review

ATP 1000 - Italian Open
Tennis – ATP 1000 – Italian Open – Foro Italico, Rome, Italy – May 19, 2019 Serbia’s Novak Djokovic celebrates during the final against Spain’s Rafael Nadal REUTERS/Matteo Ciambelli

May 26, 2019

By Martyn Herman

(Reuters) – Novak Djokovic stands on the verge of holding all four Grand Slam titles for the second time in his career and should he do it by winning the French Open, it would surpass anything Rafael Nadal or Roger Federer have achieved, said Mats Wilander.

Three years ago Djokovic became the first man since Australian great Rod Laver in 1969 to hold all four Grand Slams simultaneously when he beat Andy Murray to win the French Open.

A career slump followed but the Serb rebounded last year to win Wimbledon and the U.S. Open and this year took his Grand Slam total to 15 after holding aloft the Australian Open trophy for a seventh time.

Now he has the chance to win four in a row again and seven-time Grand Slam champion Wilander believes victory in Paris would pave the way to surpass both Federer (20) and Nadal (17) in Grand Slam titles.

“In the grand scheme of things Novak winning four in a row again, it would be the most impressive thing we have ever seen,” Eurosport analyst Wilander told Reuters in an interview.

The greatest of all time (GOAT) debate usually splits fans into the Federer and Nadal camps and Djokovic earns less adulation than those two.

“If Novak wins the French, suddenly then he has to be compared to the greatest players of all time,” Wilander said.

“He will have 16 (slams) if he wins the French. Okay Roger will still have 20 but it would be comparable because he would have won the Nole Slam twice, I mean that’s unbelievable.

“To me that’s incredible, Novak winning here is a bigger deal than Rafa winning 12 (French Opens). But then if Rafa wins, he’s on 18 majors so it’s getting crowded at the top.”

Wilander said the French Open was ‘monumental’ in terms of the longevity of Nadal’s career, saying a failure to retain his crown could have knock-on effects for the Spaniard.

“I think the bigger picture for me is more long term,” Wilander, part of Eurosport’s daily ‘Game Schett and Mats’ review of the action in Paris, said.

“If Rafa doesn’t win the French, I kind of see him having a hard time winning Wimbledon or the U.S. Open… then next year’s French Open comes into doubt.

“If Novak wins I mean the door will be wide open to reach 20 Grand Slams. Then if he equals Roger’s 20 he would be regarded as the greatest player of all time.”

That said, Wilander says this year’s men’s tournament is more open than usual with a host of young players such as Greek Stefanos Tsitsipas, Austrian Dominic Thiem, Russians Karen Khachanov and Daniil Medvedev and Chilean Cristian Garin equipped to cause trouble.

“So many guys hit the ball so hard today,” Wilander said. I’m not saying they will necessarily beat them but the worry for Novak or Rafa is how many matches will they be pushed to over the four hour mark in the first four rounds?

“Rafa, Roger or Novak against (Grigor) Dimitrov or (Kei) Nishikori, they have great records against them, but if Rafa played Tsitsipas he would be nervous from the first point.

“The young guys have less respect for reputations.”

(Reporting by Martyn Herman, editing by Pritha Sarkar)

Source: OANN

ATP 1000 - Italian Open
Tennis – ATP 1000 – Italian Open – Foro Italico, Rome, Italy – May 19, 2019 Serbia’s Novak Djokovic celebrates during the final against Spain’s Rafael Nadal REUTERS/Matteo Ciambelli

May 26, 2019

By Martyn Herman

(Reuters) – Novak Djokovic stands on the verge of holding all four Grand Slam titles for the second time in his career and should he do it by winning the French Open, it would surpass anything Rafael Nadal or Roger Federer have achieved, said Mats Wilander.

Three years ago Djokovic became the first man since Australian great Rod Laver in 1969 to hold all four Grand Slams simultaneously when he beat Andy Murray to win the French Open.

A career slump followed but the Serb rebounded last year to win Wimbledon and the U.S. Open and this year took his Grand Slam total to 15 after holding aloft the Australian Open trophy for a seventh time.

Now he has the chance to win four in a row again and seven-time Grand Slam champion Wilander believes victory in Paris would pave the way to surpass both Federer (20) and Nadal (17) in Grand Slam titles.

“In the grand scheme of things Novak winning four in a row again, it would be the most impressive thing we have ever seen,” Eurosport analyst Wilander told Reuters in an interview.

The greatest of all time (GOAT) debate usually splits fans into the Federer and Nadal camps and Djokovic earns less adulation than those two.

“If Novak wins the French, suddenly then he has to be compared to the greatest players of all time,” Wilander said.

“He will have 16 (slams) if he wins the French. Okay Roger will still have 20 but it would be comparable because he would have won the Nole Slam twice, I mean that’s unbelievable.

“To me that’s incredible, Novak winning here is a bigger deal than Rafa winning 12 (French Opens). But then if Rafa wins, he’s on 18 majors so it’s getting crowded at the top.”

Wilander said the French Open was ‘monumental’ in terms of the longevity of Nadal’s career, saying a failure to retain his crown could have knock-on effects for the Spaniard.

“I think the bigger picture for me is more long term,” Wilander, part of Eurosport’s daily ‘Game Schett and Mats’ review of the action in Paris, said.

“If Rafa doesn’t win the French, I kind of see him having a hard time winning Wimbledon or the U.S. Open… then next year’s French Open comes into doubt.

“If Novak wins I mean the door will be wide open to reach 20 Grand Slams. Then if he equals Roger’s 20 he would be regarded as the greatest player of all time.”

That said, Wilander says this year’s men’s tournament is more open than usual with a host of young players such as Greek Stefanos Tsitsipas, Austrian Dominic Thiem, Russians Karen Khachanov and Daniil Medvedev and Chilean Cristian Garin equipped to cause trouble.

“So many guys hit the ball so hard today,” Wilander said. I’m not saying they will necessarily beat them but the worry for Novak or Rafa is how many matches will they be pushed to over the four hour mark in the first four rounds?

“Rafa, Roger or Novak against (Grigor) Dimitrov or (Kei) Nishikori, they have great records against them, but if Rafa played Tsitsipas he would be nervous from the first point.

“The young guys have less respect for reputations.”

(Reporting by Martyn Herman, editing by Pritha Sarkar)

Source: OANN

EPP final campaign event ahead of the EU election, in Munich
German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks during Manfred Weber’s, candidate of the European People’s Party (EPP) for the next European Commission President, final campaign event ahead of the EU election in Munich, Germany, May 24, 2019. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

May 26, 2019

By Madeline Chambers

BERLIN (Reuters) – Voters in the northern state of Bremen look set to inflict a humiliating blow on Germany’s Social Democrats (SPD) in an election on Sunday that could hasten the end of their loveless federal coalition with Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservatives.

Polls in Germany’s smallest state, focused on the port city of the same name, are tight but indicate the SPD risks losing a stronghold it has ruled for 73 years. No other German state has been ruled by the same party for so long.

Elections to the European Parliament on the same day as Bremen’s parliamentary vote could pile further pressure on Merkel’s “grand coalition”, with both conservatives and SPD likely to suffer heavy losses.

First projections for both are due at 1800 CET (1600 GMT).

If the SPD loses Bremen to the conservative Christian Democrats (CDU), pressure will mount on party leader Andrea Nahles to stand down or break with the federal coalition.

In a sign of growing unrest inside the SPD, German weekly Bild am Sonntag reported that former party leader Martin Schulz wants to replace Nahles as chief.

An SPD spokeswoman said that Nahles and Schulz were in regular discussions, declining to comment on the content of confidential talks.

Bremen has the highest jobless level of any German state. Most recent polls suggest there is scope for three outcomes in Bremen: a grand coalition of the SPD and CDU; a coalition of the CDU, Greens and the business-friendly FDP; or a coalition of SPD with the far-left Die Linke party and the Greens.

REVIEWING COALITION

Many among the SPD’s rank and file are fed up with serving as Merkel’s allies, a thankless role the party has fulfilled in 10 of the last 14 years and which has left the chancellor to steal the limelight, especially on the international stage.

The party reluctantly re-entered a Merkel-led coalition last year after slumping to its weakest level since 1933 in the 2017 federal election. It has since sunk even lower, polling at about 17 percent, more than 10 points behind the conservatives.

The party is due to review the coalition by the end of the year and pressure from members could grow to ditch it and instead reinvigorate its leftist roots in opposition.

Such a move could force a snap federal election, an unappealing option for both the SPD and conservative bloc, or possibly the formation of a different coalition which would be a tricky task.

Either of those scenarios could hasten Merkel’s exit, a subject of increasing speculation since she handed the CDU leadership to her protege Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer last year.

In Bremen, a new face for the CDU, IT businessman Carsten Meyer-Heder, senses a “mood for change”. Polls put him one point ahead of experienced SPD mayor Carsten Sieling, who is hoping voters will opt for a “safe pair of hands”.

(Additional reporting by Markus Wacket, Andreas Rinke and Christoph Steitz; Editing by David Holmes/Keith Weir)

Source: OANN

EPP final campaign event ahead of the EU election, in Munich
German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks during Manfred Weber’s, candidate of the European People’s Party (EPP) for the next European Commission President, final campaign event ahead of the EU election in Munich, Germany, May 24, 2019. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

May 26, 2019

By Madeline Chambers

BERLIN (Reuters) – Voters in the northern state of Bremen look set to inflict a humiliating blow on Germany’s Social Democrats (SPD) in an election on Sunday that could hasten the end of their loveless federal coalition with Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservatives.

Polls in Germany’s smallest state, focused on the port city of the same name, are tight but indicate the SPD risks losing a stronghold it has ruled for 73 years. No other German state has been ruled by the same party for so long.

Elections to the European Parliament on the same day as Bremen’s parliamentary vote could pile further pressure on Merkel’s “grand coalition”, with both conservatives and SPD likely to suffer heavy losses.

First projections for both are due at 1800 CET (1600 GMT).

If the SPD loses Bremen to the conservative Christian Democrats (CDU), pressure will mount on party leader Andrea Nahles to stand down or break with the federal coalition.

In a sign of growing unrest inside the SPD, German weekly Bild am Sonntag reported that former party leader Martin Schulz wants to replace Nahles as chief.

An SPD spokeswoman said that Nahles and Schulz were in regular discussions, declining to comment on the content of confidential talks.

Bremen has the highest jobless level of any German state. Most recent polls suggest there is scope for three outcomes in Bremen: a grand coalition of the SPD and CDU; a coalition of the CDU, Greens and the business-friendly FDP; or a coalition of SPD with the far-left Die Linke party and the Greens.

REVIEWING COALITION

Many among the SPD’s rank and file are fed up with serving as Merkel’s allies, a thankless role the party has fulfilled in 10 of the last 14 years and which has left the chancellor to steal the limelight, especially on the international stage.

The party reluctantly re-entered a Merkel-led coalition last year after slumping to its weakest level since 1933 in the 2017 federal election. It has since sunk even lower, polling at about 17 percent, more than 10 points behind the conservatives.

The party is due to review the coalition by the end of the year and pressure from members could grow to ditch it and instead reinvigorate its leftist roots in opposition.

Such a move could force a snap federal election, an unappealing option for both the SPD and conservative bloc, or possibly the formation of a different coalition which would be a tricky task.

Either of those scenarios could hasten Merkel’s exit, a subject of increasing speculation since she handed the CDU leadership to her protege Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer last year.

In Bremen, a new face for the CDU, IT businessman Carsten Meyer-Heder, senses a “mood for change”. Polls put him one point ahead of experienced SPD mayor Carsten Sieling, who is hoping voters will opt for a “safe pair of hands”.

(Additional reporting by Markus Wacket, Andreas Rinke and Christoph Steitz; Editing by David Holmes/Keith Weir)

Source: OANN

In what has become an unprecedented partisan abuse of legislative power, the Democrats have made a series of moves intended on undermining the Executive office at the expense of our Constitutional Republic.

In the epicenter of the madness, Washington DC Impeachment zealots are scurrying around the hallowed halls of Congress in a desperate bid to distract the public from the growing panic regarding the Spygate investigation into the Obama Administration, which could pull the rug out from under the Democrats’ chances in the upcoming election.

AP reports, “President Donald Trump on Thursday granted Attorney General William Barr new powers to review and potentially release classified information related to the origins of the Russia investigation…Trump is giving Barr a new tool in his investigation, empowering his attorney general to unilaterally unseal documents that the Justice Department has historically regarded as among its most highly secret.”

Trump explicitly delegated Barr with declassification power — noting it would not automatically extend to another attorney general — and only for use in the review of the Russia investigation. Before using the new authority, Barr should consult with intelligence officials “to the extent he deems it practicable,” Trump wrote in a memo formalizing the matter.

Outside Washington DC, congressional Democrats are wreaking havoc on the future of the Presidential election, whether their constituents want it or not. 18 states are considering bills that would require Presidential candidates to disclose their taxes in order to be on the 2020 election ballot. Out of those 18 States, only Vermont would require candidates for governor and other statewide offices to disclose at least part of their tax returns.

Meanwhile, as the Washington Times reports, the Nevada Senate approved a National Popular Vote bill, intended on undermining the electoral college, which now goes to the Democratic Gov. Steve Sisolak’s desk.

“Assembly Bill 186 would bring Nevada into the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact. Nevada would become the 16th jurisdiction to join the compact, along with 14 states and the District of Columbia.”

Source: InfoWars

FILE PHOTO: Voters queue to cast their ballots in Malawi's presidential and legislative elections, in Lilongwe
FILE PHOTO: Voters queue to cast their ballots in Malawi’s presidential and legislative elections, in Lilongwe, Malawi, May 21, 2019. Picture taken May 21, 2019. REUTERS/Eldson Chagara

May 25, 2019

By Frank Phiri and Mabvuto Banda

BLANTYRE/LILONGWE, Malawi (Reuters) – Final results of Malawi’s presidential elections will be delayed, the electoral commission (MEC) said on Saturday after the high court ordered a review of the polls following opposition allegations of tampering.

Voters cast ballots for a president, parliament and ward councillors on May 21, with President Peter Mutharika’s ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) facing stiff competition from the Malawi Congress Party (MCP), which filed the complaints alleging intimidation and tampering by the DPP.

The Malawian High Court ordered the MEC not to release results of the presidential vote until a judicial review of the complaints had been heard and results from 10 districts were verified.

Malawian law says complaints must be resolved within the maximum eight days between polling and the announcement of results. But chairwoman of the MEC Justice Jane Ansah said the results would be delayed until matters cited by the court were resolved.

“Presidential results have been withheld until we resolve the issue of the court injunction which we have received. We are dealing with all complaints,” Ansah told a press briefing.

The MEC has confirmed receiving 147 cases of irregularities, most to do with the use of results sheets which had sections blotted out and altered with correction fluid.

Protests have broken out in Malawi’s administrative capital Lilongwe, an opposition stronghold, prompting police to deploy armored trucks to the area where people were tearing down ruling DDP posters and hurling rocks at government buildings.

President Mutharika, 78, came to power in 2014 and is credited with improving infrastructure and lowering inflation, but has recently faced accusations of corruption and of favoring rural regions where his support is strongest.

(Reporting by Frank Phiri in Blantyre and Mabvuto Banda in Lilongwe; Writing by Mfuneko Toyana; Editing by David Holmes)

Source: OANN

President Donald Trump said Friday he “may very well talk” to Prime Minister Theresa May about potential spying on the 2016 campaign by the Five Eyes intelligence alliance of Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States.

In remarks Trump made before departing on a trip to Japan, the president touched on an issue that he’s made a priority: the origins of the FBI Russia probe.

“Mr. President, are you going to talk to Theresa May about potential Five Eyes spying into your campaign,” he was asked.

“I may very well talk to her about that, yeah,” he responded, according to a transcript of the remarks released by the Office of the Press Secretary.

“There’s word and rumor that the FBI and others were involved, CIA were involved, with the U.K., having to do with the Russian hoax,” he continued. “And I may very well talk to her about that, yes.”

Trump on Thursday issued an order allowing Attorney General William Barr to declassify any information Barr sees fit during his review of the events that prompted the FBI to open an investigation into links between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Source: NewsMax Politics

The Health and Human Services Department on Friday released a proposed regulation that in effect says “gender identity” is not protected under federal laws that prohibit sex discrimination in health care. It would reverse an Obama-era policy that the Trump administration already is not enforcing.

“The actions today are part and parcel of this administration’s efforts to erase LGBTQ people from federal regulations and to undermine nondiscrimination protections across the board,” said Omar Gonzalez-Pagan, a senior attorney on health care at Lambda Legal, a civil rights organization representing LGBT people.

The administration also has moved to restrict military service by transgender men and women , proposed allowing certain homeless shelters to take gender identity into account in offering someone a bed for the night and concluded in a 2017 Justice Department memo that federal civil rights law does not protect transgender people from discrimination at work. As one of her first policy moves, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos withdrew guidance that allowed students to use bathrooms matching their gender identity.

More than 1.5 million Americans identify as transgender , according to the Williams Institute, a think tank focusing on LGBT policy at the UCLA School of Law. A bigger number — 4.5% of the population— identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT), according to Gallup.

Pushing back against critics, the HHS official overseeing the new regulation said transgender patients would continue to be protected by other federal laws that bar discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age and disability.

“Everyone deserves to be treated with dignity and respect,” said Roger Severino, who heads the HHS Office for Civil Rights. “We intend to fully enforce federal laws that prohibit discrimination.”

Asked about the charge that the administration has opened the door to discrimination against transgender people seeking needed medical care of any type, Severino responded, “I don’t want to see that happen.”

In some places LGBT people are protected by state laws, said Lambda Legal attorney Gonzalez-Pagan, “but what do you say to people living in a state that doesn’t have state-explicit protections? Do they move their home?”

Behind the dispute over legal rights is a medically recognized condition called “gender dysphoria” — discomfort or distress caused by a discrepancy between the gender that a person identifies as and the gender at birth. Consequences can include severe depression. Treatment can range from sex-reassignment surgery and hormones to people changing their outward appearance by adopting a different hairstyle or clothing.

Many social conservatives disagree with the concept.

“Sex is not subjective, it is an objective biological reality,” Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, said in a statement supporting the Trump administration’s move. The proposed rule will ensure that federal law “isn’t used as a vehicle to advance transgender or abortion politics,” he said.

Under the Obama-era federal rule, a hospital could be required to perform gender-transition procedures such as hysterectomies if the facility provided that kind of treatment for other medical conditions. The rule was meant to carry out the anti-discrimination section of the Affordable Care Act, which bars sex discrimination in health care but does not use the term “gender identity.”

The proposed new rule would also affect the notices that millions of patients get in multiple languages about their rights to translation services. Such notices often come with insurer “explanation of benefits” forms. The Trump administration says the notice requirement has become a needless burden on health care providers, requiring billions of paper notices to be mailed annually at an estimated five-year cost of $3.2 billion.

The American Civil Liberties Union served notice it expects to challenge the rule in court when it is final. Louise Melling, ACLU deputy legal director said the potential impact could go beyond LGBT people and also subject women to discrimination for having had an abortion.

That’s because the proposal would remove “termination of pregnancy” as grounds for making a legal claim of sex discrimination in health care, one of the protections created in the Obama years. Abortion opponents had argued that the Obama regulation could be construed to make a legal argument for federal funding of abortions.

UCLA legal scholar Jocelyn Samuels, who oversaw the drafting of the HHS transgender anti-discrimination rule under Obama, said that rule reflected established legal precedent that transgender people are protected by federal anti-discrimination laws.

“This administration has manifested its intent to roll back that well-considered understanding in every context,” she said.

Samuels questioned the timing of the Trump action, since the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear three cases this year looking at whether federal civil rights law bans job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

The proposed rule change is unlikely to have immediate consequences beyond the realm of political and legal debate. It faces a 60-day comment period and another layer of review before it can be finalized.

HHS official Severino said the Trump administration is going back to the literal text of the ACA’s anti-discrimination law to correct an overly broad interpretation.

The Obama rule dates to a time when LGBT people were gaining political and social recognition. But a federal judge in Texas has said the rule went too far by concluding that discrimination on the basis of gender identity is a form of sex discrimination.

Severino said the proposed rule does not come with a new definition of a person’s sex. Earlier, a leaked internal document suggested the administration was debating whether to issue an immutable definition of sex, as based on a person’s genital organs at birth.

Source: NewsMax Politics

FILE PHOTO - U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) holds her weekly news conference with Capitol Hill reporters in Washington
FILE PHOTO – U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) holds her weekly news conference with Capitol Hill reporters in Washington, U.S., May 23, 2019. REUTERS/James Lawler Duggan

May 24, 2019

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump, engaged in personal attacks on House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi, retweeted a heavily edited video that falsely claimed the Democratic leader had difficulty speaking to reporters.

In a Twitter posting late on Thursday, the Republican president wrote, “PELOSI STAMMERS THROUGH NEWS CONFERENCE.” Accompanying the tweet was a heavily edited Fox Business Network clip of Pelosi’s 23-minute news conference earlier in the day.

At the bottom of the Fox Business screen is the headline, “Pelosi Urges Trump ‘Intervention”; Stammers Through News Conference.” The one-minute-and-47-second segment included critical commentary about Pelosi.

During her news conference on Thursday, Pelosi suggested that Trump aides or family members hold an “intervention” with him to address his anger over House investigations of the president and his business dealings.

In recent days, as Trump ramped up his attacks on Pelosi, some heavily edited videos have circulated on the internet that alter the cadence of her words by slowing them down, making her speech seem slurred when in fact it is not.

A Reuters review of Pelosi’s news conference on Thursday shows her covering a wide range of topics and speaking in a mostly animated way, jousting with reporters at times and at other times reading from a statement.

Like many politicians, she occasionally stumbled over a word before correcting herself.

Without reading from a statement, Pelosi discussed infrastructure investments throughout U.S. history. She recounted actions taken during President Thomas Jefferson’s administration during the early 1800s and moved effortlessly through the presidencies of Theodore Roosevelt 100 years later and Dwight Eisenhower in the middle of the 20th century.

Nonetheless, the Fox Business video depicted Pelosi stumbling over words and replayed four times in rapid succession the speaker holding up two fingers when talking about “three things” related to House investigations of Trump.

In the actual video of the news conference, she mistakenly held up two fingers when talking about those three elements, but then corrected herself by holding up three fingers.

At the White House on Friday, before departing on a trip to Japan, Trump was asked by a reporter about altered videos of Pelosi.

He responded that he did not know anything about the videos, and echoed an assertion he made on Thursday that the speaker, who is 79, has “lost it.”

“Look, you think Nancy is the same as she was? She’s not. Maybe we can all say that,” Trump, 72, said on Friday.

He blamed Pelosi for starting the fight. “She said terrible things. So I just responded in kind.”

The White House did not respond to further requests for comment.

A spokesman for Pelosi, asked about Trump retweeting the Fox Business video, said Republican attacks on the California congresswoman actually helped Democrats win control of the House in last November’s elections when a record number of women and minorities were elected to Congress.

Senator Amy Klobuchar, who is seeking the Democratic nomination for president in next year’s elections, said in an interview on CNN, “It is unbelievable to me that the president would be involved in this kind of disinformation campaign.”

She said such incidents highlight the need for legislation to bring transparency to online political ads, as well as new privacy protections.

(Reporting by Richard Cowan, Roberta Rampton and Doina Chiacu; editing by Jonathan Oatis)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO - U.S. President Donald Trump boards Marine One to depart for Japan
FILE PHOTO – U.S. President Donald Trump leaves the Oval Office to speak to the news media before boarding Marine One to depart for travel to Japan from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., May 24, 2019. REUTERS/Leah Millis

May 24, 2019

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump, saying there is a national emergency because of tensions with Iran, is clearing the sale of billions of dollars worth of weapons to Saudi Arabia and other countries, U.S. senators said on Friday, despite strong resistance to the plan from both Republicans and Democrats.

The administration has informed congressional committees that it will go ahead with 22 arms deals worth some $8 billion, congressional aides said, sweeping aside a long-standing precedent for congressional review of such sales.

(Reporting by Patricia Zengerle; Editing by James Dalgleish)

Source: OANN


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