vote

The right-wing parties in the European Union elections won in the U.K., France, and Italy as the nationalists who intend to chip away at E.U. power upped their share, The New York Times reported.

About one-quarter of the 751-seat EU will be controlled by populists, up from 20% a year ago, according to the report.

Among the most notable of the right-wing victories:

  • The National Rally party of Marine Le Pen in France, defeating Emmanuel Macron’s En Marche 24-22.5%, according to reports: “A vote for France, and for the people,” Le Pen said, per the Times.
  • Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party, which wants the U.K. to leave the EU without a deal, was in first place, with 32% of the vote, according to Bloomberg.
  • Matteo Salvini, an anti-immigrant populist, saw his League come in first at 30%, per exit polls, AP reported.

The story in Germany was a bit different as the Greens did well, finishing second (20.5% of the vote) to Chancellor Angela Merkel’s center-right Union bloc (28.9%), according to CNBC.

Source: NewsMax Politics

FILE PHOTO: U.S. dollar and Euro notes are seen in this picture illustration
FILE PHOTO: U.S. dollar and Euro notes are seen in this November 7, 2016 picture illustration. Picture taken November 7. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration

May 27, 2019

By Hideyuki Sano

TOKYO (Reuters) – The euro barely budged in early Monday trade after pro-European Union parties held on to two-thirds of seats in the EU parliament elections, limiting gains in nationalist opponents.

The common currency was little changed at $1.1210 in Asian trade and off a two-year low of $1.11055 touched on Thursday, as the markets studied the outcome of the vote.

While center-right and center-left blocs are losing their shared majority, surges in the Greens and liberals meant parties committed to strengthening the union held on to two-thirds of seats, official projections showed.

The results dented the hopes of anti-immigration, anti-Brussels National Rally led by Marine Le Pen, Italian Deputy Prime Minister Matteo Salvini and others who have been opposing attempts to forge closer EU integration.

“The focus is on how each government will react and how the Brexit negotiations will play out after this elections. So far we’ve seen limited market reaction as far-right, populist parties didn’t do as well as some had feared,” said Shin Kadota, senior FX and rates strategist at Barclays.

Trading was seen subdued on Monday due to market holidays in London and New York.

The dollar was little changed against other currencies.

The U.S. currency traded at 109.35 yen, not far from a three-month low of 109.02 touched two weeks ago, hit amid worries about escalating tensions between Washington and Beijing over trade and technology.

The dollar has been also capped against the yen as U.S. President Donald Trump is seen putting pressure on Japan to take measures to reduce its trade surplus with the United States.

Trump, who arrived in Tokyo on Saturday, tweeted on Sunday that much of the trade negotiation with Japan will wait until after the country’s election in July.

The British pound was steady at $1.2725, having regained some ground after Prime Minister Theresa May set out a departure date, bouncing back from a 4-1/2-month low of $1.2605 set on Thursday.

But the prospect of a “no deal” Brexit was fast becoming the central battle of the race among contenders to succeed May, with four of eight leadership hopefuls having said Britain must leave the EU on Oct. 31 even if this means a no-deal Brexit.

(Editing by Shri Navaratnam)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: A man looks at an electronic board showing the Nikkei stock index outside a brokerage in Tokyo
FILE PHOTO: A man looks at an electronic board showing the Nikkei stock index outside a brokerage in Tokyo, Japan, January 7, 2019. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

May 27, 2019

By Shinichi Saoshiro

TOKYO (Reuters) – Asia stocks edged up early on Monday, and the euro was confined to a narrow range after the weekend’s European Parliament elections highlighted the deepening political fragmentation of the 28-country bloc.

The euro was a shade higher at $1.1211, holding within a tight $1.2272-$1.2754 range in what was a limited reaction to so far the exit polls.

Estimates after the European Parliament polls closed on Sunday showed that the two largest centrist groups – the European Peoples’ Party (EPP) to the right and the Socialists & Democrats (S&D) on the left – will no longer hold a majority in the new 751-seat chamber.

Analysts said the single currency’s muted reaction to the preliminary vote outcome came as the results showed populist and far-right parties in some countries were unlikely to have gathered as much support as anticipated. .

A centrist, pro-EU coalition would still be possible in the new chamber that will sit for the first time on July 2nd. But it would be more difficult to piece together among more numerous partners, according to the European Parliament’s estimates.

The longer-term impact of the election, therefore, remained unclear, analysts say.

“It’s difficult to foresee what will happen to Brexit, the political situation in Italy and elections in Greece just by looking at the vote count,” said Shin Kadota, senior strategist at Barclays in Tokyo.

“We may not see an immediate market reaction, as the election outcome will have to seep in first before beginning to have a political impact on the various countries.”

The pound was 0.1% higher at $1.2727. Sterling had bounced back from a near five-month trough of $1.2605 after British Prime Minister Theresa May said she would quit early next month. [GBP/]

The dollar index against a basket of six major currencies inched down 0.05% to 97.563.

In equities, MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan added 0.1%.

Gains were limited by persistent concerns that the China-U.S. trade conflict was fast turning into a technology cold war between the world’s two largest economies.

Japan’s Nikkei climbed 0.2%.

Wall Street’s major indexes edged higher on Friday in a rebound from the previous session’s losses after comments from U.S. President Donald Trump regarding trade relations with China gave the wary markets a bit of a respite. [.N]

U.S. crude futures crawled up 0.38% to $58.85 per barrel, trimming some of the deep losses suffered last week when trade tensions clouded the global demand outlook for the commodity.

Brent crude rose 0.79% to %69.24 per barrel.

(Editing by Shri Navaratnam)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: Informal meeting of EU leaders in Sibiu
FILE PHOTO: Ireland’s Prime Minister (Taoiseach) and Defence Minister Leo Varadkar arrives for the informal meeting of European Union leaders in Sibiu, Romania, May 9, 2019. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

May 26, 2019

DUBLIN (Reuters) – Ireland’s two largest parties held their own in local elections on Sunday in a bad day for left-wing Sinn Fein, whose political ascent in the republic suffered its first major setback.

With more than three quarters of the 949 seats announced, Prime Minister Leo Varadkar’s Fine Gael party rose to 24.9% from 24% five years ago. It still trailed fellow centre-right party Fianna Fail, whose share rose to 26.9% from 25.5%.

Sinn Fein – the former political wing of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) who established themselves as the third largest party in Ireland two decades after their members were banned from speaking on Irish media – fell to 9.6% from 15.2%.

The result was a setback for Mary Lou McDonald who succeeded Gerry Adams a year ago amid hopes a younger leader would broaden the Irish nationalist party’s appeal and advance its ambition of governing on both sides of the Irish border.

The biggest gainers were the Green Party, which, after topping polls by significant margins in some urban areas, was set for an almost four-fold increase to 5.7%. Such a showing could leave them as kingmakers if repeated at a parliamentary poll.

A similarly fragmented result in 2016 parliament elections resulted in Fine Gael leading a minority government with a handful of independent lawmakers and the backing of Fianna Fail from the opposition benches.

With that Fine Gael-Fianna Fail agreement set to run out early next year, Varadkar said he could not rule out a national election in the coming months although senior ministers have cautioned that Brexit will continue to weigh on any decision to go to the polls this year.

(Reporting by Padraic Halpin; Editing by Andrew Heavens)

Source: OANN

The euroskeptic Brexit Party headed by former UKIP leader Nigel Farage is looking at a solid victory in the European elections, early exit polls show, placing it at about 30 percent, over 20 percent ahead of the Conservatives.

The Brexit Party appears to have scored big in the UK’s portion of the European Parliament elections, with early results and projections on Sunday night showing it ahead of the rest of the field.

Farage began celebrating as the first exit polls started coming in. “It looks like it’s going to be a big win for the Brexit Party,” he told reporters.

With about 55 percent of the vote in, Brexit has some 31 percent, followed by pro-EU Liberal Democrats with 20, Labour with 14 and the Greens with 12. The Conservatives are taking a massive hit and are projected to win only about nine percent.

The Brexit Party’s triumph is not coming out of the blue. Ahead of the vote, numerous polls predicted that Farage’s new political venture would pass its first election test with flying colors with an estimated double-digit lead over the Conservative Party, which is days away from losing their leader on June 7, when Theresa May’s resignation comes into force.

The three-day EU-wide elections has attracted the largest turnout in two decades, since 1994, when over 56 percent of the Europeans cast their ballots. In the UK, it has been overshadowed by a leadership struggle in the Conservative Party after Theresa May’s Friday announcement that she would step down as the party’s leader.

The Tories saw their voter support sliding due to the Brexit deal debacle that precipitated the PM’s long-awaited bow-out.

Registered just three months before the election, on February 5th, the Brexit Party quickly gained momentum on the back of the growing frustration with May and the Tories’ failure to deliver the long-awaited split with the EU.

While the Brexit Party is a novice in the European politics, it has 14 MEPs in the outgoing European Parliament, all defectors from the UK Independence Party (UKIP), including Farage himself. According to BBC projections, Farage’s new project will fare better than UKIP, his former one, which grabbed 24 seats and 27 percent of the popular vote in 2014.

While commanding massive popular support, the Brexit firebrand, who has always been a polarizing figure, has drawn strong criticism from opponents and recently became a victim of a ‘milkshaking’ trend. Farage survived a dousing attack on Monday, when a man threw a milkshake at him, in Newcastle, saying he was protesting his “bile and racism.”


The influence of Brexit is showing as exit polls indicate populist candidates are expected to gain power across the EU. Dan Lyman joins Owen to break down the future of the failing EU.

Source: InfoWars

The euroskeptic Brexit Party headed by former UKIP leader Nigel Farage is looking at a solid victory in the European elections, early exit polls show, placing it at about 30 percent, over 20 percent ahead of the Conservatives.

The Brexit Party appears to have scored big in the UK’s portion of the European Parliament elections, with early results and projections on Sunday night showing it ahead of the rest of the field.

Farage began celebrating as the first exit polls started coming in. “It looks like it’s going to be a big win for the Brexit Party,” he told reporters.

With about 55 percent of the vote in, Brexit has some 31 percent, followed by pro-EU Liberal Democrats with 20, Labour with 14 and the Greens with 12. The Conservatives are taking a massive hit and are projected to win only about nine percent.

The Brexit Party’s triumph is not coming out of the blue. Ahead of the vote, numerous polls predicted that Farage’s new political venture would pass its first election test with flying colors with an estimated double-digit lead over the Conservative Party, which is days away from losing their leader on June 7, when Theresa May’s resignation comes into force.

The three-day EU-wide elections has attracted the largest turnout in two decades, since 1994, when over 56 percent of the Europeans cast their ballots. In the UK, it has been overshadowed by a leadership struggle in the Conservative Party after Theresa May’s Friday announcement that she would step down as the party’s leader.

The Tories saw their voter support sliding due to the Brexit deal debacle that precipitated the PM’s long-awaited bow-out.

Registered just three months before the election, on February 5th, the Brexit Party quickly gained momentum on the back of the growing frustration with May and the Tories’ failure to deliver the long-awaited split with the EU.

While the Brexit Party is a novice in the European politics, it has 14 MEPs in the outgoing European Parliament, all defectors from the UK Independence Party (UKIP), including Farage himself. According to BBC projections, Farage’s new project will fare better than UKIP, his former one, which grabbed 24 seats and 27 percent of the popular vote in 2014.

While commanding massive popular support, the Brexit firebrand, who has always been a polarizing figure, has drawn strong criticism from opponents and recently became a victim of a ‘milkshaking’ trend. Farage survived a dousing attack on Monday, when a man threw a milkshake at him, in Newcastle, saying he was protesting his “bile and racism.”


The influence of Brexit is showing as exit polls indicate populist candidates are expected to gain power across the EU. Dan Lyman joins Owen to break down the future of the failing EU.

Source: InfoWars

A woman exits the polling booth before casting her vote for the European and local elections at a polling station in Athens
A woman exits the polling booth before casting her vote for the European and local elections at a polling station in Athens, Greece, May 26, 2019. REUTERS/Constantina Peppa

May 26, 2019

By Renee Maltezou and Michele Kambas

ATHENS (Reuters) – Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras called snap national elections after suffering a heavy defeat by the opposition conservatives in European Parliament elections on Sunday.

With an unexpectedly severe pounding at the ballot box for his leftist Syriza party, Tsipras decided not to push through to a full term which expires in October.

“I will request immediate declaration of national elections from the President of the Republic,” Tsipras said in a speech. A party source said the earliest a vote could take place would be June 30, to allow for preparations.

Results for the European Parliament vote showed Syriza trailing the opposition New Democracy party by about nine points.

Syriza stormed the Greek political scene on an anti-austerity platform six years ago, then suffered a backlash after having to impose cut-backs as part of a third bailout in 2015. More damagingly, there was a deeply unpopular agreement that resolved a long-running name dispute with North Macedonia.

New Democracy leader Kyriakos Mitsotakis demanded Tsipras resign, saying he had lost the popular mandate.

“The Prime Minister must assume his responsibilities. For the good of the country he must resign and the country should hold national elections, the soonest possible,” Mitsotakis said.

Once a leftist firebrand, Tsipras, 44, mellowed after sweeping to power and telling the country’s creditors to back off in 2015.

But he was forced into a painful new bailout months later, when faced with a choice of that or being turfed out of the euro zone and into the financial wilderness. The capitulation went down badly with many voters.

Greece emerged from close financial supervision by its lenders in August 2018. The government this month introduced tax cuts and pension payouts, going some way toward unwinding some of the austerity measures.

The handouts may have averted a steeper defeat in the European election, political analyst Thanos Veremis said.

Tsipras’ decision to broker a deal ending a name dispute with North Macedonia earned kudos from his European partners, but proved deeply unpopular with many Greeks.

His coalition partner, Panos Kammenos, pulled out of the government in January, triggering a confidence vote in parliament that Tsipras nonetheless won comfortably.

For most, use of the Macedonia name is an appropriation of Greek heritage by the country’s small neighbor. Regardless, Tsipras signed the name-change deal in June, on the banks of the Prespes Lake bordering Albania, Greece and North Macedonia.

“Syriza committed suicide in Prespes,” Kammenos, his former coalition partner, tweeted on Sunday evening.

(Additional reporting by Lefteris Papadimas, Writing by Michele Kambas; Editing by David Holmes and Andrew Heavens)

Source: OANN

Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz talks to the media after casting his vote during European Parliament Elections in Vienna
Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz talks to the media after casting his vote during European Parliament Elections in Vienna, Austria May 26, 2019. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger

May 26, 2019

VIENNA (Reuters) – Austria’s opposition Social Democrats will submit a parliamentary motion of no-confidence on Monday against Chancellor Sebastian Kurz and his government, the party’s leader Pamela Rendi-Wagner told broadcaster ORF on Sunday.

Rendi-Wagner was speaking after a meeting of her party’s leadership, which decided in favor of the motion and would recommend that its lawmakers express no confidence in the government, Rendi-Wagner said.

(Reporting by Francois Murphy; Editing by Susan Thomas)

Source: OANN

Greek PM Tsipras holds his ballot before voting for the European and local elections at a polling station in Athens
Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras holds his ballot before voting for the European and local elections at a polling station in Athens, Greece, May 26, 2019. REUTERS/Costas Baltas

May 26, 2019

ATHENS (Reuters) – Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras said he would call snap elections following the defeat of his Syriza party in European Parliament elections.

Results showed his party trailing by up to nine points behind the opposition New Democracy party. Under normal circumstances, Tsipras’s mandate ends in October.

In a speech Tsipras said he would meet with the Greek President to discuss calling elections immediately after the conclusion of a second round of local Greek elections scheduled for next week.

(Reporting By Michele Kambas)

Source: OANN

Greek PM Tsipras holds his ballot before voting for the European and local elections at a polling station in Athens
Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras holds his ballot before voting for the European and local elections at a polling station in Athens, Greece, May 26, 2019. REUTERS/Costas Baltas

May 26, 2019

ATHENS (Reuters) – Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras said he would call snap elections following the defeat of his Syriza party in European Parliament elections.

Results showed his party trailing by up to nine points behind the opposition New Democracy party. Under normal circumstances, Tsipras’s mandate ends in October.

In a speech Tsipras said he would meet with the Greek President to discuss calling elections immediately after the conclusion of a second round of local Greek elections scheduled for next week.

(Reporting By Michele Kambas)

Source: OANN


Current track

Title

Artist