wealth

David Hookstead | Reporter

Mike Trout is about to be handed the largest contract in the history of sports.

According to ESPN on Tuesday, the Los Angeles Angels are signing him to an extension worth $430 million over 12 years. That puts Bryce Harper’s $330 million deal with the Phillies to shame. According to the same ESPN, it will officially be the largest contract in the history of sports. (RELATED: Bryce Harper Signs With The Phillies)

My friends, below is a live look at Mike Trout’s reaction to getting all this money:

That is so much money. It’s seriously mind-boggling that Trout could become a billionaire off this deal if he’s smart with his money.

Getting over $400 million isn’t generational wealth. It’s the definition of having “f**k-you” money. When you have that kind of paper in the bank, you can do pretty much whatever you want. (RELATED: Philadelphia Phillies Sell $4 Million Worth Of Tickets After Signing Bryce Harper)

As the kids say these days, Trout just got himself paid.

Don’t spend it all in one place, Mike! You never know how all that money might just disappear. In all seriousness, though, how do you even spend that kind of money?

I’m a man of simple tastes, and I’m pretty sure I’d run out of things to buy after two houses and one nice boat. After that, I’m not sure I’d know what to even spend.

However, I’m not in a situation right now to worry about that. The same can’t be said for Trout.

Source: The Daily Caller

U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren speaks about her policy ideas with Anand Giridharadas at the South by Southwest (SXSW) conference and festivals in Austin, Texas
FILE PHOTO: U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren speaks about her policy ideas with Anand Giridharadas at the South by Southwest (SXSW) conference and festivals in Austin, Texas, U.S., March 9, 2019. REUTERS/Sergio Flores

March 19, 2019

By Amanda Becker

CLEVELAND, Miss. (Reuters) – U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren was walking down a street in the town of Cleveland in the rural Mississippi Delta on Monday when she stopped to examine a small home’s sagging roof.

“You can be sure there’s a lot of love in these homes. They just can’t afford (to fix) it,” state Senator Willie Simmons told Warren during the Democratic presidential candidate’s three-day campaign swing through Mississippi, Tennessee and Alabama.

Affordable housing is a chief concern for the senator from Massachusetts, who recently reintroduced a $500 billion housing plan she says will create millions of housing units and reduce rental costs by 10 percent.

But the trip to the deep South, the first extended tour of the region by any of the more than dozen Democrats vying for the party’s 2020 White House nomination, also gave Warren an opportunity to try to set herself apart from the crowded and diverse field.

During meetings with housing advocates in Memphis, Tennessee, and walking tours of small Mississippi towns, Warren, who is white, tested and tailored her central message of combating income inequality to black voters, a critical Democratic voting bloc.

The trip outside the mostly white early voting states of Iowa and New Hampshire that are drawing much of the early 2020 campaign focus signaled that Warren, 69, intends to make a play for support in other states that also could prove important to securing the nomination.

“I’m running to be president of all the people, and it’s important to go around the country and have a chance to talk with people face to face,” Warren told reporters after a town hall that drew about 500 people to a high school in Memphis.

Democrats will have to look beyond the traditional early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina for opportunities to pick up voters next year if an obvious front-runner does not immediately emerge.

Alabama and Tennessee are among the states holding their 2020 nominating primaries on the March 3 “Super Tuesday” following South Carolina’s contest. Mississippi is set to host its primary in mid-March. All three states have sizeable black populations.

Being first to those states will not guarantee votes. But it could win local endorsements and help recruit volunteers for Warren, who lags in national 2020 Democratic presidential opinion polls behind Senators Bernie Sanders and Kamala Harris.

“Warren’s biggest advantage in making this trip is that she will likely have the attention of a critical mass of African-American Democratic primary voters in a cycle where the black vote will drive the nomination process,” said Democratic strategist Joel Payne, who managed African-American advertising for Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign.

‘VISITING HELPS’

Clinton beat Sanders in the 2016 Democratic presidential nominating race in large part because his insurgent campaign failed to gain traction with black voters and flamed out when the contest moved to the South from the early voting states.

In the general election, Clinton’s loss to Republican Donald Trump was partly due to the fact that the black turnout rate declined for the first time in 20 years, according to the nonpartisan Pew Research Center.

African-American turnout in 2016 dropped 7 points from four years earlier, when Barack Obama, the first black U.S. president, was re-elected.

During her trip, Warren touted how her housing plan was aimed at closing the wealth and housing gap between white and black Americans. Her proposal would give first-time homebuyers who live in low-income, formerly segregated areas grants to use for down payments.

It is specifically tailored to benefit black families whose relatives faced discriminatory housing policies in the years leading up to the U.S. civil rights era.

Many residents said they appreciated Warren taking the time to come and focus on their issues. On Tuesday, she planned to tour historic sites in Selma, Alabama, where the 1965 “Bloody Sunday” march marked a turning point in the civil rights movement.

“Visiting helps. It lets the people down here know that somebody in Washington does care about them,” said the Rev. Alice Crenshaw, 75, whose church marked the start of Warren’s walking tour in Cleveland.

The tour of Cleveland on Monday ended at Senator’s Place, the restaurant owned by Simmons, the Mississippi Democratic state senator. Simmons has not endorsed Warren, but like others she spent time with during the campaign swing, he seemed warm to her candidacy.

Sandra Miller-Foster, 68, arrived at Senator’s Place knowing there would be a special visitor but not who. She liked what she heard from Warren.

Asked to assess the Democratic field, which includes two black U.S. senators vying for the nomination, she said policy, not race, would earn her support.

“All people want is a decent job, to own their own home and be able to send their kids to school. We’ve got to know what you’ll do for Mississippi,” Miller-Foster said.

(Reporting by Amanda Becker; Editing by Colleen Jenkins and Peter Cooney)

Source: OANN

The German share price index DAX graph at the stock exchange in Frankfurt
FILE PHOTO: The German share price index DAX graph is pictured at the stock exchange in Frankfurt, Germany, March 1, 2019. REUTERS/Staff

March 19, 2019

By Sruthi Shankar and Agamoni Ghosh

(Reuters) – European shares were on course for a fifth day of gains on Tuesday, with retail and basic resources stocks particularly strong as investors anticipated a more accommodative policy stance from the U.S. Federal Reserve this week.

The benchmark STOXX 600 rose 0.5 percent by 0932 GMT, hitting a five-month peak in what would be its longest winning streak since mid September. Gains were broad-based although Germany’s DAX led the pack with a 0.6 percent rise.

The Fed’s two-day meeting starts on Tuesday, with financial markets expecting the U.S. central bank to reinforce a halt to further rises in interest rates while possibly going further on a plan to cease reductions in its balance sheet.

That would follow moves by the European Central Bank two weeks ago to reloosen policy and pump more money into the financial system, offering hope of a continuation of stock market gains.

“There is a slightly better sentiment about stabilization on the global economy compared to late last year,” said Geoffrey Yu, head of UK investment office at UBS Wealth Management.

“As long as we have this stabilization anchored by clear expectations of a dovish Fed, or at least a non-hawkish Fed, this will be enough to keep things going,” Yu said.

Bank stocks handed back early losses to trade up 0.4 percent, after jumping more than a full percentage point on Monday following confirmation of merger talks between Deutsche Bank and Commerzbank.

Scandal-hit Danske Bank fell more than 5.3 percent in the aftermath of a vote by shareholders against a proposal to break up the bank.

NEW VOTE

News on Brexit also pointed to a delay in efforts by British Prime Minister Theresa May to get her divorce deal through parliament.

The speaker of parliament on Monday ruled May could not put her deal to a new vote unless it was re-submitted in a fundamentally different form. May is due at an EU summit in Brussels on Thursday at which she will ask for a delay to Britain’s planned departure from the bloc on March 29.

London’s FTSE 100, packed with international companies that benefit from a weaker British pound, rose 0.4 percent, boosted by oil majors and miners.

Online supermarket Ocado climbed to a record high after posting strong gains in first-quarter retail sales despite a fire at its flagship distribution center.

Luxury stocks got a lift from positive trade surplus data from Switzerland, with the retail index gaining nearly 1 percent.

Chilean copper miner Antofagasta advanced about 4 percent and was the top gainer on the STOXX 600, as a higher than expected dividend overshadowed a drop in core earnings.

French telecoms operator Iliad dropped more than 2 percent after the company cut its cashflow target for 2020 in France and added it was considering the sale of part of its mobile assets.

(Reporting by Sruthi Shankar and Agamoni Ghosh in Bengaluru; Editing by Catherine Evans and David Holmes)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: The offices of Standard Life Aberdeen in Saint Andrew Square Edinburgh, Scotland
FILE PHOTO: The offices of Standard Life Aberdeen in Saint Andrew Square Edinburgh, Scotland, Britain February 15, 2019.REUTERS/Russell Cheyne/File Photo

March 19, 2019

LONDON (Reuters) – Standard Life Aberdeen said on Tuesday that a tribunal has ruled in its favor regarding a dispute over an investment contract it had with Lloyds Banking Group

The tribunal ruled that the bank was not entitled to give notice to terminate the investment management agreements in respect of around 100 billion pounds ($132.61 billion) in assets managed by Standard Life Aberdeen.

Lloyds had argued that an 11 billion pound merger between fund firms Standard Life and Aberdeen triggered the right to review an agreement struck in 2014 for Aberdeen to manage its pension assets on behalf of its wealth and insurance businesses, because it saw Standard Life as a “material competitor” to both.

Standard Life Aberdeen said it was considering the terms of the decision and appropriate next steps.

(Reporting by Sinead Cruise, editing by Huw Jones)

Source: OANN


ANU scientists have found that Earth is made of the same elements as the Sun but has less of the volatile elements such as hydrogen, helium, oxygen and nitrogen.

Lead author of the study, Dr. Haiyang Wang, said they made the best estimate of the composition of Earth and the Sun with the aim of creating a new tool to measure the elemental composition of other stars and rocky planets that orbit them.

“The composition of a rocky planet is one of the most important missing pieces in our efforts to find out whether a planet is habitable or not,” said Dr. Wang from the ANU Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA).

Other rocky planets in the Universe are de-volatized pieces of their host stars, just like Earth.

The many climate predictions from the left over the decades have proven themselves to be completely false primarily because leftists ignore the impact of the sun on climate. Paul Joseph Watson asks why these scaremongers should continue to be believed.

Co-author and RSAA colleague Associate Professor Charley Lineweaver said every star had some kind of planetary system in orbit around it.

“The majority of stars probably have rocky planets in or near the habitable zone,” he said.

(Photo by NASA)

Co-author Professor Trevor Ireland, from the ANU Research School of Earth Sciences, said the team conducted the study by comparing the composition of Earth rocks with meteorites and the Sun’s outer shell.

“This comparison yields a wealth of information about the way the Earth formed. There is a remarkably linear volatility trend that can be used as a baseline to understand the relationships between meteorite, planet and stellar compositions,” he said.

The research will be published in the journal Icarus.

Alex Jones exposes the massive push around the globe to use corporate media to use the New Zealand shooting to smear patriots.

Source: InfoWars

French President Emmanuel Macron holds a meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris
French President Emmanuel Macron holds a meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France March 18, 2019. Ludovic Marin/Pool via REUTERS

March 18, 2019

By Michel Rose

PARIS (Reuters) – Just when Emmanuel Macron thought he had regained the upper hand over the yellow vest protest movement with his “great debate”, the latest flare-up of violence reminded the French leader that putting his reform agenda back on track won’t be easy.

Town hall meetings across France launched two months ago to defuse the unrest helped Macron reconnect with voters, boosting his popularity and lifting the gloom in the Elysee, even if some participants felt the encounters were a pointless talk shop.

But images of burning banks and ransacked restaurants on the famed Champs-Elysees in Paris this past weekend have put Macron back on the defensive – just as he mulls new policies to appease the “yellow vest” protesters.

“Saturday’s images of the Champs-Elysees threaten the early signs of appeasement that national debate seemed to have created,” Bernard Sananes of polling institute Elabe said.

Organizers of Saturday’s protest called it an “ultimatum”, seeking to intensify pressure on the 41-year-old president as he digests hours of facetime with mayors, high school students, workers and stay-at-home mothers, as well as 1.4 million online contributions.

“His debate may be finished but we are still here on the streets,” 43-year old unemployed Agnes told Reuters TV during the yellow vest march in Paris. “And if he does not satisfy our demands, we will take back the roundabouts, we will go and block everything.”

Whether it was a protesters’ swansong, as his interior minister suggested, or sign of an “endless crisis” as newspaper Le Monde put it in its editorial, Saturday’s destruction pointed to the tense environment in which Macron must make decisions that will shape the rest of his five-year mandate.

Aware of the dangers of high expectations and the limited wiggle room French public finances allow, Macron had visibly instructed his ministers to play down the scope of the announcements he said he would make before mid-April.

“Will we be able to implement all the recommendations and meet all expectations? No, because politics is about making choices,” government spokesman Benjamin Griveaux said.

But Macron’s aides acknowledge he will have to change both his style – critics say he is too controlling while voters have been angered by his perceived loftiness and arrogance – and allow for more participatory democracy.

RISK OF DISAPPOINTMENT

The option of a referendum – which has the advantages of appealing to those nostalgic for Charles de Gaulle’s taste for plebiscites while responding to the yellow vests’ key demand for more people’s votes – remains on the table. But the policy issues that could be put to a plebiscite are yet to be decided.

“The worst thing would be to end up with a great disappointment,” one presidential adviser said. “The president was clear, he does not want the post-debate period to be like the one before the debate.”

Less than three months before European elections that anti-establishment nationalists want to use as a show of force across the continent, a lost referendum could also backfire and offer Macron’s opponents an opportunity to challenge his legitimacy.

The anti-government protests have shown the French crave less inequality, between Paris and the poorest parts of the country as much as between the poor and the rich in general.

That’s why the worst violence since November has targeted the Champs-Elysees boulevard and its boutiques, symbols of an opulent, successful, bourgeois Paris that those who struggle to make ends meet in the provinces resent.

Reducing territorial inequalities and “making work pay” for the poorest was an integral part of Macron’s 2017 manifesto, his aides say, and they are confident households will start to feel the benefits of measures put in place in the last 22 months.

He gave priority early in his presidency to pro-business tax cuts over measures to help low-income workers, and that angered left-leaning voters.

With France having one of the world’s highest tax burdens, financing costly measures to reduce the sense of isolation in small towns and the countryside by adding more hospitals or re-opening closed schools would be difficult, Macron’s aides say.

That means his response is more likely to be a mix of symbolic measures meant to give more say to people and changes to education and training systems.

“We’ve reached the limits of spreading wealth,” one adviser said. “But the potential is huge for tackling the roots of inequalities. So we may have lost sight of some of our goals initially, but we’re firmly back on track now and accelerating.”

(Additional reporting by Marine Pennetier, Elizabeth Pineau and Jean-Baptiste Vey; Editing by Mark Heinrich)

Source: OANN

The outlook for the millennial generation, those who were born in the two decades before the new millennium, are bleak.

Student debt is only one of the burdens. There is also the lack of attractive jobs. Even worse are the inclinations toward socialism that comes attractively packaged as more democracy. Yet there is a solution.

This way out is more capitalism. In as much as free capitalism works as an engine of rising productivity, the living standards can rise. Capitalism creates wealth and promotes prosperity.

Millennials need not worry when their income gives them high purchasing power. Then, even a precarious job situation will provide a good living, quite different from the overall misery that would come with more socialism.

The vision of an anarcho-capitalist order with a highly productive economy and a stateless society stands in stark contrast to the contemporary social-democratic, ‘liberal’ system of governance which marches on to more government spending, more public debt, more regulation, lower productivity, and less purchasing power of the salaries.

The inner workings of the present social-democratic system lead to higher taxes and more contributions. Public debt continues to rise. The endpoint of the existing system of party democracy, social welfare, and state capitalism is not stability, wealth, and liberty but state bankruptcy, misery, and suppression.

The policy agenda of the modern democracy asserts that government could prevent and cure unemployment, economic crises, recessions, depressions, inflation, deflation, and inequality and that the state could provide education, healthcare, and social security for all. The promises of rising incomes and employment dominate the political campaigns. Yet politics has never attained these assertions. In the time to come, these claims will be even less fulfilled.

Socialist policies do not work. They do not work by necessity because they destroy productivity, and productivity is the key to prosperity. The answer to the challenges of the new millennium is not more state interventionism, but to eliminate politics and the state. We must do away with the conventional economic and social policies. Not more welfare state and government intervention are the answer but less state and more free capitalism.

What took place with manufacturing and basic services will encompass sophisticated workplaces. Machines will take over. Job security is a thing of the past. A college degree serves no longer as an insurance policy against unemployment. Yet the new technologies contain the solution of the problems they present. While technological progress destroys occupations, innovations make the economy more productive. Not growth and jobs are the key to the future but higher productivity.

Democratic socialism will not save the millennials, but anarcho-capitalism will.

New tools will make the political apparatus obsolete and allow the privatization of the functions of government, of public administration, and of the judicial system. With the end of party politics and of the monopolistic state dominance, a colossal financial burden will fall from the shoulders of the population.

In a world without a state in the conventional sense, the cost of living would be a fraction of today and obligatory contributions would take only a negligible part of income. Productivity would be so high that the purchasing power of the salaries would do away with the anxieties about job security and of paying the bills.

Without a change to a libertarian order of a stateless society, the road leads to a system where the new technologies may become the deadly instruments of a comprehensive state control in the hands of a totalitarian regime.

In order to avoid a new totalitarianism, the answer is more capitalism and fewer politics. Such a libertarian order would do away with party politics through a system which has the legislative body selected by lottery.

A political system free of party politics together with a market-based monetary order and the private provision of law and of public security would minimize and finally abolish the state as a monopolistic organization of dominance.

An anarcho-capitalist order would open the way for the new technologies to do away with the avalanche of public policies and regulations and thus eliminate the present system, which is so inefficient, corrupt, unjust, and which is in its essence also undemocratic.

Over the past two hundred years, since the Industrial Revolution, technology has transformed human existence more than in all history. In the coming decades, innovations will change the world even more than happened in the past two hundred years.

Free capitalism together with the drastic reduction of the state and the abolishment of politics would do away with the financial burdens that afflict the modern citizen. State intervention in economic life does not lead to prosperity. The path to affluence is the withdrawal of the state and the end of politics.

The new millennium will belong to those societies that discard the administrative state and move towards a form of capitalism that is free of the state and of politics.

Capitalism beyond the state and politics is the future.


Policies pushed by far-leftist Democrats will literally end the national sovereignty of the USA.

Source: InfoWars

Former California GOP Chairman Tom Del Beccaro listed nine ways in which America is moving towards socialism during an appearance on “Fox & Friends” Monday.

Del Beccaro said increased government spending and inflated tax codes are just the beginning and claimed they’ll have a domino effect on the rest of the country.

“We do have massive [spending],” he said. “We are going to spend $7.6 trillion as a society in this upcoming year which is roughly four times what Reagan’s era spent when he said government was the problem.”

“We have massive tax systems,” Del Beccaro continued. “And hallmarks of socialist societies are poor incentives where there is weak economic growth. And that comes from tax systems. Trump did a good job beginning with the business tax code. He’s got to do better with personal so we have better growth.”

He then moved to reduced economic growth through government interference and cited the EU as a prime example.

“[The EU] had zero economic growth over the last 20 years and government is about 60, 70 percent of their economies,” Del Beccaro said. “In the United States we’re about 36 [percent]. With regulations closer to 50. Our growth has slipped from four to two over the last sixty years.”

The popularity of socialism has spread like wild fire especially since the Obama administration.

He also highlighted deficit spending and said it eventually leads to the printing of money, before massive inflation kicks in.

“No government can keep up with the spending, taxes can’t do enough,” he said. “So they start printing money. This is the danger zone when that sort of thing happens. We had it once in the ’70s. Venezuela has it now. They have about a million percent inflation this year. A million.”

Printing money leads to wage and price controls, which could limit commerce and availability, giving rise to underground economies.

“This all comes out of weak economic growth. That’s the key here. If you have zero or less growth, you’re going to have stagnation. And then you start having shortages,” he said.

“In the United States, we had a lot of this during the Carter era. Once the engine got going under Reagan then it changed.”

Del Beccaro said the final two stages of socialism are class warfare and societal discord.

“That all relates to economic growth. If people can get jobs, then they start to worry about what’s on their own plate and advancing,” he said. “But if they can’t get jobs, they look to the others and say well, they’re doing too well. And if you have too much income gap or wealth gap, then it gets played up. That’s where the real danger zone starts.”

(Photo by Andrew Czap, Flickr)

Del Beccaro said America has become more socialist over the last 20 years and accused Democrats of normalizing ideas like the Green New Deal and Medicare for All.

“Spending is so much more. And if they went forward with something like Medicare for All and drove spending above 50 percent, then socialism starts to sound normal and comes into view,” he said. “If we kill off economic growth with AOC’s Green New Deal, then you’re going to have this class warfare. This can be avoided.”

Alex Jones breaks down the latest from New Zealand.

Source: InfoWars

The West Virginia legislature has approved a bill that would take an important first step towards treating gold and silver like money instead of a commodity by repealing sales and use taxes on bullion.

Sen. Craig Blair (R-Martinsburg) sponsored Senate Bill 502 (SB502). The proposed law defines “investment metal bullion” as “elementary precious metal which has been put through a process of smelting or refining, including gold, silver, platinum, and palladium, and which is in such a state or condition that its value depends upon its content and not its form.” It defines investment coins to include numismatic coins or other forms of money and legal tender manufactured of gold, silver, platinum, palladium, or other metal and of the United States or any foreign nation with a fair market value greater than any nominal value of such coins.

The West Virginia Senate passed SB502 by a vote of 33-0. The House concurred by a 90-9 vote. If Gov. Jim Justice signs the bill, it will go into effect July 1.

Enactment of this law would eliminate a barrier to investing in gold and silver and enable West Virginians to better protect themselves from the inflationary practices of the Federal Reserve.

Several other states are considering legislation to repeal taxes on gold and silver, including Arkansas, Tennessee, Oklahoma and Kansas.

Gerald Celente reveals what’s ahead as the Federal Reserve is crashing the debt & real estate bubble it created worldwide.

In Practice

Fundamentally,  gold and silver are money. But most governments treat precious metals as a commodity. They don’t accept it as payment. Worse than that, they tax it. Think about the absurdity of this policy.

Imagine if you asked a grocery clerk to break a $5 bill and he charged you a 35 cent tax. Silly, right? After all, you were only exchanging one form of money for another. But that’s essentially what West Virginia’s sales tax on gold and silver bullion does. By removing the sales tax on the exchange of gold and silver, West Virginia would treat specie as money instead of a commodity. This represents a small step toward reestablishing gold and silver as legal tender and breaking down the Fed’s monopoly on money.

Former Congressman Ron Paul testified during in support of a bill to eliminate capital gains taxes on gold and silver that passed in Arizona in 2017.

“We ought not to tax money – and that’s a good idea. It makes no sense to tax money.”

Paul has been a vocal supporter of this movement. He produced a video urging the Wyoming governor to sign a 2018 bill that repealed all taxes on gold and silver. He noted that things move agonizingly slow in Washington D.C. Passing bills like this at the state level are an important step toward real monetary reform.

“It’s just to me sad that we are so far removed from the Constitution. But a little bit here and a little bit there, there is going to be a revolution in monetary policy.”

Paul emphasized that monetary reform is an important step toward reducing the power of the federal government.

“Believe me, the size and scope and interference of government would change a whole lot if we could rein in the monetary system, rein in the Federal Reserve and rein in this spending.”

Practically speaking, eliminating taxes on the sale of gold and silver would crack open the door for people to begin using specie in regular business transactions. This would mark an important small step toward currency competition. If sound money gains a foothold in the marketplace against Federal Reserve notes, the people will be able to choose the time-tested stability of gold and silver over the central bank’s rapidly-depreciating paper currency.

(Photo by Eric Golub / Flickr)

Background Information

The United States Constitution states in Article I, Section 10, “No State shall…make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts.” States have simply ignored this constitutional provision for years. It’s impossible for a state to return to a constitutional sound money system when it taxes gold and silver as a commodity.

SB502 tales a step toward establishing gold and silver as legal tender in the state and that constitutional requirement, ignored for decades in every state. This sets the stage to undermine the monopoly of the Federal Reserve by introducing competition into the monetary system.

Constitutional tender expert Professor William Greene said when people in multiple states actually start using gold and silver instead of Federal Reserve Notes, it could create a “reverse Gresham’s effect,” drive out bad money, effectively nullify the Federal Reserve, and end the federal government’s monopoly on money.

“Over time, as residents of the state use both Federal Reserve notes and silver and gold coins, the fact that the coins hold their value more than Federal Reserve notes do will lead to a “reverse Gresham’s Law” effect, where good money (gold and silver coins) will drive out bad money (Federal Reserve notes). As this happens, a cascade of events can begin to occur, including the flow of real wealth toward the state’s treasury, an influx of banking business from outside of the state – as people in other states carry out their desire to bank with sound money – and an eventual outcry against the use of Federal Reserve notes for any transactions.”

Once things get to that point, Federal Reserve notes would become largely unwanted and irrelevant for ordinary people. Nullifying the Fed on a state by state level is what will get us there.

Stewart Rhodes joins Matt Bracken & Alex to break down why patriots must be aware of false smears and remember their personal values.

Source: InfoWars

Nick Givas | Media And Politics Reporter

Former California GOP Chairman Tom Del Beccaro listed nine ways in which America is moving towards socialism during an appearance on “Fox & Friends” Monday.

Del Beccaro said increased government spending and inflated tax codes are just the beginning and claimed they’ll have a domino effect on the rest of the country.

“We do have massive [spending],” he said. “We are going to spend $7.6 trillion as a society in this upcoming year which is roughly four times what Reagan’s era spent when he said government was the problem.”

“We have massive tax systems,” Del Beccaro continued. “And hallmarks of socialist societies are poor incentives where there is weak economic growth. And that comes from tax systems. Trump did a good job beginning with the business tax code. He’s got to do better with personal so we have better growth.”

He then moved to reduced economic growth through government interference and cited the EU as a prime example.

“[The EU] had zero economic growth over the last 20 years and government is about 60, 70 percent of their economies,” Del Beccaro said. “In the United States, we’re about 36 [percent]. With regulations closer to 50. Our growth has slipped from four to two over the last sixty years.”

He also highlighted deficit spending and said it eventually leads to the printing of money, before massive inflation kicks in. (RELATED: Venezuelans Who’ve Fled Socialism Shred ‘Hands Off Venezuela’ Protesters)

“No government can keep up with the spending, taxes can’t do enough,” he said. “So they start printing money. This is the danger zone when that sort of thing happens. We had it once in the ’70s. Venezuela has it now. They have about a million percent inflation this year. A million.”

WATCH:

Printing money leads to wage and price controls, which could limit commerce and availability, giving rise to underground economies.

“This all comes out of weak economic growth. That’s the key here. If you have zero or less growth, you’re going to have stagnation. And then you start having shortages,” he said.

“In the United States, we had a lot of this during the Carter era. Once the engine got going under Reagan then it changed.”

Del Beccaro said the final two stages of socialism are class warfare and societal discord.

“That all relates to economic growth. If people can get jobs, then they start to worry about what’s on their own plate and advancing,” he said. “But if they can’t get jobs, they look to the others and say well, they’re doing too well. And if you have too much income gap or wealth gap, then it gets played up. That’s where the real danger zone starts.”

Del Beccaro said America has become more socialist over the last 20 years and accused Democrats of normalizing ideas like the Green New Deal and Medicare for All.

“Spending is so much more. And if they went forward with something like Medicare for All and drove spending above 50 percent, then socialism starts to sound normal and comes into view,” he said. “If we kill off economic growth with AOC’s Green New Deal, then you’re going to have this class warfare. This can be avoided.”

You can Follow Nick on Twitter

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Source: The Daily Caller


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