report

Ten Rohingya Muslim men with their hands bound kneel in Inn Din village
Ten Rohingya Muslim men with their hands bound kneel in Inn Din village, Myanmar, September 1, 2017. Handout via REUTERS

May 27, 2019

By Shoon Naing and Simon Lewis

YANGON (Reuters) – Myanmar has granted early release to seven soldiers jailed for the killing of 10 Rohingya Muslim men and boys during a 2017 military crackdown in the western state of Rakhine, two prison officials, two former fellow inmates and one of the soldiers told Reuters.

The soldiers were freed in November last year, the two inmates said, meaning they served less than one year of their 10-year prison terms for the killings at Inn Din village.

They also served less jail time than two Reuters reporters who uncovered the killings. The journalists, Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo, spent more than 16 months behind bars on charges of obtaining state secrets. The two were released in an amnesty on May 6.

Win Naing, the chief warden at Rakhine’s Sittwe Prison, and a senior prison official in the capital, Naypyitaw, confirmed that the convicted soldiers had not been in prison for some months.

“Their punishment was reduced by the military,” said the senior Naypyitaw official, who declined to be named.

Both prison officials declined to provide further details and said they did not know the exact date of the release, which was not announced publicly.

Military spokesmen Zaw Min Tun and Tun Tun Nyi declined to comment.

The seven soldiers were the only security personnel the military has said it has punished over the 2017 operation in Rakhine, which drove more than 730,000 Rohingya Muslims to flee to Bangladesh. U.N. investigators said the crackdown was executed with “genocidal intent” and included mass killings, gang rapes and widespread arson.

Myanmar denies widespread wrongdoing and officials have pointed to the jailing of the seven soldiers in the Inn Din case as evidence Myanmar security forces do not enjoy impunity.

“I would say that we took action against every case we could investigate,” the military’s commander in chief, Senior General Min Aung Hlaing, told officials from the U.N. Security Council in April last year, according to an account posted on his personal website.

The army chief cited the Inn Din case specifically. “The latest crime we punished was a killing, and ten years’ imprisonment was given to seven perpetrators,” he said. “We will not forgive anyone if they commit (a) crime.”

Reached by phone on Thursday, a man named Zin Paing Soe confirmed that he was one of the seven soldiers and that he was now free, but declined to comment further. “We were told to shut up,” he said.

‘FIRST STEP’

The 2017 campaign was launched across hundreds of villages in northern Rakhine in response to attacks by Rohingya insurgents. Reuters exposed the killings in a report published in February 2018. (Read the story here: https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/myanmar-rakhine-events)

Troops from the 33rd Light Infantry Division, a mobile force known for its brutal counter-insurgency campaigns, worked with members of a paramilitary police force and Buddhist vigilantes to drive out the entire Muslim population of Inn Din, burning and looting Rohingya homes and property, according to Buddhist and Muslim villagers and members of the security forces.

(Read more about the 33rd Light Infantry Division here: https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/myanmar-rohingya-battalions)

On Sept. 1, 2017, soldiers and some villagers detained a group of 10 Rohingya. The military said the men were “terrorists”; their family members said they were farmers, high school students and an Islamic teacher.

The next morning, witnesses said, Buddhist villagers hacked some of the Rohingya men with swords. The rest were shot by Myanmar troops and buried in a shallow grave.

The two Reuters reporters, Wa Lone, 33, and Kyaw Soe Oo, 29, discovered the grave and obtained pictures of the 10 men before and after they were killed. The journalists were arrested in December 2017 while investigating the killings and later sentenced to seven years in prison under the Official Secrets Act.

Defense lawyers argued their arrest and prosecution were aimed at blocking their reporting, and one police officer testified that a senior police official had ordered that the reporters be set up and arrested.

In April 2018, after launching an investigation into the killings, the military announced that four officers and three soldiers of other ranks had been dismissed from the military and sentenced to 10 years with hard labor for “contributing and participating in murder”. Neither their names nor details of their roles in the killing were disclosed.

Civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi welcomed the convictions, telling reporters at the time the sentencing was Myanmar’s “first step on the road of taking responsibility”.

Suu Kyi’s spokesman, Zaw Htay, did not pick up a call seeking comment on the release of the seven soldiers.

‘YEAR THAT CHANGED MY LIFE’

Two men who recently spent time in Sittwe Prison told Reuters the seven soldiers were well-known among prisoners there.

“We were in the same building but different cells,” said one of the men, Aung Than Wai, a political activist from Sittwe, who spent nearly six months in prison under a privacy law after he criticized a state official and posted an image of the official online.

Aung Than Wai, who was released from Sittwe in December, said he wanted to speak publicly about the soldiers’ early release because an ethnic Rakhine Buddhist villager also jailed over the Inn Din killings was still in prison. The villager, school teacher Tun Aye, is serving a five-year sentence for murder at Buthidaung Prison in northern Rakhine, said his lawyer, Khin Win.

The convicted soldiers in Sittwe were given beer and cigarettes even though such indulgences were off-limits to other prisoners, Aung Than Wai said.

The soldiers were also visited by army officials, said the second man who was in the prison at the time and asked not to be named. In November, the seven men were taken away in a military vehicle, he said.

The same month, Zin Paing Soe, one of the convicted soldiers, set up a new Facebook account, noting in his biography that he attended the military’s elite Defense Services Academy.

    In one of the account’s first public posts, he said he was looking forward to the end of a year spent mostly in prison.

“When will these unfortunate things end for me?” the post reads. “The year that totally changed my life: Fuck 2018.”

(Editing by Poppy McPherson and Nick Macfie)

Source: OANN

The right-wing parties in the European Union elections won in the U.K., France, and Italy as the nationalists who intend to chip away at E.U. power upped their share, The New York Times reported.

About one-quarter of the 751-seat EU will be controlled by populists, up from 20% a year ago, according to the report.

Among the most notable of the right-wing victories:

  • The National Rally party of Marine Le Pen in France, defeating Emmanuel Macron’s En Marche 24-22.5%, according to reports: “A vote for France, and for the people,” Le Pen said, per the Times.
  • Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party, which wants the U.K. to leave the EU without a deal, was in first place, with 32% of the vote, according to Bloomberg.
  • Matteo Salvini, an anti-immigrant populist, saw his League come in first at 30%, per exit polls, AP reported.

The story in Germany was a bit different as the Greens did well, finishing second (20.5% of the vote) to Chancellor Angela Merkel’s center-right Union bloc (28.9%), according to CNBC.

Source: NewsMax Politics

FILE PHOTO: Premier League - Newcastle United v Leicester City
FILE PHOTO: Soccer Football – Premier League – Newcastle United v Leicester City – St James’ Park, Newcastle, Britain – September 29, 2018 Newcastle United owner Mike Ashley REUTERS/Scott Heppell

May 27, 2019

(Reuters) – Mike Ashley has agreed to sell Newcastle United to Abu Dhabi’s billionaire Sheikh Khaled bin Zayed Al Nehayan for 350 million pounds ($445.24 million), the Sun reported late on Sunday.

The contracts between Ashley and Sheikh Khaled have been signed and submitted to the Premier League, according to the report.

Ashley, who bought a controlling stake in the Premier League club in 2007, has in the past tried to sell the club.

Ashley, who owns British sportswear retailer Sports Direct International Plc said last October that he had not received any acceptable offers for Newcastle, a year after he officially put the club up for sale, but told Sky News in December that talks on a deal had made promising progress.

Any potential buyer of the club must be able to provide transfer funds, he had said at the time.

Sheikh Khaled, the cousin of Manchester City owner and Arab billionaire Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed Al Nahyan, previously failed in his bid to buy Liverpool Football Club for 2 billion pounds last year, the Daily Mail has previously reported.

Sheikh Khaled is also the founder of Bin Zayed Group, a leading conglomerate with diverse business interests in the local and international markets.

Newcastle United, the Premier League and the Bin Zayed Group did not immediately respond to Reuters’ requests for comments.

(Reporting by Bhargav Acharya in Bengaluru; Editing by Susan Thomas)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: An oil well pump jack is seen at an oil field supply yard near Denver
FILE PHOTO: An oil well pump jack is seen at an oil field supply yard near Denver, Colorado, U.S., February 2, 2015. REUTERS/Rick Wilking/File Photo

May 27, 2019

By Henning Gloystein

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Oil prices rose on Monday as ongoing supply cuts led by producer club OPEC kept markets relatively tight, but Brent remained below $70 per barrel on concerns over an ongoing trade war between the United States and China.

Front-month Brent crude futures, the international benchmark for oil prices, were at $69.10 per barrel at 0021 GMT, up 41 cents, or 0.6 percent, from their last close.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were up 10 cents, or 0.2 percent, at $58.73 per barrel.

“The relative strength of the very short end of the curve likely reflects the market pricing in a known variable of lower supplies from OPEC+,” said Edward Bell, commodity analyst at Emirates NBD bank.

A group of producers led by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), known as OPEC+, has been withholding supply since the start of the year to tighten the market and prop up prices.

But Monday’s gain could not make up for falls last week, when both crude futures contracts registered their biggest price declines this year amid concerns that the Sino-American trade dispute could accelerate a global economic slowdown.

Money managers cut their net long U.S. crude futures and options positions in the week to May 21, the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) said on Friday.

“Some signs of low confidence are creeping into positioning data,” Bell said.

In oil futures markets, the trade war effect is better seen beyond the spot market.

“The impact from a trade war is a more medium- to long-term issue and Dec. spreads weakened sharply over the last week,” he said.

Beyond financial markets, there are also signs on the ground of a slowdown in oil demand growth.

China’s automobile sales, a key driver of global oil demand growth, will reach around 28.1 million units this year, unchanged from levels seen in 2018, when the country’s auto market contracted for the first time in more than two decades, state news agency Xinhua reported on Sunday.

The outlook for flat car sales may be too optimistic still, as monthly sales have so far declined for 10 consecutive months.

A bright spot for carmakers, although not for the oil industry, is that sales of new energy vehicles are likely to grow by about 27 percent to hit 1.6 million units, from 1.26 units in 2018, the report said.

(Reporting by Henning Gloystein; editing by Richard Pullin)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: Newly manufactured cars are seen at the automobile terminal in the port of Dalian
FILE PHOTO: Newly manufactured cars are seen at the automobile terminal in the port of Dalian, Liaoning province, China July 9, 2018. REUTERS/Stringer/File Photo

May 26, 2019

SHANGHAI (Reuters) – China’s automobile sales will reach around 28.1 million units this year, unchanged from 2018 levels, state news agency Xinhua reported on Sunday.

Citing a report jointly released by the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers and other parties, Xinhua said that sales of passenger units will be about 23.7 million units, a level also similar to that of last year.

Sales of new energy vehicles, however, are likely to remain buoyant and grow about 27 percent to hit 1.6 million units from 1.26 units in 2018, the report said.

The country’s auto market contracted last year for the first time in more than two decades due to softer domestic demand and a trade war with the United States. Monthly sales have so far declined for 10 consecutive months.

(Reporting by Brenda Goh; Editing by Shri Navaratnam)

Source: OANN

Police and prosecutors overreached by misusing a “sneak-and-peek” warrant meant to capture terrorists to arrest New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, legal experts told The Palm Beach Post in a weekend report.

Kraft was one of 25 men charged with soliciting prostitution after being caught on cameras inside the Orchids of Asia Day Spa in Jupiter, Florida paying two spa employees for sex, according to police reports.

The warrant was “completely uncalled for,” said John Wesley Hall, former president of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, calling it “an abuse of prosecutorial power and an abuse of police power.”

Earlier this month, two judges threw out video evidence, ruling not enough was done to protect the privacy of “legitimate” customers of the spa, since the video recorded their activities even when they did nothing wrong.

In sneak-and-peek cases, police will often stage a hoax to prevent the target from realizing he is the subject of a search, as in the Orchids of Asia case, when authorities used the ruse of a suspicious package outside the spa to evacuate employees to install the hidden cameras.

Police said they did so, because there was strong circumstantial evidence the spas were part of an international human trafficking ring.

But University of Miami adjunct professor Celeste Higgins said “we have traditional ways to get warrants so police can investigate . . . There’s all sorts of techniques that are tried and true and well within the Constitution.”

Jupiter police have argued the hidden cameras were the only way to confirm prostitution was taking place, and a circuit judge granted the warrant days before the cameras recorded Kraft and the other customers.

The use of such warrants has risen dramatically, with judges issuing more than 14,000 in 2016 after granting only 75 requests in 2006.

Related Stories:

Source: NewsMax Politics

Spread the love

In the first seven years after the Great Recession, Rick Dieterich found that his Mystic business, Springline Yacht Sales, was struggling. But things started looking up in 2016, and then in 2018 he did a record $3.6 million worth of sales.

With 2019 not even half over, he has done $3.9 million in sales and expects another $600,000 or so in the remaining months, most of which are “pretty dead” for sales.

He said the average sale is in the $400,000 range but called them “working people’s boats,” for which buyers typically take out a 20-year mortgage — as if they’re paying for a second home.

Dieterich notes there are “probably a multitude of factors involved” in the success of the past year or two, but he attributes part of it to the Connecticut General Assembly lowering the boat tax last year. Effective July 1, 2018, the sales tax on boats, boat engines and boat trailers went from 6.35 percent to 2.99 percent.

The rationale was to better compete with Rhode Island, which does not charge any sales tax on boat purchases. In New York, the combined county and state sales taxes means total sales taxes range from 7 percent to 8.875 percent, but only the first $230,000 of a boat’s price is taxable.

Kathleen Burns, executive director of the Connecticut Marine Trades Association, said the organization had been working for four years to get the tax lowered.

The budget proposal Gov. Ned Lamont introduced in February would revert the tax to 6.35 percent, whereas the Finance, Revenue and Bonding Committee revenue bill would keep it at 2.99 percent. Sen. Heather Somers, R-Groton, a passionate advocate for lowering the boat tax, called this a “very wise and thoughtful decision” on the part of the committee, but she doesn’t know what the final budget will look like.

Local boat dealers see positive impact of lower tax

Between the February proposal and the committee’s favorable report on its alternative in May was a public hearing on Senate Bill 877, a bill of revenue items to implement the budget. It was a wide-ranging hearing, with massage therapists, architects, accountants and more testifying to how additional taxes would hurt their industries.

Buried among the hours of testimony on March 15 were several people urging the retention of the 2.99 percent boat sales tax rate.

Burns said average boat sales were up 41 percent per month, marinas reported an occupancy rate increase from 65 to 78 percent, and 85 percent of all dealers hired additional full-time personnel since July 2018.

She also noted the winter season was up 8 percent over previous years, and “winter storage is the driver for off-season work, labor and parts that keeps the workforce employed year-round, avoiding layoffs and unemployment claims.”

Tasha Cusson of the Westbrook new and used boat dealer Atlantic Outboard said her company invested more than $1 million in the business in the past year, something it wouldn’t have done if employees thought the sales tax reduction was temporary.

Both Ron Helbig and Alexa Kangley of Noank Village Boatyard in Groton said if the boat tax is raised again, customers will go to other states — and so will marine industry jobs.

“When we lose boat sales and boat slips to neighboring states, we also (lose) tax revenue from restaurants, hotels, spas, entertainment venues, and more,” wrote Kate Mosley, marina manager of Saybrook Point Marina. “Raising occupancy and boat sales taxes will drive tourists and jobs out of the state, resulting in the overall LOSS of tax revenue.”

While Dieterich didn’t submit written testimony, he said he was at the Capitol wearing his “Don’t sink an industry” T-shirt. Asked about the local legislators who advocated for lowering the boat tax, Dieterich cited Somers, former Sen. Andrew Maynard and Rep. Joe de la Cruz, D-Groton.

Somers wanted the boat tax to be eliminated entirely, to be on a level playing field with Rhode Island, but 2.99 percent was the compromise. She said someone wrote her a thank-you note because he could finally afford a boat for his family. Somers stressed that many boat sales are “not mega-yachts” but ones costing about $20,000.

Don MacKenzie, president of Boats Incorporated in East Lyme, told The Day last week his company grew from 25 full-time employees last May to 29 now, and that his marina is full — a type of growth he hasn’t seen in years.

“It has been so tough competing with Rhode Island,” he said in a written message. “The lower rate has first and foremost kept CT customers in our state, and for those customers that may have been sitting on the fence, they are now buying. Not just has the boating industry benefitted, but so many local businesses have benefitted as well.”

The owners of Reynolds’ Boats in Lyme and the regional brokerage Brewer Yacht Sales also told The Day they’ve seen a positive impact on boat sales from the lower sales tax.

It’s difficult to measure the extent to which the lower tax is having a multiplier effect on others in marine industries. The general manager of Norwest Marine, which offers dock slips and Yamaha parts in Pawcatuck, said he hasn’t seen an impact. The owner of Dodson Boatyard, a service yard in Stonington Borough, said he hasn’t felt any impact from the lower boat tax.

Read More:
https://www.theday.com/article/20190525/BIZ02/190529587

Image Credit: Gerald Herbert/AP

German Bundesbank President Jens Weidmann presents the annual 2018 report in Frankfurt
German Bundesbank President Jens Weidmann presents the annual 2018 report in Frankfurt, Germany, February 27, 2019. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

May 26, 2019

FRANKFURT (Reuters) – European Central Bank policymaker and presidential hopeful Jens Weidmann said on Sunday he saw no need for the ECB to change its policy at present, despite a weaker euro zone economy.

The ECB’s Governing Council is due to meet on June 5-6 and decide on the terms of its third round of cheap loans to banks – one of several measures it has deployed to stimulate lending in the bloc.

“This isn’t a situation where prices are falling and we have to react now,” the head of Germany’s central bank told members of the public at the Bundesbank’s open days.

Weidmann added decreasing spare capacity in the economy, namely the extent to which labor, capital and other resources are used below their maximum level, would eventually push up prices.

These have been growing at a slower pace than the ECB’s target of “close, but below 2%” for years despite the central bank’s unprecedented stimulus measures.

Weidmann, a guardian of German economic orthodoxy who has often opposed the ECB’s easy policy, is one of the hot names in the race to replace Mario Draghi as President in November.

But he may face opposition from indebted countries in the bloc’s south, which favor lower interest rates.

“Surely it would be bad to give the impression that certain nationalities are fundamentally excluded from the ECB Presidency,” Weidmann said.

“That would be the opposite of what we want to achieve, which is acceptance.”

(Reporting By Frank Siebelt; Writing by Francesco Canepa; Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky)

Source: OANN

German Bundesbank President Jens Weidmann presents the annual 2018 report in Frankfurt
German Bundesbank President Jens Weidmann presents the annual 2018 report in Frankfurt, Germany, February 27, 2019. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach

May 26, 2019

FRANKFURT (Reuters) – European Central Bank policymaker and presidential hopeful Jens Weidmann said on Sunday he saw no need for the ECB to change its policy at present, despite a weaker euro zone economy.

The ECB’s Governing Council is due to meet on June 5-6 and decide on the terms of its third round of cheap loans to banks – one of several measures it has deployed to stimulate lending in the bloc.

“This isn’t a situation where prices are falling and we have to react now,” the head of Germany’s central bank told members of the public at the Bundesbank’s open days.

Weidmann added decreasing spare capacity in the economy, namely the extent to which labor, capital and other resources are used below their maximum level, would eventually push up prices.

These have been growing at a slower pace than the ECB’s target of “close, but below 2%” for years despite the central bank’s unprecedented stimulus measures.

Weidmann, a guardian of German economic orthodoxy who has often opposed the ECB’s easy policy, is one of the hot names in the race to replace Mario Draghi as President in November.

But he may face opposition from indebted countries in the bloc’s south, which favor lower interest rates.

“Surely it would be bad to give the impression that certain nationalities are fundamentally excluded from the ECB Presidency,” Weidmann said.

“That would be the opposite of what we want to achieve, which is acceptance.”

(Reporting By Frank Siebelt; Writing by Francesco Canepa; Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky)

Source: OANN

President Trump on Friday said that he wants Attorney General William Barr to investigate the UK, Australia and Ukraine for their roles in the ‘greatest hoax in the history of our country.’

Speaking with reporters at the White House on Friday before his trip to Japan, Trump discussed his decision this week to issue a sweeping declassification order – leaving it in the hands of Barr to determine exactly what happened to Trump and his campaign before and after the 2016 US election.

“For over a year, people have asked me to declassify. What I’ve done is declassified everything,” said Trump, adding “He can look and I hope he looks at the UK and I hope he looks at Australia and I hope he looks at Ukraine.”

“It’s the greatest hoax probably in the history of our country and somebody has to get to the bottom of it. We’ll see. For a long period of time, they wanted me to declassify and I did.”

(UK, Australia, Ukraine comment at 2:30)

“This is about finding out what happened,” said Trump. “What happened and when did it happen, because this was an attempted takedown of the president of the United States, and we have to find out why.”

“We’re exposing everything. We’re being a word that you like, transparent. We’re being, ultimately we’re being transparent. That’s what it’s about. Again, this should never ever happen in our country again.”

After the Mueller report made clear that Trump and his campaign had in no way conspired with Russia during hte 2016 election, Democrats immediately pivoted to whether Trump obstructed the investigation. Trump and his supporters, however, immediately pivoted to the conduct of the US intelligence community, including the involvement of foreign actors and possibly their governments.

According to a report last week, the discredited “Steele Dossier” – assembled by former MI6 spy Christopher Steele – was referred to as “crown material” in an email exchange suggesting that former FBI Director James Comey insisted that CIA Director John Brennan pushed for the inclusion of the dossier in the intelligence community assessment (ICA) on Russian interference.

Moreover, much of “Operation Crossfire Hurricane” – the FBI’s official investigation into the Trump campaign – occurred on UK soil, which is perhaps why the New York Times reported last September that the UK begged Trump not to declassify ‘Russiagate’ documents ‘without redaction.’

Shortly after he announced his involvement with the Trump campaign, aide George Papadopoulos was lured to London in March, 2016, where Maltese professor and self-described Clinton foundation member Joseph Mifsud fed him the rumor that Russia had damaging information on Hillary Clinton. It was later at a London bar that Papadopoulos would drunkenly pass the rumor to Australian diplomat Alexander Downer (who FBI agent Peter Strzok flew to London to meet with the day after Crossfire Hurricane was launched).

Joseph Mifsud, George Papadopoulos

Two weeks laterPapadopoulos would be bilked for information by Australian diplomat (another Clinton ally) Alexander Downer at a London bar, who relayed the Russia rumor to Australian authorities, which alerted the FBI (as the story goes), which ‘officially’ kicked off the US intelligence investigation.

As for Ukraine, a Ukrainian court ruled in December that the country meddled in the US election when they revealed details of suspected illegal payments to former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort.

In 2016, while Mr. Manafort was chairman of the Trump campaign, anti-corruption prosecutors in Ukraine disclosed that a pro-Russian political party had earmarked payments for Mr. Manafort from an illegal slush fund. Mr. Manafort resigned from the campaign a week later. –New York Times

Last week, President Trump’s attorney Rudy Giuliani met with a former Ukrainian diplomat, Andril Telizhenko, who has previously suggested that the DNC worked with the Kiev government in 2016 to dig up ‘dirt’ on then-candidate Donald Trump. Giuliani told the Washington Post in a Friday interview that Telizhenko “was in Washington and he came up to New York, and we spent most of the afternoon together,” adding “When I have something to say, I’ll say it.”

This comes on the heels of Giuliani canceling a trip to Ukraine to meet with President-elect Volodymyr Zelensky to discuss the Manafort situation.

According to The Hill‘s John Solomon,

A former DNC operative steeped in Trump-Russia research approached the Ukrainian government looking for ‘dirt’ on then-candidate Donald Trump during the 2016 US election, citing written answers to questions submitted to Ambassador Valeriy Chaly’s office.

Chaly confirmed that DNC insider of Ukrainian heritage, Alexandra Chalupa, approached Ukraine seeking information on Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort’s dealings inside the country, in the hopes of exposing them to Congress.

Chalupa, who told Politico in 2017 that she had “developed a network of sources in Kiev and Washington, including investigative journalists, government officials and private intelligence operatives,” said she “occasionally shared her findings with officials from the DNC and Clinton’s campaign.

In short, a DNC operative of Ukrainian heritage, who shared information with the Clinton campaign and worked with a convicted terrorist to spread misinformation to undermine the legitimacy of the 2016 election, approached the government of Ukraine in the hopes of obtaining “dirt” that would hurt the Trump campaign.

And Trump wants AG Barr to look at it all. He’ll be visiting the UK next month, meanwhile, where he can ask outgoing PM Theresa May, or the Queen, all about it.

Source: InfoWars


Current track

Title

Artist