Italy

FILE PHOTO: A man looks at an electronic board showing the Nikkei stock index outside a brokerage in Tokyo
FILE PHOTO: A man looks at an electronic board showing the Nikkei stock index outside a brokerage in Tokyo, Japan, January 7, 2019. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

May 27, 2019

By Shinichi Saoshiro

TOKYO (Reuters) – Asia stocks edged up early on Monday, and the euro was confined to a narrow range after the weekend’s European Parliament elections highlighted the deepening political fragmentation of the 28-country bloc.

The euro was a shade higher at $1.1211, holding within a tight $1.2272-$1.2754 range in what was a limited reaction to so far the exit polls.

Estimates after the European Parliament polls closed on Sunday showed that the two largest centrist groups – the European Peoples’ Party (EPP) to the right and the Socialists & Democrats (S&D) on the left – will no longer hold a majority in the new 751-seat chamber.

Analysts said the single currency’s muted reaction to the preliminary vote outcome came as the results showed populist and far-right parties in some countries were unlikely to have gathered as much support as anticipated. .

A centrist, pro-EU coalition would still be possible in the new chamber that will sit for the first time on July 2nd. But it would be more difficult to piece together among more numerous partners, according to the European Parliament’s estimates.

The longer-term impact of the election, therefore, remained unclear, analysts say.

“It’s difficult to foresee what will happen to Brexit, the political situation in Italy and elections in Greece just by looking at the vote count,” said Shin Kadota, senior strategist at Barclays in Tokyo.

“We may not see an immediate market reaction, as the election outcome will have to seep in first before beginning to have a political impact on the various countries.”

The pound was 0.1% higher at $1.2727. Sterling had bounced back from a near five-month trough of $1.2605 after British Prime Minister Theresa May said she would quit early next month. [GBP/]

The dollar index against a basket of six major currencies inched down 0.05% to 97.563.

In equities, MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan added 0.1%.

Gains were limited by persistent concerns that the China-U.S. trade conflict was fast turning into a technology cold war between the world’s two largest economies.

Japan’s Nikkei climbed 0.2%.

Wall Street’s major indexes edged higher on Friday in a rebound from the previous session’s losses after comments from U.S. President Donald Trump regarding trade relations with China gave the wary markets a bit of a respite. [.N]

U.S. crude futures crawled up 0.38% to $58.85 per barrel, trimming some of the deep losses suffered last week when trade tensions clouded the global demand outlook for the commodity.

Brent crude rose 0.79% to %69.24 per barrel.

(Editing by Shri Navaratnam)

Source: OANN

French Open - Roland Garros
Tennis – French Open – Roland Garros, Paris, France – May 26, 2019 Switzerland’s Roger Federer in action during his first round match against Italy’s Lorenzo Sonego REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

May 26, 2019

By Julien Pretot

PARIS (Reuters) – Roger Federer made a stylish comeback to the French Open after a three-year hiatus as the revamped, widely-acclaimed Roland Garros burst into life on Sunday.

The 20-time Grand Slam champion, back on the Paris clay 10 years after his only title here, swept aside Italian Lorenzo Sonego 6-2 6-4 6-4 in a graceful performance on an expanded court Philippe Chatrier.

“The reception I got today was crazy, it was really nice to see a full stadium for a first round like this. It was a beauty,” the 37-year-old Swiss told reporters.

Earlier, 2016 champion Garbine Muguruza inaugurated the new court Simonne Mathieu with a first-round victory, describing the semi-sunken 5,000-seater as a ‘cosy’ place.

Situated within a botanical garden at the East end of Roland Garros, the court is cocooned by greenhouses featuring rare tropical plants.

“It’s a cute court. It’s in a very different place. You don’t feel like you are around a court. It’s like in a garden,” Muguruza said.

Some top players, however, will not get much chance to enjoy the new stadium, with former world number ones Angelique Kerber and Venus Williams sent packing along with former winner Svetlana Kuznetsova.

Opening proceedings on Chatrier, Germany’s Kerber was downed in two short sets by Russia’s Anastasia Potapova as her attempt at completing a career slam was cut short on her least favorite surface.

Seven-time Grand Slam champion Williams was also eliminated in straight sets by Ukraine’s Elina Svitolina, the ninth seed and one of a dozen contenders for the Suzanne Lenglen Cup.

Last year’s semi-finalist Marco Cecchinato of Italy, seeded 16th, was at the receiving end of Nicolas Mahut’s spectacular comeback as the local favorite advanced into the second round with a 2-6 6-7(8-6) 6-4 6-2 6-4 victory on court Simonne Mathieu.

In the women’s draw, second seed Karolina Pliskova and seventh seed Sloane Stephens eased into round two while on the men’s side, Greek sensation Stefanos Tsitsipas and Japan’s Kei Nishikori also progressed.

Top favorites Rafa Nadal, the 11-time champion, and world number one Novak Djokovic will be in first-round action on Monday.

(Reporting by Julien Pretot; editing by Tony Lawrence)

Source: OANN

ATP 1000 - Italian Open
Tennis – ATP 1000 – Italian Open – Foro Italico, Rome, Italy – May 19, 2019 Serbia’s Novak Djokovic celebrates during the final against Spain’s Rafael Nadal REUTERS/Matteo Ciambelli

May 26, 2019

By Martyn Herman

(Reuters) – Novak Djokovic stands on the verge of holding all four Grand Slam titles for the second time in his career and should he do it by winning the French Open, it would surpass anything Rafael Nadal or Roger Federer have achieved, said Mats Wilander.

Three years ago Djokovic became the first man since Australian great Rod Laver in 1969 to hold all four Grand Slams simultaneously when he beat Andy Murray to win the French Open.

A career slump followed but the Serb rebounded last year to win Wimbledon and the U.S. Open and this year took his Grand Slam total to 15 after holding aloft the Australian Open trophy for a seventh time.

Now he has the chance to win four in a row again and seven-time Grand Slam champion Wilander believes victory in Paris would pave the way to surpass both Federer (20) and Nadal (17) in Grand Slam titles.

“In the grand scheme of things Novak winning four in a row again, it would be the most impressive thing we have ever seen,” Eurosport analyst Wilander told Reuters in an interview.

The greatest of all time (GOAT) debate usually splits fans into the Federer and Nadal camps and Djokovic earns less adulation than those two.

“If Novak wins the French, suddenly then he has to be compared to the greatest players of all time,” Wilander said.

“He will have 16 (slams) if he wins the French. Okay Roger will still have 20 but it would be comparable because he would have won the Nole Slam twice, I mean that’s unbelievable.

“To me that’s incredible, Novak winning here is a bigger deal than Rafa winning 12 (French Opens). But then if Rafa wins, he’s on 18 majors so it’s getting crowded at the top.”

Wilander said the French Open was ‘monumental’ in terms of the longevity of Nadal’s career, saying a failure to retain his crown could have knock-on effects for the Spaniard.

“I think the bigger picture for me is more long term,” Wilander, part of Eurosport’s daily ‘Game Schett and Mats’ review of the action in Paris, said.

“If Rafa doesn’t win the French, I kind of see him having a hard time winning Wimbledon or the U.S. Open… then next year’s French Open comes into doubt.

“If Novak wins I mean the door will be wide open to reach 20 Grand Slams. Then if he equals Roger’s 20 he would be regarded as the greatest player of all time.”

That said, Wilander says this year’s men’s tournament is more open than usual with a host of young players such as Greek Stefanos Tsitsipas, Austrian Dominic Thiem, Russians Karen Khachanov and Daniil Medvedev and Chilean Cristian Garin equipped to cause trouble.

“So many guys hit the ball so hard today,” Wilander said. I’m not saying they will necessarily beat them but the worry for Novak or Rafa is how many matches will they be pushed to over the four hour mark in the first four rounds?

“Rafa, Roger or Novak against (Grigor) Dimitrov or (Kei) Nishikori, they have great records against them, but if Rafa played Tsitsipas he would be nervous from the first point.

“The young guys have less respect for reputations.”

(Reporting by Martyn Herman, editing by Pritha Sarkar)

Source: OANN

ATP 1000 - Italian Open
Tennis – ATP 1000 – Italian Open – Foro Italico, Rome, Italy – May 19, 2019 Serbia’s Novak Djokovic celebrates during the final against Spain’s Rafael Nadal REUTERS/Matteo Ciambelli

May 26, 2019

By Martyn Herman

(Reuters) – Novak Djokovic stands on the verge of holding all four Grand Slam titles for the second time in his career and should he do it by winning the French Open, it would surpass anything Rafael Nadal or Roger Federer have achieved, said Mats Wilander.

Three years ago Djokovic became the first man since Australian great Rod Laver in 1969 to hold all four Grand Slams simultaneously when he beat Andy Murray to win the French Open.

A career slump followed but the Serb rebounded last year to win Wimbledon and the U.S. Open and this year took his Grand Slam total to 15 after holding aloft the Australian Open trophy for a seventh time.

Now he has the chance to win four in a row again and seven-time Grand Slam champion Wilander believes victory in Paris would pave the way to surpass both Federer (20) and Nadal (17) in Grand Slam titles.

“In the grand scheme of things Novak winning four in a row again, it would be the most impressive thing we have ever seen,” Eurosport analyst Wilander told Reuters in an interview.

The greatest of all time (GOAT) debate usually splits fans into the Federer and Nadal camps and Djokovic earns less adulation than those two.

“If Novak wins the French, suddenly then he has to be compared to the greatest players of all time,” Wilander said.

“He will have 16 (slams) if he wins the French. Okay Roger will still have 20 but it would be comparable because he would have won the Nole Slam twice, I mean that’s unbelievable.

“To me that’s incredible, Novak winning here is a bigger deal than Rafa winning 12 (French Opens). But then if Rafa wins, he’s on 18 majors so it’s getting crowded at the top.”

Wilander said the French Open was ‘monumental’ in terms of the longevity of Nadal’s career, saying a failure to retain his crown could have knock-on effects for the Spaniard.

“I think the bigger picture for me is more long term,” Wilander, part of Eurosport’s daily ‘Game Schett and Mats’ review of the action in Paris, said.

“If Rafa doesn’t win the French, I kind of see him having a hard time winning Wimbledon or the U.S. Open… then next year’s French Open comes into doubt.

“If Novak wins I mean the door will be wide open to reach 20 Grand Slams. Then if he equals Roger’s 20 he would be regarded as the greatest player of all time.”

That said, Wilander says this year’s men’s tournament is more open than usual with a host of young players such as Greek Stefanos Tsitsipas, Austrian Dominic Thiem, Russians Karen Khachanov and Daniil Medvedev and Chilean Cristian Garin equipped to cause trouble.

“So many guys hit the ball so hard today,” Wilander said. I’m not saying they will necessarily beat them but the worry for Novak or Rafa is how many matches will they be pushed to over the four hour mark in the first four rounds?

“Rafa, Roger or Novak against (Grigor) Dimitrov or (Kei) Nishikori, they have great records against them, but if Rafa played Tsitsipas he would be nervous from the first point.

“The young guys have less respect for reputations.”

(Reporting by Martyn Herman, editing by Pritha Sarkar)

Source: OANN

The Best FIFA Football Awards
FILE PHOTO: Soccer Football – The Best FIFA Football Awards – Royal Festival Hall, London, Britain – September 24, 2018 Marta after winning the Best Women’s Player award Action Images via Reuters/John Sibley

May 26, 2019

SAO PAULO (Reuters) – Brazil striker Marta is a doubt for their women’s World Cup opener against Jamaica next month after the country’s soccer confederation (CBF) said on Saturday she had picked up a hamstring injury in training.

Marta, named Women’s Player of the Year a record six times, picked up the injury at Brazil’s camp in Portugal and while the CBF did not clarify how serious the injury was coach Vadao told a Globo website she could miss their June 9 opener.

“Our worry is just about the first game,” he said, “and whether she has time to recover or not.

“She feels fine. We’ll wait a couple of days for the medical department to give me a more concrete appraisal.”

The absence of Marta, who has scored a record 15 women’s World Cup goals, would make Brazil’s life even more difficult at the June 7 to July 7 tournament in France, where they also meet Australia and Italy in the group phase.

The finalists in 2007 come into the tournament having lost their last nine matches, their worst ever run.

(Reporting by Andrew Downie; Editing by Peter Rutherford)

Source: OANN

The Best FIFA Football Awards
FILE PHOTO: Soccer Football – The Best FIFA Football Awards – Royal Festival Hall, London, Britain – September 24, 2018 Marta after winning the Best Women’s Player award Action Images via Reuters/John Sibley

May 26, 2019

SAO PAULO (Reuters) – Brazil striker Marta is a doubt for their women’s World Cup opener against Jamaica next month after the country’s soccer confederation (CBF) said on Saturday she had picked up a hamstring injury in training.

Marta, named Women’s Player of the Year a record six times, picked up the injury at Brazil’s camp in Portugal and while the CBF did not clarify how serious the injury was coach Vadao told a Globo website she could miss their June 9 opener.

“Our worry is just about the first game,” he said, “and whether she has time to recover or not.

“She feels fine. We’ll wait a couple of days for the medical department to give me a more concrete appraisal.”

The absence of Marta, who has scored a record 15 women’s World Cup goals, would make Brazil’s life even more difficult at the June 7 to July 7 tournament in France, where they also meet Australia and Italy in the group phase.

The finalists in 2007 come into the tournament having lost their last nine matches, their worst ever run.

(Reporting by Andrew Downie; Editing by Peter Rutherford)

Source: OANN

A man casts his vote during European Parliament election in Riga
A man casts his vote during European Parliament election in Riga, Latvia, May 25, 2019. REUTERS/Ints Kalnins

May 25, 2019

By Alastair Macdonald

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Europeans vote on Sunday in an election expected to further dent traditional pro-EU parties and bolster the nationalist fringe in the European Parliament, putting a potential brake on collective action in economic and foreign policy.

Right-wing populists top opinion polls in two of the big four member states – Italy and supposedly exiting Britain – and could also win in a third, France, rattling a pro-Union campaign championed by centrist President Emmanuel Macron.

However, exit polls in some countries that have already voted have given pro-EU parties some comfort. The Dutch Labour party, all but written off, looks to have finished first, helped by the visibility of having the EU socialists’ lead candidate, current EU deputy chief executive Frans Timmermans.

In the Netherlands, pro-Union parties scored 70%, up three points on the last European Parliament vote in 2014, and left the upstart anti-immigration party of Thierry Baudet fourth on 11%.

The Dutch also turned out in bigger numbers, albeit at just 41%, reinforcing hopes in Brussels of reversing a 40-year trend of declining turnout that critics cite as a “democratic deficit” that undermines the legitimacy of European Union lawmaking.

An exit poll after Friday’s vote in deeply pro-EU Ireland pointed to an expected “Green Wave”. Across the bloc, concerns about climate change and the environment may bolster the pro-EU Greens group and could mean tighter regulations for industry and for the terms the EU may set for partners seeking trade accords.

Britain also voted on Thursday and a new party focused on getting out of the EU was forecast by pre-vote opinion polls to come top, but there has been no exit poll data. Attention there has focused on the resignation of Prime Minister Theresa May. Results will be out late on Sunday, when all countries have voted.

WAY AHEAD UNCLEAR

The challenges facing the European project include unprecedented transatlantic slights from a U.S. president who fetes Europe’s populists, border rows among its own members over migrants and an economy hobbled by public debt and challenged by the rise of China.

But parties seeking collective action on shared issues such as trade, security, migration or climate change should still dominate, albeit with a smaller overall majority.

Europeans are preparing to remember events that shaped the Union. It is 75 years since Americans landed in France to defeat Nazi Germany and since Russian forces let the Germans crush a Polish bid for freedom, and 30 since Germans smashed the Berlin Wall to reunite east and west Europe. But memories of wars, hot and cold, have not sufficed to build faith in a united future.

Mainstream parties pushing closer integration of the euro currency zone’s economy are struggling to capture the imagination of a public jaded by political elites.

Matteo Salvini’s League in Italy may pip the Christian Democrats of German Chancellor Angela Merkel, the bloc’s power broker, to become the biggest single party in the 751-seat chamber.

Right-wing ruling parties in Poland and Hungary, defying Brussels over curbs to judicial and media independence, will also return eurosceptic lawmakers on Sunday.

The results should be clear by late on Sunday, with exit polls in Germany at 1600 GMT and France at 1800 GMT setting the tone before the final end of voting, in Italy at 2100 GMT, sees the Parliament publish its own seat forecast.

The result will usher in weeks of bargaining among parties to form a stable majority in the Parliament, and among national leaders to choose successors to European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and other top EU officials.

Many expect a clash as early as Tuesday, when leaders meeting in Brussels are likely to snub Parliament’s demands that one of the newly elected lawmakers should run the EU executive.

(EU election graphic: https://tmsnrt.rs/2HvZs1M)

(Reporting by Alastair MacDonald; Editing by Frances Kerry)

Source: OANN

Cycling - Tour de France cycling race - Stage 17 from Berne to Finhaut-Emosson, Switzerland
FILE PHOTO: Cycling – Tour de France cycling race – The 184.5 km (114.6 miles) Stage 17 from Berne to Finhaut-Emosson, Switzerland – 20/07/2016 – Team Katusha rider Ilnur Zakarin of Russia wins on the finish line. REUTERS/Jean-Paul Pelissier

May 24, 2019

CERESOLE REALE, Italy (Reuters) – Russian Ilnur Zakarin powered to victory in the 13th stage of the Giro d’Italia, the first mountain test for the overall contenders, while favorites Primoz Roglic and Vincenzo Nibali finished together on Friday.

A member of the day’s breakaway, Katusha’s Zakarin went solo in the final climb to beat Spain’s Mikel Nieve by 35 seconds and another Spaniard, Mikel Landa, by 1:20 with Jan Polanc of Slovenia retaining the overall leader’s pink jersey.

Slovenian Roglic and Italian Nibali crossed the line 2:57 off the pace after allowing several riders to come back into the game.

“The last climb was really hard, I did not have a lot of strength left,” said Zakarin, who now has ambitions for the general classification.

“Now I can aim at a top five.”

It was another bad day for Simon Yates as the Briton finished five minutes behind Zakarin after he had already lost considerable ground in last Sunday’s individual time trial.

Mitchelton Scott’s Yates cracked after Landa attacked early in the last climb, a 20.3-climb up to Lake Serru, the Movistar rider benefiting from the help of several team mates.

Another top contender, Colombian Miguel Angel Lopez, dropped out in the last ascent after suffering mechanical problems and reached the finish 4:19 down on Zakarin.

Overall, Polanc leads Roglic by 2:25 with Zakarin third 2:56 off the pace.

Dutchman Bauke Mollema is fourth, 3:06 behind Polanc, with double champion Nibali 4:09 down on the leader.

Saturday’s 14th stage is a grueling 131-km mountain trek from Saint Vincent to Courmayeur featuring five categorized climbs.

(Reporting by Julien Pretot; Editing by Pritha Sarkar)

Source: OANN

ATP 1000 - Italian Open
FILE PHOTO: Tennis – ATP 1000 – Italian Open – Foro Italico, Rome, Italy – May 16, 2019 Switzerland’s Roger Federer celebrates after winning his third round match against Croatia’s Borna Coric REUTERS/Matteo Ciambelli

May 24, 2019

By Julien Pretot

PARIS (Reuters) – Having won 20 grand slam titles during a glittering career, one might think that Roger Federer has seen it all.

Yet the 37-year-old Swiss admits he is stepping into the unknown as he returns to the French Open after a three-year hiatus.

The former world number one won his only Roland Garros title back in 2009, and he wanted to give it another go after skipping the last three editions of the claycourt major.

Asked if he thought he could lift the Musketeers’ Cup on June 9, Federer replied: “I don’t know. A bit of a question mark for me. Some ways I feel similar to maybe the Australian Open in 2017. A bit of the unknown,” Federer told reporters on Friday referring to his comeback to the season’s first major in 2017 after being out of action for six months.

“I feel like I’m playing good tennis but … is it enough against the absolute top guys when it really comes to the crunch? I’m not sure if it’s in my racket.

“But I hope I can get myself in that position deep down in the tournament against the top guys. But first I need to get there and I know that’s a challenge in itself. Yeah, it’s definitely going to be an exciting tournament mentally to go through.”

Federer will kick off his campaign against Italian Lorenzo Sonego and has a relatively easy path until the quarter-finals, where he could meet Greek Stefanos Tsitsipas before a potential semi-final against 11-time champion Rafael Nadal, whom he has never beaten at the French Open.

Federer won the title in 2009 after Nadal had been beaten by Swede Robin Soderling midway through the event. Federer then defeated Soderling in the final to complete his career slam.

Looking back to that tournament 10 year ago, Federer said he was happy he managed to handle the pressure as expectations could have crushed him following Nadal’s exit.

“This is where these expectations started when the journalists started saying it’s this year or never,” he explained.

“From then on, the next nine or 10 days felt like

forever. (When) Soderling had beaten Rafa… I knew that instead of the tournament becoming easier, it was going to become more difficult because of the pressure,” added the Swiss, who was stretched to five sets in his fourth round and semi-final matches after news of Nadal’s demise had already hit the headlines.

“But it was nevertheless interesting and I felt better,

and I feel proud that I was able to manage the pressure.”

(Reporting by Julien Pretot; Editing by Pritha Sarkar)

Source: OANN

ATP 1000 - Italian Open
FILE PHOTO: Tennis – ATP 1000 – Italian Open – Foro Italico, Rome, Italy – May 16, 2019 Switzerland’s Roger Federer celebrates after winning his third round match against Croatia’s Borna Coric REUTERS/Matteo Ciambelli

May 24, 2019

By Julien Pretot

PARIS (Reuters) – Having won 20 grand slam titles during a glittering career, one might think that Roger Federer has seen it all.

Yet the 37-year-old Swiss admits he is stepping into the unknown as he returns to the French Open after a three-year hiatus.

The former world number one won his only Roland Garros title back in 2009, and he wanted to give it another go after skipping the last three editions of the claycourt major.

Asked if he thought he could lift the Musketeers’ Cup on June 9, Federer replied: “I don’t know. A bit of a question mark for me. Some ways I feel similar to maybe the Australian Open in 2017. A bit of the unknown,” Federer told reporters on Friday referring to his comeback to the season’s first major in 2017 after being out of action for six months.

“I feel like I’m playing good tennis but … is it enough against the absolute top guys when it really comes to the crunch? I’m not sure if it’s in my racket.

“But I hope I can get myself in that position deep down in the tournament against the top guys. But first I need to get there and I know that’s a challenge in itself. Yeah, it’s definitely going to be an exciting tournament mentally to go through.”

Federer will kick off his campaign against Italian Lorenzo Sonego and has a relatively easy path until the quarter-finals, where he could meet Greek Stefanos Tsitsipas before a potential semi-final against 11-time champion Rafael Nadal, whom he has never beaten at the French Open.

Federer won the title in 2009 after Nadal had been beaten by Swede Robin Soderling midway through the event. Federer then defeated Soderling in the final to complete his career slam.

Looking back to that tournament 10 year ago, Federer said he was happy he managed to handle the pressure as expectations could have crushed him following Nadal’s exit.

“This is where these expectations started when the journalists started saying it’s this year or never,” he explained.

“From then on, the next nine or 10 days felt like

forever. (When) Soderling had beaten Rafa… I knew that instead of the tournament becoming easier, it was going to become more difficult because of the pressure,” added the Swiss, who was stretched to five sets in his fourth round and semi-final matches after news of Nadal’s demise had already hit the headlines.

“But it was nevertheless interesting and I felt better,

and I feel proud that I was able to manage the pressure.”

(Reporting by Julien Pretot; Editing by Pritha Sarkar)

Source: OANN


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