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Trump: US ‘locked and loaded’ against attackers of Saudi oil facility ‘depending on verification’; Iran denies involvement

President Trump on Sunday suggested U.S. investigators had “reason to believe” they knew who launched crippling attacks against a key Saudi oil facility, and vowed that America was “locked and loaded depending on verification.” While he did not specify in his tweet who he believed See More was responsible for Saturday’s drone attacks, U.S. investigators previously have pointed the finger at Iran. For its part, Iran has denied the allegations. Earlier Sunday, Trump authorized the use of emergency oil reserves in Texas and other states after Saudi oil processing facilities were attacked, sparking fears of a spike in oil prices when markets reopen Monday.

New York Times updates Kavanaugh ‘bombshell’ to note accuser doesn’t recall alleged assault

More than 49,000 auto workers go on strike against GM

Trump: US ‘locked and loaded’ against attackers of Saudi oil facility ‘depending on verification’; Iran denies involvement

Beto hits Buttigieg, Dems with expletive-driven defense of debate comments on gun confiscation

Lori Loughlin ‘aware’ of Huffman’s sentence, regrets rejecting plea deal

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New Border wall in ‘smuggler’s gulch’ is working according to CBP agents

Justin De La Torre stated a steep, open canyon between San Diego and Tijuana has been used for decades by immigrants to smuggle drugs into the U.S. from Mexico.

“It has an anti-climb feature, it’s made of steel, it also has a concrete base that prevents digging from underneath, and now we’re able to control this area with the new infrastructure.”

According to California Border Patrol agents, new infrastructure in an area known as “smuggler’s gulch” is making a difference.

President Trump moved to replace the fencing along the San Diego border earlier this year as his administration sped up moves to build taller, stronger border reinforcement.

“This is a smart, strategic, see-through steel barrier — not just a simple concrete wall,”

said the president.

“It will be deployed in the areas identified by border agents as having the greatest need, and as these agents will tell you, where walls go up, illegal crossings go way down.”

Numerous wall construction projects are underway across the Southwest border, including projects in California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. — CBP (@CBP) August 25, 2019

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Twitter locked accounts belonging to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s re-election campaign and several prominent conservatives Monday, after they posted videos of left-wing protesters gathered outside McConnell’s Kentucky home — with one demonstrator calling for someone to stab McConnell “in the heart” and for McConnell to break his “raggedy” neck. Capitol Hill communications director Ben Goldey said that he, too, had been locked out of Twitter.

“My account was temporarily suspended after posting a video of far-left activists chanting death threats at Senator McConnell,” Goldey wrote on Twitter.

“Meanwhile, @Castro4Congress tweet, targeting his own constituents by name and employer is still up and does not violate Twitter’s Rules.”

“Mitch McConnell has people on his yard threatening to “stab the motherf******” in the heart” & @twitter suspends MCCONNELL from its platform,”

Jennings wrote on Twitter.

“This nation needs to heal & this platform is actively removing voices from the conversation who can help find solutions. Absolute garbage.””Just stab the m—– f—– in the heart,”

Helm said, after a fellow demonstrator referenced a McConnell voodoo doll. Former McConnell aide and political commentator Scott Jennings also called the situation inexplicable.

“McConnell doesn’t care about people who actually do break their necks, who need insulin, who need any type of medication, because they want to stop and prevent health care for all,”

Helm said.

“And that is something that every American out here wants. There’s only a few Americans who don’t want that”

Twitter declined to provide an on-the-record comment. Because the video included an explicit call for violence, and took place steps away from McConnell’s residence, it apparently violated Twitter’s rules for anyone to post the video — including McConnell and his supporters. McConnell, 77, has been resting at home since tripping on his patio fracturing his shoulder on Sunday — and the Team Mitch account posted images showing him at his residence.

In the wake of this weekend’s deadly mass shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio, the hashtag

“Massacre Mitch”

trended on Twitter — and some activists took their case to McConnell’s residence. Saavedra added:

“By suspending McConnell’s re-election campaign for exposing the violent rhetoric directed at McConnell, which was allowed to foment on Twitter for days, Twitter is interfering in the 2020 elections in a manner to help Democrats and hurt Republicans.” “This morning, Twitter locked our account for posting the video of real-world, violent threats made against Mitch McConnell,”

McConnell campaign manager Kevin Golden said in a statement.

“This is the problem with the speech police in America today.”

On Tuesday, McConnell’s campaign accused New York Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of encouraging threats against the senator and

“trying to dox some underage kids”

after she blasted a group of McConnell-supporting boys who took a controversial photo with a cardboard cutout of her during a recent Kentucky political event.

The situation quickly spiraled. The Daily Beast posted a tweet claiming that McConnel’s campaign had “essentially” told Ocasio-Cortez that “boys will be boys” — prompting Ocasio-Cortez, and later Newsweek, to falsely imply that McConnell’s campaign had, in fact, used that phrase.

As of late Wednesday, the Team Mitch had not deleted the offending tweet containing the video. Twitter’s policy for accounts violating its rules on certain offending content is to require the account owners to delete offending tweets in order for their access to be restored unless the conduct is so severe it warrants an indefinite suspension.

Golden continued:

“The Lexington-Herald can attack Mitch with cartoon tombstones of his opponents. But we can’t mock it. Twitter will allow the words ‘Massacre Mitch’ to trend nationally on their platform. But locks our account for posting actual threats against us. We appealed and Twitter stood by their decision, saying our account will remain locked until we delete the video.”

Golden added:

“These young men are not campaign staff, they’re high schoolers and it’s incredible that the national media has sought to once again paint a target on their backs rather than report real, and significant news in our country.”

Its most recent tweet, made late Tuesday, Team Mitch called the threats outside McConnell’s home

“serious calls to physical violence”

and said law enforcement had been notified. The episode prompted the McConnell campaign, known as

“Team Mitch,”

to slam Twitter for political bias, saying the social media platform had effectively blamed the victim. Meanwhile, observers noted, Democratic Rep. Joaquin Castro remains active on Twitter, even after he posted the names of San Antonio residents who donated to Trump.

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Kasich touted a “red flag law,” which would allow people to alert authorities if they notice a social media post that might indicate that a person is unstable.

It would then be up to a judge to decide what to do, as far as limiting that person’s ability to possess a firearm.

“It is outrageous for the politicians to just sit back and hope this goes away,”

Kasich said, pushing the media to maintain the discussion as well. Keeping the pressure on both parties is Kasich’s suggestion for making sure Congress addresses gun violence with action.

“They can all be blamed for this,”

he added.

“We need leadership at all levels of both parties.”

While Democrats have accused President Trump of inspiring race-based attacks, and have blamed Republicans for failing to pass gun control legislation, Kasich said the Democrats themselves are by no means in the clear.

Kasich acknowledged that Congress is unable to prevent all gun violence, but insisted that

“small steps can be very helpful.”

Former Ohio Governor John Kasich took members of both parties to task on Sunday for failing to take action to prevent mass shootings such as the ones that hit his home state in the city of Dayton, as well as El Paso, Texas this weekend.

“Do you know how many Democrats run for the fences whenever this comes up? They don’t want to deal with this either,”

Kasich told CNN’s Jake Tapper.

“You want to pass gun control legislation? People need to start marching,”

In the past, Democrats and media pundits have responded to shootings by calling for stricter gun laws, but Washington lawmakers have not passed legislation in recent years.

McConnell tweeted on Saturday that he and the country were “horrified” by the “senseless violence” in El Paso, where a lone gunman opened fire inside a Walmart and left at least 20 people dead and dozens more wounded. Following McConnell’s tweet, another gunman attacked a popular nightlife district in Dayton in the early hours of Sunday morning.

“Mitch McConnell should bring the Senate back into session immediately to pass HR 8, the gun safety bill that has already passed the House,”

Sanders tweeted.

“That’s a first step to addressing our serious gun violence epidemic.”

The measure, HR 8, was passed back in February with overwhelming support from the newly elected Democratic majority and some Republican support.

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, a leading candidate in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary, and Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, also demanded that McConnell call the Senate back into session and take up a vote of the resolution.

“The House passed HR8, a Bipartisan Background Checks Act, *5 months ago* and the Senate has yet to vote on it,”

Ocasio-Cortez tweeted in response to McConnell’s own tweet.

“It was one of our 1st major priorities after ending the gov shutdown. You’ve been sitting on it since February giving bogus excuses. Care to explain the people why?”

In the wake of the mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., slammed Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., for failing to call a vote on a gun reform bill that the Democratically-controlled House of Representatives passed in February.

Ocasio-Cortez called out McConnell in a tweet on Sunday for

“giving bogus excuses”

as to why the Senate hasn’t taken up the measure passed in the House that would tighten background checks for people seeking to purchase a firearm.

Ocasio-Cortez wasn’t the only lawmaker to call on McConnell to bring the resolution to a vote in the Senate.

After the New Zealand mosque shootings in March, Trump was asked whether white nationalism was

“rising threat around the world.”

The president responded:

“I don’t. I don’t really. It’s a small group of people…But it is a terrible thing.”

Castro, speaking to anchor Jonathan Karl, said that only the shooter bears “direct” responsibility. (In a statement released later Sunday, Castro echoed that comment, saying,

“These shooters are ultimately to blame for their actions. They are attempting to terrorize us but I believe that the vast majority of Americans reject this hatred.”

Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney denied earlier on “This Week” that Trump had “downplayed” the threat of white nationalism and at the White House in March, Trump remarked,

“Last month, more than 76,000 illegal migrants arrived at our border. We’re on track for a million illegal aliens to rush our borders. People hate the word ‘invasion,’ but that’s what it is. It’s an invasion of drugs and criminals and people. You have no idea who they are.” “At the same time, as our national leader, you have a role to play in either fanning the flames of division or trying to bring Americans of different backgrounds together,”

Castro told Karl.

“Most presidents have chosen to try and bring people together. This president very early on made a clear choice to divide people for his own political benefit. And these are some of the consequences that we’re seeing of that.”

Asked about the March interaction, Mulvaney said Trump has been misinterpreted.

Trump condemned the El Paso shooting early Sunday morning, calling it “hateful” and “an act of cowardice.”

“It’s no accident that, just a few weeks after he announced his 2020 reelection bid, where he was indulging and entertaining this ‘Send her back’ chant,”

Castro said.

“And he’s spoken about immigrants as being invaders. “

He’s given license for this toxic brew of white supremacy to fester more and more in this country. And we’re seeing the results of that.”

Shortly after Beto O’Rourke claimed Sunday that President Trump’s “racism” is what “leads to” violent shootings, another Democratic presidential contender, Julian Castro said

“there’s one person that’s responsible directly” for Saturday’s deadly mass shooting in El Paso, Texas — “and that’s the shooter.” “God bless the people of El Paso Texas,” “God bless the people of Dayton, Ohio.”

Trump said.

Responding directly to Mulvaney’s comments, Castro told Karl,

“You know, it’s so unfortunate that not only our president but his administration can’t rise up to the challenge of leadership in these times.” “We need to acknowledge that this is a problem.”

Buttigieg said, claiming that white nationalism has been “condoned at the highest levels” in Washington. Fox News’ Ronn Blitzer contributed to this report.

“Right now you see it being echoed by the White House and there is a measure of responsibility that you just can’t get away from,”

he said. Buttigieg cited President Trump’s comment that there were “very fine people” on both sides after a deadly attack at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va.

“This is terrorism and we have to name it as such,”

Buttigieg said, specifically calling it “white nationalist terrorism” in a conversation with host Chris Wallace on “Fox News Sunday.” Mulvaney continued:

“I don’t think it’s fair to try and lay this at the feet of the president. There are people in this country this morning thinking that President Trump was happy by this. That’s a sad, sad state of this nation. He’s angry. He’s upset. He wants it to stop. I don’t think it’s at all fair to sit here and say that he doesn’t think that white nationalism is bad for the nation. These are sick people. You cannot be a white supremacist and be normal in the head.”

In January, Trump wrote on Twitter,

“Humanitarian Crisis at our Southern Border. I just got back and it is a far worse situation than almost anyone would understand, an invasion!”

At the same time, Castro told ABC News’ “This Week,” Trump has embraced “division and bigotry and fanning the flames of hate” as a form of “political strategy.”

Separately on Sunday, Democratic presidential contender Pete Buttigieg pointed specifically to “weak gun safety” measures and white nationalism as the culprits, after the El Paso shooter was linked to anti-Mexican statements.

“I don’t believe that’s downplaying it, look at what he said,”  “Look, this is not the same as international nuclear weapons. This is a serious problem, there’s no question about it. But they are sick, sick people and the president knows that.”

Mulvaney said.

Beto O’Rourke, a former Texas congressman whose district includes El Paso, said earlier on Sunday that he believes Trump is a white nationalist and likened the president’s language to that of Nazi Germany’s

“Third Reich.”

Ryan, a congressman from Ohio, was speaking on Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures” just hours after a gunman in his home state left nine people dead and dozens more injured when he opened fire on the streets of downtown Dayton’s popular Oregon District. It was the second mass shooting in the country in less than 24 hours, following an attack by a gunman in an El Paso, Texas, Walmart that killed 20 people and left scores injured there.

“We’ve got to do something,” “I’m calling on the president and the Congress to come back in session…let’s do the work in Washington. Do the background check bill that we passed out of the House. We’ve got to ban these assault weapons.”

Ryan said.

“Let’s be very clear about what is causing this and who the president is,”

O’Rourke said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

“He is an open avowed racist and encouraging more racism in this country.” “This is ridiculous,”

he said. “

Honestly for a guy to drive 10 hours to go kill Mexicans like what happened in El Paso is sickening and I think the environment around anti-immigration, the race issues that are so polarizing today that the president throws gasoline on has got to stop.

”Ryan lumped much of the blame for the shootings on President Trump and the “environment the president has created in the United States.”

“This cannot be open for debate and you, as well as I, have a responsibility to call that out to make sure the American people know what is being done in their name,”

O’Rourke added.

“He doesn’t even pretend to respect our differences or understand we are all created equal. He is saying some people are inherently defected.”

2020 Democratic presidential primary candidate Tim Ryan on Sunday called on Congress to immediately head back to session to pass a background check bill for those seeking to buy firearms and called for a ban on the purchase of assault weapons. Ryan added:

“We’ve got to bring this country together, we’ve got to heal and it’s got to start at the top. The president needs to take a leadership role in this, he’s got to stop being so divisive, he’s got to stop tipping his hat to the white nationalists, and sometimes overtly to them, to where he’s talking to some crazy guy who’s going to drive 10 hours to shoot Mexicans.”

Ryan is one of a number of Democratic presidential hopefuls who have singled out Trump’s divisive rhetoric and tough stance on issues like immigration as part of the reason why these recent mass shootings have occurred.

Tribe subsequently clarified by saying that he is not saying that Trump

“should be impeached” for “racist incitements alone,” rather that “impeaching the president for inciting white nationalist terrorism and violence [should be] taken as seriously as impeaching him for obstructing justice.”

Democrats such as presidential candidates Pete Buttigieg and Beto O’Rourke accused Trump of encouraging racism, but Tribe went so far as to imply that the president may have committed high crimes or misdemeanors and should be removed from office for taking an active role in supporting racist violence.

Harvard Law professor Laurence Tribe has a history of passionate opposition to President Trump and calling for his impeachment, and he continued the trend Sunday by blaming Trump for a pair of shootings that took place over the weekend in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio.

The professor included a link to a video of a Trump rally, which was meant to be an example. In it, the president was discussing migrant caravans. Trump asked what to do, and someone in the crowd yelled,

“Shoot them!”

Trump shook his head, then joked,

“Only in the panhandle, you can get away with that statement.”

Immediately prior to the person’s outburst, Trump noted that

“we can’t let [border patrol agents] use weapons. Other countries do, I would never do that.”

The video had been posted as a reply to Tribe’s tweet but has since been removed.

In May, the constitutional law professor drew attention for comparing Trump to Adolf Hitler, saying,

“the physical and behavioral resemblances aren’t altogether irrelevant.”

In 2018, he focused a Constitutional Law course he was teaching on Trump and his hypothetical impeachment.

“It’s the pattern of abuses of his office as president that is accumulating, in my view, to a strong basis for formal impeachment proceedings beyond what various House committees are already conducting by way of investigating possible Articles of Impeachment,”

he said.

Tribe first promoted discussion of impeaching Trump for inciting violent acts, then took it a step further and outright accused the president of the United States of terrorism.

“How many more people have to DIE violent deaths at racist hands before impeaching the president for inciting white nationalist terrorism and violence is taken as seriously as impeaching him for obstructing justice? The real national emergency is Donald J. Trump’s terrorism,”

Tribe tweeted Sunday morning.

When asked for an explanation by Fox News, Tribe did not go into any legal analysis, but said,

“There is an alarming pattern of incitements that together warrant being taken seriously in conjunction with other, more specific, offenses.”

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, stepped off a plane and into a crowd of protesters Sunday at Los Angeles International Airport who chanted “free the children” as he waited for his luggage. The chant was a reference to detention centers at the southern border. The Texas conservative has been a staunch supporter of President Donald Trump’s border security policies. Cruz can be seen in video posted to Twitter smiling, shaking a few hands and even taking pictures with some fellow travelers as the group chanted.

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Nonetheless, the incident was used to highlight a lack of coordination between the White House and the intelligence community with Coats often being the bearer of bad news. President Trump was vocal about his disagreements with Coats, reportedly telling him behind the scenes to stay quiet about threats of Russian meddling and even calling him out publicly in certain settings.

“Can you give me an example, other than Donald Trump, where the Justice Department determined that an investigated person was not exonerated because their innocence was not conclusively determined? …You can’t find it because, I’ll tell you why, it doesn’t exist.” 

On Sunday, President Trump announced Republican Representative John Ratcliffe will take over as Director of National Intelligence (DNI). Ratcliffe has long been considered to be a Trump ally, but apparently made an impression during his interrogation of Robert Mueller. He had this to say during the hearing:

Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas., asks questions to former special counsel Robert Mueller, as he testifies before the House Judiciary Committee hearing on his report on Russian election interference, on Capitol Hill, in Washington, Wednesday, July 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The latest change at the DNI could be a sign that the president is looking to downsize the department altogether in order to concentrate on information sharing efforts. Coats is expected to leave the department on Thursday, August 15th with the president saying an active director will be named in the near future.

There’s another shake-up in the Trump administration, with the latest move likely having a trickle-effect throughout the rest of the government.
The Texas congressman was already a rising star in the Republican Party after winning his election with more than 70-percent of the vote in the 2018 midterms. Ratcliffe was facing off against other high profile officials for the job, including chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Joseph Dunford. He also challenged Fred Fleitz, the former Chief of Staff for National Security Adviser John Bolton.

Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas., asks questions to former special counsel Robert Mueller, as he testifies before the House Judiciary Committee hearing on his report on Russian election interference, on Capitol Hill, in Washington, Wednesday, July 24, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Ratcliffe will now be elevated to a post where the current official, Dan Coats, has often been at odds with the president and his administration. Perhaps the most memorable event during his tenure was his response after learning President Trump invited Russian President Vladimir Putin to the White House. When asked about the invitation he laughed and acted as if it were a joke. Coats later said he meant no disrespect to the White House and admitted the exchange was somewhat awkward.

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