LONDON

FILE PHOTO: U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton speaks during a graduation ceremony at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London
FILE PHOTO: U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton speaks during a graduation ceremony at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut, U.S., May 22, 2019. REUTERS/Michelle McLoughlin

May 27, 2019

SEOUL (Reuters) – U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton is a “war fanatic” who was wrong to conclude that North Korea’s recent missile tests violated United Nations resolutions, the North’s foreign ministry said in a statement carried by state media on Monday.

A statement issued by state news agency KCNA quoted a foreign ministry representative as saying that giving up missile tests would mean giving up the right to self defense.

The representative singled out Bolton, who last week said the recent tests “no doubt” violated U.N. resolutions.

Bolton is working more to destroy peace and security that maintain security, it added.

(Reporting by Josh Smith; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: U.S. dollar and Euro notes are seen in this picture illustration
FILE PHOTO: U.S. dollar and Euro notes are seen in this November 7, 2016 picture illustration. Picture taken November 7. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration

May 27, 2019

By Hideyuki Sano

TOKYO (Reuters) – The euro barely budged in early Monday trade after pro-European Union parties held on to two-thirds of seats in the EU parliament elections, limiting gains in nationalist opponents.

The common currency was little changed at $1.1210 in Asian trade and off a two-year low of $1.11055 touched on Thursday, as the markets studied the outcome of the vote.

While center-right and center-left blocs are losing their shared majority, surges in the Greens and liberals meant parties committed to strengthening the union held on to two-thirds of seats, official projections showed.

The results dented the hopes of anti-immigration, anti-Brussels National Rally led by Marine Le Pen, Italian Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini and others who have been opposing attempts to forge closer EU integration.

“The focus is on how each government will react and how the Brexit negotiations will play out after this elections. So far we’ve seen limited market reaction as far-right, populist parties didn’t do as well as some had feared,” said Shin Kadota, senior FX and rates strategist at Barclays.

Trading was seen subdued on Monday due to market holidays in London and New York.

The dollar was little changed against other currencies.

The U.S. currency traded at 109.35 yen, not far from a three-month low of 109.02 touched two weeks ago, hit amid worries about escalating tensions between Washington and Beijing over trade and technology.

The dollar has been also capped against the yen as U.S. President Donald Trump is seen putting pressure on Japan to take measures to reduce its trade surplus with the United States.

Trump, who arrived in Tokyo on Saturday, tweeted on Sunday that much of the trade negotiation with Japan will wait until after the country’s election in July.

The British pound was steady at $1.2725, having regained some ground after Prime Minister Theresa May set out a departure date, bouncing back from a 4-1/2-month low of $1.2605 set on Thursday.

But the prospect of a “no deal” Brexit was fast becoming the central battle of the race among contenders to succeed May, with four of eight leadership hopefuls having said Britain must leave the EU on Oct. 31 even if this means a no-deal Brexit.

(Editing by Shri Navaratnam)

Source: OANN

British Prime Minister Theresa May arrives to deliver a statement in London
British Prime Minister Theresa May arrives to deliver a statement in London, Britain, May 24, 2019. REUTERS/Simon Dawson

May 26, 2019

By Kylie MacLellan

LONDON (Reuters) – The prospect of a “no deal” Brexit was fast becoming the central battle of the race to succeed Prime Minister Theresa May on Sunday, as environment minister Michael Gove became the latest candidate to declare.

May said on Friday she was quitting over her failure to deliver Brexit, potentially opening the way for a new leader who could seek a more divisive split with the European Union and lead to confrontation with the bloc or a possible parliamentary election.

Setting out their pitch to the Conservative Party’s largely pro-Brexit membership who will decide the outcome of the contest, four of the leadership hopefuls have said Britain must leave the EU on Oct. 31 even if this means a no-deal Brexit.

“I will fight for a fairer deal in Brussels … if not I will be clear we will leave on WTO terms in October,” former Brexit minister Dominic Raab, who bookmakers rank as the second favorite to win, told BBC TV.

“If you’re not willing to walk away from a negotiation, it doesn’t focus the mind of the other side … I will not ask for an extension.”

Fellow contenders Esther McVey and Andrea Leadsom both made similar comments on Sunday, while former foreign minister Boris Johnson, the favorite to replace May, said on Friday: “We will leave the EU on October 31, deal or no deal.”

Gove, a leading campaigner for Brexit during the 2016 referendum campaign and a candidate in the Conservative leadership contest that May ultimately won, told reporters on Sunday that he planned to run again.

“I am ready to unite the Conservative and Unionist Party, ready to deliver Brexit and ready to lead this great country,” he said, without giving any detail on his plans for Brexit.

“A DANGEROUS STRATEGY”

The EU has said it will not reopen negotiations on the Withdrawal Agreement, which has been rejected by parliament three times, while British lawmakers have also repeatedly voted against the prospect of a no-deal exit.

Highlighting the deep splits within the governing party over the way forward on Brexit, several senior Conservatives, including leadership candidate Rory Stewart, on Sunday warned against pursuing the policy of leaving without a deal.

Finance minister Philip Hammond said parliament would be “vehemently opposed” to a no-deal strategy and a prime minister who ignored parliament “cannot expect to survive very long”.

“I will urge all of my colleagues who are standing in this contest to embrace the concept of compromise … going to parliament with a hard line absolutist view and daring parliament to accept it is quite a dangerous strategy,” he told BBC TV.

Hammond said he could not support a no-deal strategy but declined to say what he would do if there was a vote of confidence in a government which adopted that policy.

“In 22 years in parliament I have never voted against the Conservatives … and I don’t want to have to start now contemplating such a course of action,” he said.

The opposition Labour Party said it was seeking to work with other parties to try and block May’s successor from taking Britain out of the EU without a deal.

“There is real threat now of an extremist Brexiteer becoming the leader of the Conservative Party and taking us over the cliff edge of a no deal,” Labour’s finance spokesman John McDonnell told Sky News. “We have got to move to block a no deal.”

The deadlock over Brexit is expected to have hit both main parties when the results of the European Parliament elections are declared from 2100 GMT on Sunday, with Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party, which backs a no-deal exit, predicted to come out on top.

(Additional reporting by David Milliken. Editing by Jane Merriman)

Source: OANN

President Trump on Friday said that he wants Attorney General William Barr to investigate the UK, Australia and Ukraine for their roles in the ‘greatest hoax in the history of our country.’

Speaking with reporters at the White House on Friday before his trip to Japan, Trump discussed his decision this week to issue a sweeping declassification order – leaving it in the hands of Barr to determine exactly what happened to Trump and his campaign before and after the 2016 US election.

“For over a year, people have asked me to declassify. What I’ve done is declassified everything,” said Trump, adding “He can look and I hope he looks at the UK and I hope he looks at Australia and I hope he looks at Ukraine.”

“It’s the greatest hoax probably in the history of our country and somebody has to get to the bottom of it. We’ll see. For a long period of time, they wanted me to declassify and I did.”

(UK, Australia, Ukraine comment at 2:30)

“This is about finding out what happened,” said Trump. “What happened and when did it happen, because this was an attempted takedown of the president of the United States, and we have to find out why.”

“We’re exposing everything. We’re being a word that you like, transparent. We’re being, ultimately we’re being transparent. That’s what it’s about. Again, this should never ever happen in our country again.”

After the Mueller report made clear that Trump and his campaign had in no way conspired with Russia during hte 2016 election, Democrats immediately pivoted to whether Trump obstructed the investigation. Trump and his supporters, however, immediately pivoted to the conduct of the US intelligence community, including the involvement of foreign actors and possibly their governments.

According to a report last week, the discredited “Steele Dossier” – assembled by former MI6 spy Christopher Steele – was referred to as “crown material” in an email exchange suggesting that former FBI Director James Comey insisted that CIA Director John Brennan pushed for the inclusion of the dossier in the intelligence community assessment (ICA) on Russian interference.

Moreover, much of “Operation Crossfire Hurricane” – the FBI’s official investigation into the Trump campaign – occurred on UK soil, which is perhaps why the New York Times reported last September that the UK begged Trump not to declassify ‘Russiagate’ documents ‘without redaction.’

Shortly after he announced his involvement with the Trump campaign, aide George Papadopoulos was lured to London in March, 2016, where Maltese professor and self-described Clinton foundation member Joseph Mifsud fed him the rumor that Russia had damaging information on Hillary Clinton. It was later at a London bar that Papadopoulos would drunkenly pass the rumor to Australian diplomat Alexander Downer (who FBI agent Peter Strzok flew to London to meet with the day after Crossfire Hurricane was launched).

Joseph Mifsud, George Papadopoulos

Two weeks laterPapadopoulos would be bilked for information by Australian diplomat (another Clinton ally) Alexander Downer at a London bar, who relayed the Russia rumor to Australian authorities, which alerted the FBI (as the story goes), which ‘officially’ kicked off the US intelligence investigation.

As for Ukraine, a Ukrainian court ruled in December that the country meddled in the US election when they revealed details of suspected illegal payments to former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort.

In 2016, while Mr. Manafort was chairman of the Trump campaign, anti-corruption prosecutors in Ukraine disclosed that a pro-Russian political party had earmarked payments for Mr. Manafort from an illegal slush fund. Mr. Manafort resigned from the campaign a week later. –New York Times

Last week, President Trump’s attorney Rudy Giuliani met with a former Ukrainian diplomat, Andril Telizhenko, who has previously suggested that the DNC worked with the Kiev government in 2016 to dig up ‘dirt’ on then-candidate Donald Trump. Giuliani told the Washington Post in a Friday interview that Telizhenko “was in Washington and he came up to New York, and we spent most of the afternoon together,” adding “When I have something to say, I’ll say it.”

This comes on the heels of Giuliani canceling a trip to Ukraine to meet with President-elect Volodymyr Zelensky to discuss the Manafort situation.

According to The Hill‘s John Solomon,

A former DNC operative steeped in Trump-Russia research approached the Ukrainian government looking for ‘dirt’ on then-candidate Donald Trump during the 2016 US election, citing written answers to questions submitted to Ambassador Valeriy Chaly’s office.

Chaly confirmed that DNC insider of Ukrainian heritage, Alexandra Chalupa, approached Ukraine seeking information on Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort’s dealings inside the country, in the hopes of exposing them to Congress.

Chalupa, who told Politico in 2017 that she had “developed a network of sources in Kiev and Washington, including investigative journalists, government officials and private intelligence operatives,” said she “occasionally shared her findings with officials from the DNC and Clinton’s campaign.

In short, a DNC operative of Ukrainian heritage, who shared information with the Clinton campaign and worked with a convicted terrorist to spread misinformation to undermine the legitimacy of the 2016 election, approached the government of Ukraine in the hopes of obtaining “dirt” that would hurt the Trump campaign.

And Trump wants AG Barr to look at it all. He’ll be visiting the UK next month, meanwhile, where he can ask outgoing PM Theresa May, or the Queen, all about it.

Source: InfoWars

President Trump on Friday said that he wants Attorney General William Barr to investigate the UK, Australia and Ukraine for their roles in the ‘greatest hoax in the history of our country.’

Speaking with reporters at the White House on Friday before his trip to Japan, Trump discussed his decision this week to issue a sweeping declassification order – leaving it in the hands of Barr to determine exactly what happened to Trump and his campaign before and after the 2016 US election.

“For over a year, people have asked me to declassify. What I’ve done is declassified everything,” said Trump, adding “He can look and I hope he looks at the UK and I hope he looks at Australia and I hope he looks at Ukraine.”

“It’s the greatest hoax probably in the history of our country and somebody has to get to the bottom of it. We’ll see. For a long period of time, they wanted me to declassify and I did.”

(UK, Australia, Ukraine comment at 2:30)

“This is about finding out what happened,” said Trump. “What happened and when did it happen, because this was an attempted takedown of the president of the United States, and we have to find out why.”

“We’re exposing everything. We’re being a word that you like, transparent. We’re being, ultimately we’re being transparent. That’s what it’s about. Again, this should never ever happen in our country again.”

After the Mueller report made clear that Trump and his campaign had in no way conspired with Russia during hte 2016 election, Democrats immediately pivoted to whether Trump obstructed the investigation. Trump and his supporters, however, immediately pivoted to the conduct of the US intelligence community, including the involvement of foreign actors and possibly their governments.

According to a report last week, the discredited “Steele Dossier” – assembled by former MI6 spy Christopher Steele – was referred to as “crown material” in an email exchange suggesting that former FBI Director James Comey insisted that CIA Director John Brennan pushed for the inclusion of the dossier in the intelligence community assessment (ICA) on Russian interference.

Moreover, much of “Operation Crossfire Hurricane” – the FBI’s official investigation into the Trump campaign – occurred on UK soil, which is perhaps why the New York Times reported last September that the UK begged Trump not to declassify ‘Russiagate’ documents ‘without redaction.’

Shortly after he announced his involvement with the Trump campaign, aide George Papadopoulos was lured to London in March, 2016, where Maltese professor and self-described Clinton foundation member Joseph Mifsud fed him the rumor that Russia had damaging information on Hillary Clinton. It was later at a London bar that Papadopoulos would drunkenly pass the rumor to Australian diplomat Alexander Downer (who FBI agent Peter Strzok flew to London to meet with the day after Crossfire Hurricane was launched).

Joseph Mifsud, George Papadopoulos

Two weeks laterPapadopoulos would be bilked for information by Australian diplomat (another Clinton ally) Alexander Downer at a London bar, who relayed the Russia rumor to Australian authorities, which alerted the FBI (as the story goes), which ‘officially’ kicked off the US intelligence investigation.

As for Ukraine, a Ukrainian court ruled in December that the country meddled in the US election when they revealed details of suspected illegal payments to former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort.

In 2016, while Mr. Manafort was chairman of the Trump campaign, anti-corruption prosecutors in Ukraine disclosed that a pro-Russian political party had earmarked payments for Mr. Manafort from an illegal slush fund. Mr. Manafort resigned from the campaign a week later. –New York Times

Last week, President Trump’s attorney Rudy Giuliani met with a former Ukrainian diplomat, Andril Telizhenko, who has previously suggested that the DNC worked with the Kiev government in 2016 to dig up ‘dirt’ on then-candidate Donald Trump. Giuliani told the Washington Post in a Friday interview that Telizhenko “was in Washington and he came up to New York, and we spent most of the afternoon together,” adding “When I have something to say, I’ll say it.”

This comes on the heels of Giuliani canceling a trip to Ukraine to meet with President-elect Volodymyr Zelensky to discuss the Manafort situation.

According to The Hill‘s John Solomon,

A former DNC operative steeped in Trump-Russia research approached the Ukrainian government looking for ‘dirt’ on then-candidate Donald Trump during the 2016 US election, citing written answers to questions submitted to Ambassador Valeriy Chaly’s office.

Chaly confirmed that DNC insider of Ukrainian heritage, Alexandra Chalupa, approached Ukraine seeking information on Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort’s dealings inside the country, in the hopes of exposing them to Congress.

Chalupa, who told Politico in 2017 that she had “developed a network of sources in Kiev and Washington, including investigative journalists, government officials and private intelligence operatives,” said she “occasionally shared her findings with officials from the DNC and Clinton’s campaign.

In short, a DNC operative of Ukrainian heritage, who shared information with the Clinton campaign and worked with a convicted terrorist to spread misinformation to undermine the legitimacy of the 2016 election, approached the government of Ukraine in the hopes of obtaining “dirt” that would hurt the Trump campaign.

And Trump wants AG Barr to look at it all. He’ll be visiting the UK next month, meanwhile, where he can ask outgoing PM Theresa May, or the Queen, all about it.

Source: InfoWars

Philip Hammond MP, Chancellor of the Exchequer appears on BBC TV's The Andrew Marr Show in London
Philip Hammond MP, Chancellor of the Exchequer appears on BBC TV’s The Andrew Marr Show in London, Britain, May 26, 2019. Jeff Overs/BBC/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS – THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES. NOT FOR USE MORE THAN 21 DAYS AFTER ISSUE.

May 26, 2019

LONDON (Reuters) – British finance minister Philip Hammond said on Sunday it would be very difficult for Prime Minister Theresa May’s successor to bypass the will of parliament and seek to take Britain out of the European Union without a deal.

Several of the candidates vying to take over from May have said Britain must leave on Oct. 31, without or without a deal. Parliament has repeatedly voted against a no-deal Brexit and Hammond said he did not believe Britain was likely to be heading towards leaving without an agreement.

Hammond said parliament would be “vehemently opposed” to a strategy of leaving without a deal.

“It would be very difficult for a prime minister who adopted no deal as a policy … to retain the confidence of the House of Commons,” Hammond told BBC TV, adding that he could not personally support a no-deal strategy.

(Reporting by Kylie MacLellan and David Milliken; Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky)

Source: OANN

Dominic Raab attends
Dominic Raab, former Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union attends “A Better Deal” event in London, Britain, January 15, 2018. REUTERS/Eddie Keogh

May 26, 2019

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain must be ready to leave the European Union without an exit deal on Oct. 31, former Brexit minister Dominic Raab said on Sunday, as he set out his pitch to succeed Theresa May as prime minister.

“If you’re not willing to walk away from a negotiation, it doesn’t focus the mind of the other side,” Raab told the BBC. “If you do that you can be really credible in Brussels.”

Raab said he would prefer Britain left with a deal but that he did not want to delay the planned Oct. 31 departure date. He also said he believed Britain would only be legally obliged to pay about 14 billion pounds ($18 billion) of the current 39 billion pound exit bill if there was a no-deal Brexit.

(Reporting by Kylie MacLellan, writing by David Milliken)

Source: OANN

Britain's Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer John McDonnell arrives at Cabinet Office in London
FILE PHOTO: Britain’s Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer John McDonnell of the Labour Party, arrives for cross party Brexit talks at Cabinet Office in London, Britain May 7, 2019. REUTERS/Toby Melville

May 26, 2019

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s opposition Labour Party will seek to prevent Prime Minister Theresa May’s successor taking the country out of the European Union without a deal, its finance spokesman John McDonnell said on Sunday.

May said on Friday she would step down next month, and several of those vying to replace her have said Britain must leave the EU on its Oct. 31 deadline even if that means quitting without a deal.

“There is real threat now of an extremist Brexiteer becoming the leader of the Conservative Party and taking us over the cliff edge of a no deal,” McDonnell told Sky News, saying Labour was seeking to work with other opposition parties.

“We have got to move forward now, bring people together and block a no deal and if that means going back to the people (for a second referendum), so be it.”

(Reporting by Kylie MacLellan; Editing by Keith Weir)

Source: OANN

Britain's Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Michael Gove is seen outside the Cabinet Office in London
FILE PHOTO: Britain’s Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Michael Gove is seen outside the Cabinet Office in London, Britain May 14, 2019. REUTERS/Hannah Mckay

May 26, 2019

LONDON (Reuters) – Environment minister and prominent pro-Brexit campaigner Michael Gove said on Sunday he would be running to replace Theresa May as British prime minister, Sky News reported.

“I can confirm that I will be putting my name forward to be prime minister of this country,” Sky News quoted Gove as telling reporters outside his house.

“I believe that I’m ready to unite the Conservative and Unionist Party, ready to deliver Brexit, and ready to lead this great country.”

(Reporting by Kylie MacLellan; Editing by Keith Weir)

Source: OANN

Britain's former Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Esther McVey speaks during a
FILE PHOTO: Britain’s former Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Esther McVey speaks during a “Leave Means Leave” rally in London, Britain January 17, 2019. REUTERS/Simon Dawson

May 26, 2019

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain must quit the European Union at the end of October even if that means leaving without a deal, Conservative lawmaker Esther McVey, one of the candidates to succeed Theresa May as prime minister, said on Sunday.

“The 31st Oct is the key date and we are coming out then and if that means without a deal, then that is what it means,” McVey, a pro-Brexit former minister, told Sky News.

“That date is now fixed. We won’t be asking for any more extensions, that is part of the corrosive uncertainty that individuals, business and the country don’t want.”

(Reporting by Kylie MacLellan; Editing by Keith Weir)

Source: OANN


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