(Photo by Andrzej Barabasz / Wikimedia Commons)

China has also been buying gold. Peter said this is one way for the Chinese to gain leverage in the trade war. They can strengthen the yuan by selling dollarsand buying gold.

“That would help increase the value of the yuan and that would help increase the purchasing power of their own citizens while really dealing a fatal blow to the dollar and the US economy at the same time.”

The RT anchor asked if it was really possible for other countries to actually ditch the US dollar. Peter said it’s not only possible, it’s inevitable.

“Ultimately, the US won’t have any leverage at all … This [the dollar as the reserve currency] was an exorbitant privilege that the US has enjoyed for decades, but it has abused that privilege dramatically, even more so recently with the sanctions. So, I think that privilege is going to be lost and with it will go the artificially high standard of living that came along with it in the United States.”

Alex Jones explains how MSM hid the real march of globalism until after Hillary lost the election.

Source: InfoWars

FILE PHOTO: Women's FA Cup Final - West Ham United v Manchester City
FILE PHOTO: Soccer Football – Women’s FA Cup Final – West Ham United v Manchester City – Wembley Stadium, London, Britain – May 4, 2019 England coach Phil Neville pitchside before the match. Action Images via Reuters/Peter Cziborra/File Photo

May 23, 2019

By Philip O’Connor

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) – With the majority of the 24 teams at the Women’s World Cup coached by men, the game needs to embrace the wealth of experience that female soccer coaches have to offer, former United States and Sweden coach Pia Sundhage told Reuters.

Only nine teams at next month’s World Cup in France will have female coaches and Sundhage said this is limiting the development of the women’s game and opportunities for women in general.

“Every woman that I have met in football has been at a very high level as a player, playing at the World Cup, the Euros and the Olympics, and they have been involved for a long time,” she said in an interview ahead of the finals starting on June 7.

“Naturally, it’s an advantage if we have more women than we have at the moment, as it’s a job. If you’re a player, your chance to become a coach increases if there are more jobs.

“But if we choose what we have always chosen, which is very often men, then you see past that woman. And what happens then is you miss out on a lot of knowledge and competence.”

Sundhage scored 71 goals in 146 games for Sweden, moving on to coaching club sides in her homeland and America before accepting a role as an assistant with the Chinese national side, which in turn led to the head coaching job with the U.S.

The 59-year-old former striker coached the American women to Olympic gold in 2008 and 2012 and a runners-up spot at the 2011 World Cup before taking over her native Sweden and winning Olympic silver in 2016.

NEVER APPROACHED

Despite her success, Sundhage said she was never approached by a men’s team.

“All of the places I’ve been, I’ve been asked – I’ve never had an offer from men’s football, and I haven’t really looked for one either. I’ve had great jobs where I have always been asked to take the next step,” she said.

Sundhage is hoping 2019 will be the year women’s football finally breaks into the mainstream, but she remains slightly skeptical.

“I’ve been part of so many breakthroughs. The football is getting better and better and the crowds are getting bigger, but it takes time to filter down to club level and to media and fans following it on a daily basis,” she said.

Now working with Sweden’s under-17 team, Sundhage is a sought-after speaker on the subject of leadership. She said there was no difference between the way men and women coach the game, and that the important factor was diversity.

“I think everyone would say that we should have the best person available in every position, and who is the best person available? I believe in differences and that means that some countries and clubs will have men and some will have women,” she said.

Sundhage pointed to the difficulties women have in being considered for roles in football as a barrier that needs to be removed.

“If you’ve been on the men’s side as a coach and you haven’t seen a women’s game, you can be offered a job at a club team here in Sweden, for instance – the same thing doesn’t happen the other way round,” she said.

“If you are an experienced female player and leader and you haven’t worked in women’s football, you still have to demonstrate that you can do this (job).

“I don’t think we have any women who have had responsibility for a men’s elite team, to my knowledge,” she said.

(Reporting by Philip O’Connor; Editing by Ken Ferris)

Source: OANN


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