islands

FILE PHOTO: Australian Prime Minister Morrison speaks to the media as he arrives at the Horizon Church in Sutherland
FILE PHOTO:Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks to the media as he arrives at the Horizon Church in Sutherland in Sydney, Australia, May 19, 2019. AAP Image/Joel Carrett/via REUTERS

May 27, 2019

By Colin Packham

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison will visit the Solomon Islands next week, two sources familiar with the plans said on Monday, as Western nations seek to rein in China’s influence on the tiny Pacific island.

With the United States and its allies keen to ensure China does not increase its foothold in the Pacific, protecting diplomatic recognition for self-ruled Taiwan has emerged as a flashpoint in regional ties.

“China is the Solomon Islands’ largest trading partner and this is adding a lot of pressure on lawmakers to switch allegiances,” said Jonathan Pryke, Pacific Islands program director at the think-tank, the Lowy Institute.

The Solomon Islands is one of a handful of Pacific countries to recognize Taiwan, a policy now in question after recent elections. China views as Taiwan as a renegade province with no right to state-to-state ties.

On Friday, a senior U.S. official said Washington would help Pacific countries in the face of China’s attempts to influence them.

Those remarks threaten to inflame tension between the U.S. and China already heated by their trade war, U.S. sanctions and China’s increasingly muscular military posture in the South China Sea.

Morrison’s first overseas trip since winning re-election this month will also be the first time an Australian prime minister has visited the Solomon Islands since 2008.

SOFT POWER

Australia and China have been vying for influence in sparsely populated Pacific island countries that control vast swathes of resource-rich oceans.

Keen to undercut China’s Belt and Road Initiative, Australia has directed ever larger amounts of its foreign aid to the region.

In 2018, Australia said it would spend $139 million to develop undersea internet cable links to Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands, amid national security concerns about China’s Huawei Technologies Co Ltd.

That year, Australia became the first country to ban the world’s largest maker of telecom network gear from its nascent broadband network, a step the United States followed this year by effectively banning U.S. firms from doing business with Huawei.

In November, Australia offered Pacific countries up to A$3 billion in grants and cheap loans in build infrastructure, as Morrison declared the region was “our patch”.

Australia has won favor through its spending commitments but its support of its dominant coal industry is a sore point for many in the region.

“There is little doubt that many Pacific islands will have been unhappy with the re-election of Morrison,” said Peter Chen, a political science professor at the University of Sydney. “He will need to find common ground to repair that relationship.”

($1=1.4438 Australian dollars)

(Reporting by Colin Packham; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: Australian Prime Minister Morrison speaks to the media as he arrives at the Horizon Church in Sutherland
FILE PHOTO:Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks to the media as he arrives at the Horizon Church in Sutherland in Sydney, Australia, May 19, 2019. AAP Image/Joel Carrett/via REUTERS

May 27, 2019

By Colin Packham

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison will visit the Solomon Islands next week, two sources familiar with the plans said on Monday, as Western nations seek to rein in China’s influence on the tiny Pacific island.

With the United States and its allies keen to ensure China does not increase its foothold in the Pacific, protecting diplomatic recognition for self-ruled Taiwan has emerged as a flashpoint in regional ties.

“China is the Solomon Islands’ largest trading partner and this is adding a lot of pressure on lawmakers to switch allegiances,” said Jonathan Pryke, Pacific Islands program director at the think-tank, the Lowy Institute.

The Solomon Islands is one of a handful of Pacific countries to recognize Taiwan, a policy now in question after recent elections. China views as Taiwan as a renegade province with no right to state-to-state ties.

On Friday, a senior U.S. official said Washington would help Pacific countries in the face of China’s attempts to influence them.

Those remarks threaten to inflame tension between the U.S. and China already heated by their trade war, U.S. sanctions and China’s increasingly muscular military posture in the South China Sea.

Morrison’s first overseas trip since winning re-election this month will also be the first time an Australian prime minister has visited the Solomon Islands since 2008.

SOFT POWER

Australia and China have been vying for influence in sparsely populated Pacific island countries that control vast swathes of resource-rich oceans.

Keen to undercut China’s Belt and Road Initiative, Australia has directed ever larger amounts of its foreign aid to the region.

In 2018, Australia said it would spend $139 million to develop undersea internet cable links to Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands, amid national security concerns about China’s Huawei Technologies Co Ltd.

That year, Australia became the first country to ban the world’s largest maker of telecom network gear from its nascent broadband network, a step the United States followed this year by effectively banning U.S. firms from doing business with Huawei.

In November, Australia offered Pacific countries up to A$3 billion in grants and cheap loans in build infrastructure, as Morrison declared the region was “our patch”.

Australia has won favor through its spending commitments but its support of its dominant coal industry is a sore point for many in the region.

“There is little doubt that many Pacific islands will have been unhappy with the re-election of Morrison,” said Peter Chen, a political science professor at the University of Sydney. “He will need to find common ground to repair that relationship.”

($1=1.4438 Australian dollars)

(Reporting by Colin Packham; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: Australian Prime Minister Morrison speaks to the media as he arrives at the Horizon Church in Sutherland
FILE PHOTO:Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks to the media as he arrives at the Horizon Church in Sutherland in Sydney, Australia, May 19, 2019. AAP Image/Joel Carrett/via REUTERS

May 27, 2019

By Colin Packham

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison will visit the Solomon Islands next week, two sources familiar with the plans said on Monday, as Western nations seek to rein in China’s influence on the tiny Pacific island.

With the United States and its allies keen to ensure China does not increase its foothold in the Pacific, protecting diplomatic recognition for self-ruled Taiwan has emerged as a flashpoint in regional ties.

“China is the Solomon Islands’ largest trading partner and this is adding a lot of pressure on lawmakers to switch allegiances,” said Jonathan Pryke, Pacific Islands program director at the think-tank, the Lowy Institute.

The Solomon Islands is one of a handful of Pacific countries to recognize Taiwan, a policy now in question after recent elections. China views as Taiwan as a renegade province with no right to state-to-state ties.

On Friday, a senior U.S. official said Washington would help Pacific countries in the face of China’s attempts to influence them.

Those remarks threaten to inflame tension between the U.S. and China already heated by their trade war, U.S. sanctions and China’s increasingly muscular military posture in the South China Sea.

Morrison’s first overseas trip since winning re-election this month will also be the first time an Australian prime minister has visited the Solomon Islands since 2008.

SOFT POWER

Australia and China have been vying for influence in sparsely populated Pacific island countries that control vast swathes of resource-rich oceans.

Keen to undercut China’s Belt and Road Initiative, Australia has directed ever larger amounts of its foreign aid to the region.

In 2018, Australia said it would spend $139 million to develop undersea internet cable links to Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands, amid national security concerns about China’s Huawei Technologies Co Ltd.

That year, Australia became the first country to ban the world’s largest maker of telecom network gear from its nascent broadband network, a step the United States followed this year by effectively banning U.S. firms from doing business with Huawei.

In November, Australia offered Pacific countries up to A$3 billion in grants and cheap loans in build infrastructure, as Morrison declared the region was “our patch”.

Australia has won favor through its spending commitments but its support of its dominant coal industry is a sore point for many in the region.

“There is little doubt that many Pacific islands will have been unhappy with the re-election of Morrison,” said Peter Chen, a political science professor at the University of Sydney. “He will need to find common ground to repair that relationship.”

($1=1.4438 Australian dollars)

(Reporting by Colin Packham; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

Source: OANN

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U.S. fighter jets intercepted six Russian military planes in international airspace off the coast of Alaska on Monday, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) said Tuesday.

“Our ability to deter and defeat threats to our citizens and vital infrastructure starts with detecting, tracking, and positively identifying aircraft our airspace. We are on alert 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year,” NORAD wrote in a tweet Tuesday attributed to its commander, Gen. Terrence O’Shaughnessy.

On Monday, two Russian Tu-95 bombers entering the Alaskan Air Defense Identification Zone were intercepted by two U.S. F-22 fighter jets, NORAD said.

A second group of two Russian Tu-95s and two Su-35 fighter jets were later intercepted by two more F-22s, NORAD said.

A U.S. E-3 spy plane provided overall surveillance, NORAD added.

Interceptions of Russian military planes in the Alaskan Air Defense Identification Zone are somewhat common. U.S. F-22s twice intercepted Russian bombers in September, following a similar interception in May 2018.

In its own statement Tuesday, the Russian Defense Ministry said its bombers were making “scheduled sorties” over neutral waters above the Chukchi, Bering and Okhotsk seas, as well as off the western coast of Alaska and the northern coast of the Aleutian Islands.

Read More: https://thehill.com/policy/defense/444746-us-fighter-jets-intercept-russian-bombers-off-alaskan-coast

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Preble (DDG 88) transits in the the Indian Ocean
FILE PHOTO: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Preble (DDG 88) transits in the the Indian Ocean, March 29, 2018. Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Morgan K. Nall/U.S. Navy/Handout via REUTERS

May 20, 2019

By Idrees Ali

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. military said one of its warships sailed near the disputed Scarborough Shoal claimed by China in the South China Sea on Sunday, a move likely to anger Beijing at a time of tense ties between the world’s two biggest economies.

The busy waterway is one of a growing number of flashpoints in the U.S.-China relationship, which also include a trade war, U.S. sanctions and Taiwan.

China struck a more aggressive tone in its trade war with the United States on Friday. The tough talk capped a week that saw Beijing unveil fresh retaliatory tariffs.

The U.S. destroyer Preble carried out the operation, a U.S. military spokesman told Reuters.

“Preble sailed within 12 nautical miles of Scarborough Reef in order to challenge excessive maritime claims and preserve access to the waterways as governed by international law,” said Commander Clay Doss, a spokesman for the Seventh Fleet.

It was the second such U.S. military operation in the South China Sea in the last month. On Wednesday, the chief of the U.S. Navy said its freedom of navigation movements in the disputed South China Sea drew more attention than they deserved.

The U.S. military has a long-standing position that its operations are carried out throughout the world, including areas claimed by allies, and they are separate from political considerations.

The operation was the latest attempt to counter what Washington sees as Beijing’s efforts to limit freedom of navigation in the strategic waters, where Chinese, Japanese and some Southeast Asian navies operate.

China claims almost all of the strategic South China Sea and frequently lambasts the United States and its allies over naval operations near Chinese-occupied islands.

Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam have competing claims in the region.

China and the United States have repeatedly traded barbs in the past over what Washington says is Beijing’s militarization of the South China Sea by building military installations on artificial islands and reefs.

China defends its construction as necessary for self-defense and says the United States is responsible for ratcheting up tension in the region by sending warships and military planes close to islands Beijing claims.

Last month, China’s navy chief said freedom of navigation should not be used to infringe upon the rights of other nations.

(Reporting by Idrees Ali; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

Source: OANN

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Preble (DDG 88) transits in the the Indian Ocean
FILE PHOTO: The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Preble (DDG 88) transits in the the Indian Ocean, March 29, 2018. Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Morgan K. Nall/U.S. Navy/Handout via REUTERS

May 20, 2019

By Idrees Ali

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. military said one of its warships sailed near the disputed Scarborough Shoal claimed by China in the South China Sea on Sunday, a move likely to anger Beijing at a time of tense ties between the world’s two biggest economies.

The busy waterway is one of a growing number of flashpoints in the U.S.-China relationship, which also include a trade war, U.S. sanctions and Taiwan.

China struck a more aggressive tone in its trade war with the United States on Friday. The tough talk capped a week that saw Beijing unveil fresh retaliatory tariffs.

The U.S. destroyer Preble carried out the operation, a U.S. military spokesman told Reuters.

“Preble sailed within 12 nautical miles of Scarborough Reef in order to challenge excessive maritime claims and preserve access to the waterways as governed by international law,” said Commander Clay Doss, a spokesman for the Seventh Fleet.

It was the second such U.S. military operation in the South China Sea in the last month. On Wednesday, the chief of the U.S. Navy said its freedom of navigation movements in the disputed South China Sea drew more attention than they deserved.

The U.S. military has a long-standing position that its operations are carried out throughout the world, including areas claimed by allies, and they are separate from political considerations.

The operation was the latest attempt to counter what Washington sees as Beijing’s efforts to limit freedom of navigation in the strategic waters, where Chinese, Japanese and some Southeast Asian navies operate.

China claims almost all of the strategic South China Sea and frequently lambasts the United States and its allies over naval operations near Chinese-occupied islands.

Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam have competing claims in the region.

China and the United States have repeatedly traded barbs in the past over what Washington says is Beijing’s militarization of the South China Sea by building military installations on artificial islands and reefs.

China defends its construction as necessary for self-defense and says the United States is responsible for ratcheting up tension in the region by sending warships and military planes close to islands Beijing claims.

Last month, China’s navy chief said freedom of navigation should not be used to infringe upon the rights of other nations.

(Reporting by Idrees Ali; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: Activists stage a protest on a mock tropical island beach representing a tax haven outside a meeting of European Union finance ministers in Brussels
FILE PHOTO: Activists stage a protest on a mock tropical island beach representing a tax haven outside a meeting of European Union finance ministers in Brussels, Belgium, December 5, 2017. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir/File Photo

May 17, 2019

By Francesco Guarascio

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – The European Union removed the British overseas territory of Bermuda, the Dutch Caribbean island of Aruba and Barbados on Friday from the bloc’s blacklist of tax havens, leaving no EU territory still on the list.

The move left 12 jurisdictions on the list, prompting criticism over the EU blacklisting process, which was launched in 2017 after revelations of widespread tax avoidance schemes used by corporations and wealthy individuals to lower their tax bills.

The three islands were added to the list in March as they had failed for months to change their tax rules, which the EU deemed at risk of facilitating tax evasion in other countries.

But now Aruba has been removed because it has changed its legislation to make it compliant with EU requirements, an EU statement said.

Bermuda and Barbados have committed to addressing EU concerns and have therefore been moved to a so-called grey list of countries still under EU scrutiny for their tax practices, the statement said, effectively giving them more time to be fully compliant.

Bermuda’s Finance Minister Curtis Dickinson welcomed the EU decision. He said there was still work to be done to improve the island’s tax legislation on collective investment funds, about which the EU had still concerns.

“EU governments have once again let some of the world’s worst tax havens off the hook,” said Chiara Putaturo, of the anti-poverty group Oxfam.

“The reforms agreed by Bermuda, Barbados and Aruba will not stop them operating as tax havens,” she added, calling on the EU to blacklist all jurisdictions that offer very low or zero corporate tax rates.

The EU does not automatically add to its list tax-free countries unless they have additional provisions that could facilitate tax evasion, such as rules on offshore structures aimed at attracting foreign profits.

Major jurisdictions that are still on the EU list are the United Arab Emirates, Oman and the three U.S. territories of American Samoa, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Belize, Fiji, the Marshall Islands, Vanuatu, Dominica, Samoa and Trinidad and Tobago also remain on the blacklist.

Blacklisted states face reputational damage and stricter controls on transactions with the EU.

The list initially comprised 17 jurisdictions, but it is subject to regular reviews. Countries with legal shortfalls are added if they do not amend their rules by set deadlines.

(Reporting by Francesco Guarascio @fraguarascio; additional reporting by Emma Farge,; Editing by Elaine Hardcastle, William Maclean)

Source: OANN

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President Trump’s abrupt decision to increase tariffs to 25 percent on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods has upended the on-going trade talks between Washington and Beijing. While the Chinese both scrambled to send high-level negotiators to try and salvage negotiations and also levied reciprocal tariffs on $60 billion worth of U.S. goods, it was Beijing’s reported decision to renege on most of its trade concessions that prompted Trump’s turn-around. Far from rushing into a bad deal, the president is suffering from “promise fatigue” in dealing with the Chinese. This is an experience he shares with much of the American political establishment. Exasperation and incredulity are the new emotions shaping U.S. policy towards China.

“Promise fatigue” is a term used recently by Alaska Republican Sen. Dan Sullivan, but is a condition widely shared by many in Washington and beyond. No longer do U.S. policymakers believe Beijing’s protestations of good faith, of asserting that it will stop taking advantage of the U.S. in trade, that it will honor intellectual property rights, and that it will uphold freedom of navigation in critical waterways. Years of broken promises and a doubling down on exploitative behavior has worn thin Beijing’s welcome in Washington. 

Instead of frothy talk about a strategic partnership, the Trump administration has labeled the relationship with China one of strategic rivalry. Although Trump continues to tout his close personal relationship with President Xi Jinping, his administration has upended four decades of Sino-U.S. relations. In addition to slapping tariffs on hundreds of billions of dollars of Chinese goods, Trump has moved to block Huawei from America’s 5G network, arrested Chinese intelligence agents, and increased U.S. Navy activity in waters claimed by China. 

Trump isn’t the only one suffering from Chinese “promise fatigue.” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer is cheering on the administration’s hard-line trade stance, and several congressional committees have issued reports on the dangers of China’s technology theft and the role Beijing-funded Confucius Institutes have played in curtailing critical opinions of China on American college campuses. Last December, Congress passed the Asia Reassurance Initiative Act, appropriating $1.5 billion a year for enhanced U.S. activity throughout the Indo-Pacific region. American scholars long committed to engagement with China have also come to the conclusion that U.S. policy needs a course correction. 

Beijing has only itself to blame for America’s frustration . China’s leaders are learning that credibility is difficult to rebuild once squandered. After all, Xi promised President Obama that China would not militarize the islands it built in that strategically vital South China Sea, and then promptly did so. China’s president also committed himself to ending cybertheft against American companies and individuals, but such digital aggression continues unabated, as does its theft of intellectual property. Beijing has repeatedly said that it will curtail exports of fentanyl to the United States, which have   made America’s opioid epidemic exponentially more lethal, yet little has been done.

Not everyone is fed up with China, however. Despite widespread concerns about the transfer of high-end research results by some of the thousands of Chinese studying in the United States, American universities continue to enroll hundreds of thousands of these students every year. Silicon Valley similarly seems to see China as a partner or potential market, regardless of years of underperformance and regulatory and legal hurdles thrown up by the government. Hollywood continues to avoid almost any negative images of China, and perhaps most importantly, Wall Street has long been China’s most powerful champion in the corridors of power.

Yet all these actors increasingly are finding themselves on the wrong side of the zeitgeist. Leading the shift in attitude toward China is the man in the Oval Office. After a brief honeymoon with China, the president moved to implement his campaign promises to get tough. Although Hillary Clinton also assured voters that she would treat Beijing more assertively, it is Donald Trump who has fused together Democrats’ concerns about unfair trade with Republicans’ worries of China’s security threat, crafting a new policy with unlikely bedfellows. Moreover, Trump has stuck with his hard line despite Wall Street wobbles and predictions that his approach could cause outright conflict between Beijing and Washington. 

It is China’s long-term behavior, though, that has given Mr. Trump the running room to push back. Years of promises have proven hollow, and its newfound national strength is now seen by Americans and others around the world as threatening. Even as countries like Greece and Italy sign on to Xi’s One Belt One Road plan, others, like Poland and Canada, have rallied against Huawei and China’s bullying behavior. 

In the end, Beijing believed it could forever make promises and not deliver. The fatigue engendered by China’s bad faith will not soon dissipate. Instead, America and a good slice of the world are undertaking a fundamental reevaluation of their relations with China. If they now demand that Beijing uphold global norms and cease taking advantage of other nations, start protecting instead of undermining international law, and promote regional stability, then they will present China with a stark choice. Beijing’s answer will determine the course of global politics over the next generation.

Michael Auslin is a fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and the author of “The End of the Asian Century.”

U.S. Navy handout photo of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS McCampbell during a division tactics exercise in the South China Sea
The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS McCampbell during a divisional tactics exercise in the South China Sea, January 15, 2019. Photo taken January 15, 2019. Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class John Harris/U.S. Navy/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS – THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY

May 15, 2019

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – The head of operations of the United States Navy said on Wednesday that its freedom of navigation operations in the disputed South China Sea get more attention than they deserve.

The U.S. military said two of its warships sailed near islands claimed by China in the South China Sea on Monday last week, a move that angered Beijing at a time of tense ties between the world’s two biggest economies.

“(The operations) get more attention in the media and also have, sometimes from China, than they warrant, to be honest,” John Richardson told a reporters on the sidelines of a maritime defense conference in Singapore.

In an earlier speech, Richardson said that U.S. naval operations had been consistent over decades and had not risen recently.

(Reporting by Fathin Ungku and John Geddie; Editing by Nick Macfie)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: A view of the Goldman Sachs stall on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange
FILE PHOTO: A view of the Goldman Sachs stall on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange July 16, 2013. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid/File Photo

May 14, 2019

By Davide Barbuscia and Saeed Azhar

DUBAI (Reuters) – Goldman Sachs has bought a claim against The International Bank Corporation (TIBC), a Bahraini bank whose default 10 years ago triggered the biggest financial crisis in Saudi Arabia, three sources familiar with the matter said.

The U.S. investment bank bought $100 million of TIBC debt from Germany’s Commerzbank at the end of last year, two of the sources said, reflecting Goldman’s increased interest in Saudi Arabia.

Although it snubbed a Saudi investment conference last year following the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Goldman Sachs has since won a slew of mandates in the kingdom, including a lead role in Saudi Aramco’s debut international bond.

TIBC raised money in international markets, transferring the funds to now defaulted Saudi conglomerate Ahmad Hamad Algosaibi and Brothers (AHAB), in what a Cayman Islands court last year called one of the largest Ponzi schemes in history.

After TIBC defaulted on a foreign exchange deal with Deutsche Bank in 2009, AHAB – which denies knowledge of the scheme – collapsed, along with another Saudi conglomerate Saad, leaving an estimated $22 billion in unpaid debts.

TIBC, administered by Bahrain’s Central Bank, has a claim of around $3 billion against AHAB, a TIBC spokesman said, while more than 60 banks that have lent money to TIBC remain unpaid.

The sources said Goldman bought TIBC’s debt after rulings in various jurisdictions appeared to strengthen the position of the Bahraini bank against AHAB.

However, if AHAB’s application for a financial restructuring under the kingdom’s bankruptcy law is successful next week, Goldman’s claim may turn out to be worth less than it anticipated.

Goldman Sachs and Commerzbank declined to comment on the transaction.

LIQUIDATION

Last week, a Saudi court created in 2016 to look into AHAB’s affairs, the Joint Directorate of Enforcement at the General Court in Al Khobar (JDEK), suspended TIBC’s claims against AHAB until the bankruptcy petition was resolved, AHAB’s Chief Restructuring Officer, Simon Charlton, said.

TIBC obtained an enforcement order of around $1.6 billion against AHAB from JDEK last year.

The TIBC spokesman acknowledged the suspension but said he believed the enforcement order was still valid.

Meanwhile, Austria’s Raiffeisen Bank and HSBC – two of AHAB’s creditors – last month launched an application for the liquidation of AHAB under the kingdom’s bankruptcy law, said the sources.

AHAB has opposed the petition as it would like to reach a settlement with creditors under the financial restructuring process, Charlton said.

Raffeisen Bank declined to comment while HSBC did not respond to a request for comment.

The Dammam commercial court is expected to rule on the liquidation request next week.

(Editing by Kirsten Donovan)

Source: OANN


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