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Lauryn Overhultz | Columnist

Julia Roberts took a firm stance against the actions of those involved in the college admissions scandal.

The “Pretty Woman” actress weighed in on the scandal while promoting her new drama “Ben Is Back” in the U.K.

“That to me is so sad, because I feel, [as] an outsider, that it says a little bit ‘I don’t have enough faith in you,” Roberts told ITV in a report published Monday by Entertainment Tonight.

Roberts and her husband have three kids together, 14-year old twins and an 11-year old son. They try to keep the experience relatively normal for their kids, Roberts said.

“My husband and I are very aligned on that front, I think that we live a very normal experience with our children. Obviously we have advantages that we didn’t have as children,” Roberts told ITV. “But I think that’s the unique part of it, coming from the childhood I have. You do need to know how to make your bed and do your laundry and make one meal. These are important life skills.”

“They have to run their own race,” she continued. “They have to have their own experience.” (RELATED: Lori Loughlin’s Daughter Loses Sephora Collaboration Amid College Admissions Scandal)

Actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were both charged in the massive admissions scandal for allegedly paying for their children to gain admission to certain colleges. Loughlin allegedly paid $500,000 in bribes so her daughters could secure admissions to the University of Southern California. Huffman reportedly paid $15,000 to have someone take the SAT test for her daughter.

Source: The Daily Caller

FILE PHOTO: The Supreme Court stands before decisions are released for the term in Washington
FILE PHOTO: The Supreme Court is seen in Washington, U.S., May 14, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

March 19, 2019

By Lawrence Hurley

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Supreme Court on Tuesday endorsed U.S. government authority to detain immigrants awaiting deportation anytime – potentially even years – after they have completed prison terms for criminal convictions, handing President Donald Trump a victory as he pursues hardline immigration policies.

The court ruled 5-4, with its conservative justices in the majority and its liberal justices dissenting, that federal authorities could pick up such immigrants and place them into indefinite detention at any time, not just immediately after they finish their prison sentences.

The ruling, authored by conservative Justice Samuel Alito, leaves open the possibility of individual immigrants challenging the federal law involved in the case on constitutional grounds if they are detained long after they have completed their sentences.

In dissent, liberal Justice Stephen Breyer questioned whether the U.S. Congress when it wrote the law “meant to allow the government to apprehend persons years after their release from prison and hold them indefinitely without a bail hearing.”

The Trump administration had appealed a lower court ruling in the case that favored immigrants, a decision it said would undermine the government’s ability to deport immigrants who have committed crimes. Trump has backed limits on legal and illegal immigrants since taking office in January 2017.

The plaintiffs included two legal U.S. residents involved in separate lawsuits filed in 2013, a Cambodian immigrant named Mony Preap convicted of marijuana possession and a Palestinian immigrant named Bassam Yusuf Khoury convicted of attempting to manufacture a controlled substance.

Under federal immigration law, immigrants convicted of certain offenses are subject to mandatory detention during their deportation process. They can be held indefinitely without a bond hearing after completing their sentences.

(Reporting by Lawrence Hurley; Editing by Will Dunham)

Source: OANN

Honduran migrant Ariel, 19, who is waiting for his court hearing for asylum seekers returned to Mexico to wait out their legal proceedings under a new policy change by the U.S. government, is pictured after an interview with Reuters in Tijuana
Honduran migrant Ariel, 19, who is waiting for his court hearing for asylum seekers returned to Mexico to wait out their legal proceedings under a new policy change by the U.S. government, is pictured after an interview with Reuters in Tijuana, Mexico March 18, 2019. Picture taken March 18, 2019. REUTERS/Jorge Duenes

March 19, 2019

By Lizbeth Diaz and Mica Rosenberg

TIJUANA/NEW YORK (Reuters) – A group of asylum seekers sent back to Mexico was set to cross the border on Tuesday for their first hearings in U.S. immigration court in an early test of a controversial new policy from the Trump administration.

The U.S. program, known as the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), turns people seeking protection in the United States around to wait out their U.S. court proceedings in Mexican border towns. Some 240 people – including families – have been returned since late January, according to U.S. officials.

Court officials in San Diego referred questions about the number of hearings being held on Tuesday to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which did not respond to a request for comment. But attorneys representing a handful of clients were preparing to appear in court.

Migrants like 19-year-old Ariel, who said he left Honduras because of gang death threats against himself and his family, were preparing to line up at the San Ysidro port of entry first thing Tuesday morning.

Ariel, who asked to use only his middle name because of fears of reprisals in his home country, was among the first group of asylum-seeking migrants sent back to Mexico on Jan. 30 and given a notice to appear in U.S. court in San Diego.

“God willing everything will move ahead and I will be able to prove that if I am sent back to Honduras, I’ll be killed,” Ariel said.

While awaiting his U.S. hearing, Ariel said he was unable to get a legal work permit in Mexico but found a job as a restaurant busboy in Tijuana, which does not pay him enough to move out of a shelter.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and other advocacy groups are suing in federal court to halt the MPP program, which is part of a series of measures the administration of President Donald Trump has taken to try to curb the flow of mostly Central American migrants trying to enter the United States.

The Trump administration says most asylum claims, especially for Central Americans, are ultimately rejected, but because of crushing immigration court backlogs people are often released pending resolution of their cases and live in the United States for years. The government has said the new program is aimed at ending “the exploitation of our generous immigration laws.”

Critics of the program say it violates U.S. law and international norms since migrants are sent back to often dangerous towns in Mexico in precarious living situations where it is difficult to get notice about changes to U.S. court dates and to find legal help.

Immigration advocates are closely watching how the proceedings will be carried out this week, especially after scheduling glitches created confusion around three hearings last week, according to a report in the San Diego Union Tribune.

The Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), which runs U.S. immigration courts under the Department of Justice, said only that it uses its regular court scheduling system for the MPP hearings and did not respond to a question about the reported scheduling problems.

Gregory Chen, director of government relations at the American Immigration Lawyers Association, said there are real concerns about the difficulties of carrying out this major shift in U.S. immigration policy.

“The government did not have its shoes tied when they introduced this program,” he said.

(Reporting by Lizbeth Diaz in Tijuana and Mica Rosenberg in New York; Editing by Bill Trott)

Source: OANN

David Hookstead | Reporter

NFL teams apparently believe Josh Rosen will be shipped out of Arizona.

The prevailing wisdom seems to be that quarterback Kyler Murray is a lock to go to the Arizona Cardinals first overall. Given what I’ve seen in the past few weeks and what I predicted a month ago, I would have to say that’s also what I believe will happen.

Turns out, teams are the league feel the same way because they’re preparing for Josh Rosen to get traded. (RELATED: Kyler Murray Measures In At Over 5’10” At The Combine)

Albert Breer wrote the following Monday for Sports Illustrated:

Teams are still in the dark on the availability of Cardinals QB Josh Rosen. But I’m told that’s not stopping them from getting their ducks in a row, with guys who’ve worked with Rosen over the last few years fielding phone calls and having discussions with intrigued teams gathering background. If you want to see the real-life application of the perception that Kyler Murray is Arizona-bound, there you have it.

Let’s be honest with ourselves on this one. Unless something major changes, Kyler Murray is going to be wearing red and white for the Cardinals’ Week 1 of the 2019 season.

That means Josh Rosen will be moved. Where could he end up? The Giants seem like a likely destination, especially now that the franchise is reportedly not interested in Dwayne Haskins.

Rosen has the potential to be a franchise quarterback. You’re kidding yourself if you think he won’t be scooped up in a heartbeat.

As for the Cardinals, it sounds like they’re all in on putting Kliff Kingsbury and Murray together. I can’t wait.

The two of them together should be epic. That fast-paced offense they’re going to run is going to be so much fun to watch.

Best of luck to Rosen wherever he ends up, but there’s a really good chance it’s about to be the Kyler Murray show in Arizona.

Source: The Daily Caller

A Wall St. street sign is seen near the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York
FILE PHOTO: A Wall St. street sign is seen near the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York City, U.S., March 7, 2019. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

March 19, 2019

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Investors remained bullish on longer-dated U.S. Treasuries for a sixth consecutive week on worries about a slowing economy and expectations inflation will stay muted despite a tight domestic labor market, a J.P. Morgan survey showed on Tuesday.

The margin of investors who said they were “long,” or holding more Treasuries than their portfolio benchmarks, over those who said they were “short,” or holding fewer Treasuries than their benchmarks, increased to nine percentage points from 7 points the prior week, according to the survey.

Three weeks ago, the gap between longs and shorts rose to 11 percentage points, the highest since September 2016.

The survey results come the same day Fed policymakers begin a two-day meeting at which they are expected to leave interest rates unchanged.Twenty-eight percent of the investors surveyed said on Monday for a third straight week they were long on U.S. government bonds, the J.P. Morgan survey showed.

The share of investors who said they were short Treasuries fell to 19 percent from 21 percent a week ago.

The percentage of investors who said they were “neutral,” or holding Treasuries equal to their portfolio benchmarks, edged up to 53 percent from 51 percent the week before, J.P. Morgan said.

Positions among active clients, which include market makers and hedge funds, showed no bearish bets on longer-dated Treasuries. Active net longs rose to 30 percent, the highest since May 2018, while the share of these clients who said they were neutral increased to 70 percent from 60 percent.

In early Tuesday trading, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury was 2.6267 percent, up from 2.6050 percent a week ago.

(GRAPHIC: Investors positions in longer-dated U.S. Treasuries – https://tmsnrt.rs/2V9OjHR)

(Reporting by Richard Leong; Editing by Steve Orlofsky)

Source: OANN

Michael Bastasch | Energy Editor

  • Activists are blaming global warming for historic flooding in the Midwest, however, the science behind their claim is weak and not in line with the latest National Climate Assessment.
  • Hundreds of homes are inundated with water and at least three people have been killed in floods.
  • Thousands of people across four states were forced to evacuate because river flooding breached nearly 200 miles of levees.

Some environmentalists and scientists are blaming global warming for the historic flooding across the Midwest, adding to the long list of disasters eager activists link to climate change.

But is the scientific connection between historic Midwest floods and global warming very strong? No, it’s not.

A “bomb cyclone” led to sudden, devastating floods across the Midwest and Great Plains that left at least three people dead, according to reports. Officials say it’s the worst flooding in 50 years.

While most in the media largely stayed away from connecting Midwest flooding to climate change, environmentalists were quick to make the connection, claiming the science was on their side.

Bill McKibben, a prominent environmentalist who made headlines protesting the Keystone XL oil pipeline, proclaimed “[s]cientists confirm climate change” was at work in the historic Midwest flooding.

An aerial view of the flooding at the Camp Ashland in Nebraska

Flooded Camp Ashland, Army National Guard facility, is seen in this aerial photo taken in Ashland, Nebraska, U.S., March 17, 2019. Picture taken March 17, 2019. Courtesy Herschel Talley/Nebraska National Guard/Handout via REUTERS.

The article McKibben linked to, however, only mentions a “changing climate” once, but does discuss the myriad of other, likely more important factors, that contributed to the massive flooding, like rainfall piling up over frozen ground. (RELATED: DC Opens Door To Private Investors Financing Its Climate Change Case Against Exxon, Lawyer Says)

The liberal blog ThinkProgress claimed Midwest floods were a “terrifying preview of climate impacts to come,” though the article relied heavily on comment from environmental activists.

“This level of flooding is becoming the new normal,” John Hickey, Sierra Club’s Missouri chapter director, told ThinkProgress.

Other environmental activists attacked major media outlets, like The New York Times and The Washington Post, for not linking Midwest flooding to global warming.

Environmental policy experts were quick to point out the lack of science behind such claims.

An aerial view of Spencer Dam after a storm triggered historic flooding, near Bristow, Nebraska

An aerial view of Spencer Dam after a storm triggered historic flooding, near Bristow, Nebraska, U.S. March 16, 2019. Office of Governor Pete Ricketts/Handout via REUTERS.

The 2018 National Climate Assessment (NCA) found that “formal attribution approaches have not established a significant connection of increased riverine flooding to human-induced climate change.”

Likewise, the NCA noted that “a variety of other compounding factors, including local land use, land-cover changes, and water management also play important roles.”

Land-cover was an extremely important factor in the Midwest floods. Heavy rain fell onto snow-covered, frozen ground. Rain and snowmelt ran off into already ice-covered rivers, which rose and sent massive chunks of ice downstream, breaking infrastructure and damming up the river.

More than 70 cities across Nebraska declared emergencies amid historic floods. Thousands of people across four states were forced to evacuate because river flooding breached nearly 200 miles of levees, CBS News reported.

The Mississippi and Missouri rivers also saw widespread flooding. Residents in western Illinois saw the worst floods in 50 years, according to The Chicago Tribune. Many homes in Holt County, Missouri were sitting in up to 7 feet of water from river flooding, The Associated Press reported.

Flooded apartments are seen over Elkhorn River after a storm triggered historic flooding in Nebraska

Flooded apartments are seen over Elkhorn River after a storm triggered historic flooding in Nebraska, U.S. March 16, 2019. Office of Governor Pete Ricketts/Handout via REUTERS.

Oddly enough, the Nebraska-based Omaha World-Herald got comments from two scientists who gave rather broad statements on the connection between global warming and extreme rainfall.

Former NASA climate scientist James Hansen said “the strongest storms are getting stronger with global warming” because warmer air has more moisture. Penn State University climate scientist Michael Mann, creator of the controversial “hockey stick graph,” told the World-Herald that some studies show factors behind “bomb cyclones” are increasing due to climate change.

“There is evidence now in modeling studies that climate change is increasing these factors, supporting the development of more intense bomb cyclones and Nor’easters, packing tropical storm-scale winds and dumping huge amounts of precipitation (often in the form of huge snowfalls),” Mann said.

However, atmospheric scientist Ryan Maue shot back, saying that Hansen and Mann were giving generalized explanations of modeled climate impacts instead of gathering actual data on the flood event.

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Source: The Daily Caller

A general view shows destruction after Cyclone Idai in Beira
A general view shows destruction after Cyclone Idai in Beira, Mozambique, March 16-17, 2019 in this still image taken from a social media video on March 19, 2019. Care International/Josh Estey via REUTERS

March 19, 2019

MAPUTO/HARARE (Reuters) – Cyclone winds and floods that swept across southeastern Africa affected more than 2.6 million people and could rank as one of the worst weather-related disaster recorded in the southern hemisphere, U.N. officials said on Tuesday.

Rescue crews are still struggling to reach victims five days after Cyclone Idai raced in at speeds of up to 170 kph (105 mph) from the Indian Ocean into Mozambique, then its inland neighbors Zimbabwe and Malawi.

Aid groups said many survivors were trapped in remote areas, surrounded by wrecked roads, flattened buildings and submerged villages.

“There’s a sense from people on the ground that the world still really hasn’t caught on to how severe this disaster is,” Matthew Cochrane, spokesman for International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, told a U.N. briefing in Geneva.

“The full horror, the full impact is only going to emerge over coming days,” he added.

The official death count in Mozambique stands at 84 – but its president Filipe Nyusi said on Monday he had flown over some of the worst-hit zones, seen bodies floating in rivers and now estimated more than 1,000 people may have died there.

The cyclone hit land near Mozambique’s port of Beira on Thursday and moved inland throughout the weekend, leaving heavy rains in its wake on Tuesday.

Studies of satellite images suggested 1.7 million people were in the path of the cyclone in Mozambique and another 920,000 affected in Malawi, Herve Verhoosel, senior spokesman at the U.N World Food Programme said. It gave no figures for Zimbabwe.

WORST FEARS

Several rivers had broken their banks, or were about to, leaving a huge area covered by the waters, and only accessible by air and water, Lola Castro, WFP regional director for Southern Africa, told the U.N. briefing by phone from Johannesburg.

Heavy rains preceded the cyclone, compounding the problems, said Clare Nullis of the U.N. World Meteorological Organization said .

“It the worst fears are realized … then we can say that it is one of the worst weather-related disasters, tropical-cyclone-related disasters in the southern hemisphere.” Droughts are classed as climate-related not weather-related.

In Beira, a low-lying coastal city of 500,000 people, Nullis said the water had nowhere to drain. “This is not going to go away quickly,” she said.

Beira is also home to Mozambique’s second largest port, which serves as a gateway to landlocked countries in the region.

The control room of a pipeline that runs from Beira to Zimbabwe and supplies the majority of that country’s fuel had been damaged, Zimbabwe’s Energy Minister Jorum Gumbo told state-owned Herald newspaper on Tuesday.

“We, however, have enough stocks in the country and I am told the repairs at Beira may take a week,” he was quoted as saying.

(Reporting Manuel Mucari in Maputo and Macdonald Dzirutwe in Harare; Additional reporting by Tom Miles in Geneva and Mfuneko Toyana and Emma Rumney in Johannesburg; Editing by Catherine Evans and Andrew Heavens)

Source: OANN

David Hookstead | Reporter

Philadelphia Phillies player Carlos Santana had an incredible reaction to his teammates playing video games.

During a poor part of last season for the Phillies, players were focused on video games during matchups taking place out on the field. How did Santana respond to that? He just smashed the TV with a baseball bat. (RELATED: Bryce Harper Signs With The Phillies)

ESPN reported the following on the situation:

When the Philadelphia Phillies lost their ninth consecutive game toward the end of last September, veteran first baseman Carlos Santana felt like he needed to send a message to his teammates who he said spent portions of the game against the Atlanta Braves playing video games in the clubhouse. Santana grabbed a bat, retreated to the room at Citizens Bank Park where the gaming took place and smashed the TV to ensure there would be no more Fortnite the final two days of the season.

“I see a couple players — I don’t want to say names — they play video games during the game,” Santana told ESPN. “We come and lose too many games, and I feel like they weren’t worried about it. Weren’t respecting their teammates or coaches or the staff or the [front] office. It’s not my personality. But I’m angry because I want to make it good.”

This is awesome. It’s almost straight out of the movie “Moneyball,” when players dance to music after losing.

If you’re a pro athlete and you’re playing video games during actual games, then you should be suspended immediately. It should be a zero-tolerance policy.

You’re getting paid a ton of money to win. If you can’t delay picking up a controller for the four or five hours you’re committed to playing, then you have no business in the sport. It’s that simple.

I honestly wouldn’t have been surprised if this ended in a fistfight. Imagine giving everything you have, and then finding out some players are busy with Fortnite. (RELATED: Philadelphia Phillies Sell $4 Million Worth Of Tickets After Signing Bryce Harper)

Smashing a TV seems like a very calm and measured response.

If you’re dumb enough to play video games during a matchup, then you’re dumb enough to get your TV smashed. Play stupid games and I promise you that you’ll win stupid prizes.

Major shoutout to Santana for showing the Phillies what leadership looks like.

Source: The Daily Caller

David Krayden | Ottawa Bureau Chief

Democratic New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker may want to legalize marijuana, but he doesn’t think presidential candidates should be “bragging about their pot use.”

Booker was being interviewed Monday night on MSNBC’s “Hardball” on a variety of issues when he suggested it wasn’t right for “senators” or officials seeking higher office to laugh about their cannabis experiences when many pot users have criminal records for smoking marijuana.

Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) speaks at his “Conversation with Cory” campaign event at the Nevada Partners Event Center on February 24, 2019 in North Las Vegas, Nevada. Booker is campaigning for the 2020 Democratic nomination for president. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

“We have presidential candidates — senators — bragging about their pot use while there are kids who can’t get a job because they have a nonviolent offense,” Booker said. (RELATED: Senator Wants To Legalize Weed Nationally)

The presidential candidates that Booker cited are most likely Democratic California Sen. Kamala Harris and Independent Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who both indicated that they have experimented with marijuana.

Harris told “The Breakfast Club” in early February that she smoked pot during her university days.

“Look, I joke about it, half-joking, half of my family is from Jamaica,” Harris said, “Are you kidding me? And I did inhale.”

US Senators Cory Booker (L) and Kamala Harris (R) chat on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 27, 2018. (Photo SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

US Senators Cory Booker (L) and Kamala Harris (R) chat on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, Sept. 27, 2018. (Photo SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

She even remembered listening to Snoop Dog while toking, even though that memory caused a stir on social media because the rapper didn’t come along until Harris had already graduated from Howard University in 1989.

As for Sanders, his marijuana “recollection” on “The Breakfast Club” didn’t include any music from The Bryds or The Beatles.

“I nearly coughed my brains out, so it’s not my cup of tea,” he said.

Despite the experience apparently being a bummer, Sanders reiterated his support for legalizing recreational cannabis during the interview. (RELATED: The Key To Winning In 2020 Will Be Properly Explaining Socialism, Says Bernie Sanders)

Last weekend, during a town hall meeting in Davenport, Iowa, Booker also made a statement suggesting that smoking pot is no laughing matter while “poor people and — way disproportionately — people of color” have rap sheets for smoking pot.

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Source: The Daily Caller

Islamist tyrant Recep Tayyip Erdogan has caused fury by telling New Zealanders they will be sent back in “coffins” like their forefathers in WW1 if they misbehave while visiting Turkey for Anzac day in April.

“If you come in peace, fine, if not, you will be sent back in COFFINS the way your forefathers were dispatched after the Gallipoli Battle of WW1,” said the Turkish president.

Erdogan aimed his comments at New Zealanders despite the fact that the mosque gunman who killed 50 people was Australian, another slap in the face to a country already suffering immense grief.

The Islamist president is already under fire for showing footage of the Christchurch terror attack to his supporters at political rallies, a disgraceful exploitation of the tragedy.

According to New Zealand’s foreign minister Winston Peters, the stunt “imperils the future and safety of the New Zealand people and our people abroad and it’s totally unfair.”

“Is it worth showing this bloody massacre in order to gain a few more votes?” asked Turkish opposition spokesman Faik Oztrak.

Peters has now vowed to set the record straight, asserting, “He knows the separation of us and Australia – some countries don’t think we’re different but we are.”

Erdogan is notorious for siding with extremist Islamists, having previously complained about Austria shutting down extremist mosques by suggesting violent reprisals.

“They say they’re going to kick our religious men out of Austria. Do you think we will not react if you do such a thing?” he said.

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Paul Joseph Watson is the editor at large of Infowars.com and Prison Planet.com.

Source: InfoWars


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